Milivoje Novaković

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Milivoje Novaković
MilivojeNovakovic.jpg
Personal information
Full name Milivoje Novaković[1]
Date of birth (1979-05-18) 18 May 1979 (age 35)
Place of birth Ljubljana, SFR Yugoslavia
Height 1.92 m (6 ft 4 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Nagoya Grampus
Number 18
Youth career
until 1998 Olimpija
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
until 1999 Olimpija (Reserves)
1999–2000 DSG Klopeinersee 20 (9)
2000–2002 SAK Klagenfurt 16 (7)
2002–2003 ASK Voitsberg 14 (8)
2003–2004 SV Mattersburg 6 (2)
2004–2005 LASK Linz 21 (8)
2005–2006 Litex Lovech 27 (19)
2006–2014 1. FC Köln 166 (74)
2012–2013 Omiya Ardija (loan) 38 (17)
2014 Shimizu S-Pulse 34 (13)
2015– Nagoya Grampus
National team
2006– Slovenia 68 (29)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 5 October 2014.

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 27 March 2015

Milivoje Novaković (born 18 May 1979 in Ljubljana) is a Slovenian footballer who plays for Japanese side Nagoya Grampus and Slovenia national football team.

Club career[edit]

Novaković spent his youth career at Olimpija where he remained until the age of 19, when he was forced to leave and look for the opportunity to play professional football elsewhere as he was written off by the club officials who considered him unpromising and to skinny for a forward.[2][3] He then went to play football for lower tier Austrian clubs where he rose to prominence, eventually signing with professional sides Mattersburg and LASK Linz.[2][3] In 2005 he signed with the Bulgarian top division side Litex Lovech and immediately established himself as one of their top players scoring 16 goals in 24 appearances during the 2005–06 season, earning the title of the league's top goalscorer. During the same season Litex Lovech qualified to the group stage of the 2005–06 UEFA Cup, where Novaković scored two of the clubs's four goals, helping the Bulgarian side in reaching the Round of 32 where they were eliminated by the French side Strasbourg with the score 0–2 on aggregate.

During the summer of 2006 he was linked with several different clubs (e.g. German team 1. FC Köln,[4] Israeli team Beitar Jerusalem FC[5] and Bulgarian champions Levski Sofia[6]) but despite his wish to continue his career in a different club he started, with three goals on three league appearances, the 2006–07 season with Litex Lovech who faced Koper from Slovenia and AC Omonia from Cyprus in the qualifying rounds of the 2006–07 UEFA Cup.[7] However, Novaković's wish to leave the club was granted in late August 2006 when he joined German side Köln for around 1.5 million.[8]

In his first season in Germany Novaković quickly established himself in the first team and eventually finished the season with ten goals in 25 2. Bundesliga appearances, finishing the season second on the club's top scorers list. During his second season with "Die Geißböcke" he scored 20 goals in 33 league appearances and became the top goalscorer of the 2. Bundesliga, helping his side reach the elite Bundesliga. During the 2008–09 season, he was again Köln's top goalscorer with 16 Bundesliga goals to his name. On 12 September 2008, coach Christoph Daum made him captain of the first team squad, however in late November 2009, he lost his captaincy due to a dispute with Köln's new manager Zvonimir Soldo. The 2010–11 season was his best season in the Bundesliga as Köln finished 10th on the league table with Novaković scoring 17 goals, finishing the season on third place in the league's top scorer's list. Novaković was Köln's top scorer in three of the club's four Bundesliga seasons, during his spell at the club, scoring 44 goals in 108 appearances. After finishing the next season on 17th place Köln was relegated and during the summer of 2012 the club officials decided to cut costs of the first team before the start of the season in the second tier.

Novaković was one of the players whose contract expenses were too high and on 1 August 2012, he joined J League side Omiya Ardija, on loan until December 2012. After the end of the loan, Novaković returned to Cologne and stayed fit with an individual training program. On 26 January 2013, the loan was eventually renewed through 31 December 2013. In 2014 Novaković signed a two-year deal with another J League side Shimizu S Pulse.

