Millburn, New Jersey

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Millburn, New Jersey
Township
Township of Millburn
South Mountain Reservation in Millburn
South Mountain Reservation in Millburn
Map highlighting Millburn's location within Essex County. Inset: Essex County's location highlighted within the State of New Jersey.
Map highlighting Millburn's location within Essex County. Inset: Essex County's location highlighted within the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Millburn, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Millburn, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°44′30″N 74°19′17″W / 40.741612°N 74.321282°W / 40.741612; -74.321282Coordinates: 40°44′30″N 74°19′17″W / 40.741612°N 74.321282°W / 40.741612; -74.321282[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated March 20, 1857
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Robert J. Tillotson (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Timothy P. Gordon[4]
 • Clerk Christine Gatti[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 9.876 sq mi (25.579 km2)
 • Land 9.322 sq mi (24.145 km2)
 • Water 0.554 sq mi (1.434 km2)  5.61%
Area rank 211th of 566 in state
5th of 22 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 394 ft (120 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 20,149
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 20,213
 • Rank 129th of 566 in state
12th of 22 in county[12]
 • Density 2,161.3/sq mi (834.5/km2)
 • Density rank 280th of 566 in state
16th of 22 in county[12]
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07041 - Millburn[13]
07078 - Short Hills[14][15]
Area code(s) 973[16][17]
FIPS code 3401346380[18][2][19]
GNIS feature ID 0882221[20][2]
Website www.twp.millburn.nj.us

Millburn is a suburban township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 20,149,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 384 (+1.9%) from the 19,765 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,135 (+6.1%) from the 18,630 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Millburn was created as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 20, 1857, from portions of Springfield Township, when Union County was formed.[22]

The township is near South Mountain Reservation, The Mall at Short Hills and the suburban towns of South Orange, Maplewood, Livingston, and Summit. Millburn is also home to the Paper Mill Playhouse, a 70-year-old regional theater.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Millburn as the 53rd best place to live in New Jersey in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[23]

Millburn had the highest annual property tax bills in New Jersey in 2009 at $19,097, compared to the statewide average of $7,300 that year which was the highest in the United States.[24]

Geography[edit]

Millburn is located at 40°44′30″N 74°19′17″W / 40.741612°N 74.321282°W / 40.741612; -74.321282 (40.741612,-74.321282). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 9.876 square miles (25.579 km2), of which, 9.322 square miles (24.145 km2) of it is land and 0.554 square mile (1.434 km2) of it (5.61%) is water.[1][2]

Millburn also includes the hamlet of Short Hills. Millburn comprises the historic Wyoming district, and South Mountain and Millburn Center areas. Short Hills contains the sections of Knollwood, Glenwood, Brookhaven, Country Club, Merrywood, Deerfield-Crossroads, Mountaintop, White Oak Ridge, and Old Short Hills Estates.[25] Situated approximately 15 miles (24 km) from Manhattan, Millburn Township is bordered by the municipalities of Livingston, Florham Park, Chatham Township, Summit, Springfield Township, Union Township, Maplewood and West Orange.

The West Branch of the Rahway River runs through downtown Millburn.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,630
1870 1,675 2.8%
1880 1,743 4.1%
1890 2,437 39.8%
1900 2,837 16.4%
1910 3,720 31.1%
1920 4,633 24.5%
1930 8,602 85.7%
1940 11,652 35.5%
1950 14,560 25.0%
1960 18,799 29.