International career[edit]

He is a striker in the national football team with impressive performances, notably a hat-trick for Slovenia against Trinidad and Tobago. He retired from international football on 13 February 2012, saying he wanted to focus on club football. However, in January 2013 he said that he is ready to play for the national football team once again. On 11 October 2013, he scored a hat-trick against Norway in the 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifications.

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list Slovenia's goal tally first.[9]
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 31 May 2006 Arena Petrol, Celje, Slovenia  Trinidad and Tobago 1–0 3–1 Friendly
2 2–0
3 3–1
4 7 October 2006 Arena Petrol, Celje, Slovenia  Luxembourg 1–0 2–0 UEFA Euro 2008 Qualification
5 8 September 2007 Stade Josy Barthel, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg  Luxembourg 2–0 3–0 UEFA Euro 2008 Qualification
6 6 February 2008 Stadion Športni Park, Nova Gorica, Slovenia  Denmark 1–1 1–2 Friendly
7 10 September 2008 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia  Slovakia 1–0 2–1 2010 FIFA World Cup Qualification
8 2–0
9 11 October 2008 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia  Northern Ireland 1–0 2–0 2010 FIFA World Cup Qualification
10 19 November 2008 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia  Bosnia and Herzegovina 2–4 3–4 Friendly
11 3–4
12 9 September 2009 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia  Poland 2–0 3–0 2010 FIFA World Cup Qualification
13 14 October 2009 Stadio Olimpico, Serravalle, San Marino  San Marino 1–0 3–0 2010 FIFA World Cup Qualification
14 3 March 2010 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia  Qatar 1–0 4–1 Friendly
15 4 June 2010 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia  New Zealand 1–0 3–1 Friendly
16 2–1
17 7 September 2010 Stadion Crvena Zvezda, Belgrade, Serbia  Serbia 1–0 1–1 UEFA Euro 2012 Qualification
18 8 October 2010 Stožice Stadium, Ljubljana, Slovenia  Faroe Islands 4–0 5–1 UEFA Euro 2012 Qualification
19 9 February 2011 Qemal Stafa Stadium, Tirana, Albania  Albania 1–0 2–1 Friendly
20 22 March 2013 Stožice Stadium, Ljubljana, Slovenia  Iceland 1–0 1–2 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualification
21 31 May 2013 Schüco Arena, Bielefeld, Germany  Turkey 1–0 2–0 Friendly
22 10 September 2013 GSP Stadium, Nicosia, Cyprus  Cyprus 1–0 2–0 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualification
23 11 October 2013 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia  Norway 1–0 3–0 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualification
24 2–0
25 3–0
26 9 October 2014 Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia   Switzerland 1–0 1–0 UEFA Euro 2016 Qualification
27 12 October 2014 LFF Stadium, Vilnius, Lithuania  Lithuania 1–0 2–0 UEFA Euro 2016 Qualification
28 2–0
29 27 March 2015 Stožice Stadium, Ljubljana, Slovenia  San Marino 4–0 6–0 UEFA Euro 2016 Qualification

Individual honours[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FIFA World Cup South Africa 2010: List of Players" (PDF). FIFA. 4 June 2010. p. 27. Retrieved 16 April 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Новакович скоро ще е №1 в националния" (in Bulgarian). 7sport.net. 2 June 2006. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Luka Petrič (13 October 2014). "Pri 35 letih v lovu na rekord Zlatka Zahoviča" [At 35 years of age on the hunt for the record of Zlatko Zahovic] (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 13 October 2014. 
  4. ^ "Кьолн иска Миливое Новакович" (in Bulgarian). sport1.bg. 11 July 2006. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  5. ^ "Бейтар Йерусалим иска Новакович" (in Bulgarian). sport1.bg. 4 July 2006. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  6. ^ Katsarov, Rumen (6 June 2006). "Левски хвърли око на Новакович и Желев" (in Bulgarian). standartnews.com. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  7. ^ "?". [dead link]
  8. ^ Popov, Dimitar (30 August 2006). "Новакович подписа с Кьолн за три години" (in Bulgarian). topsport.ibox.bg. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  9. ^ Milivoje Novaković profile at Soccerway

External links[edit]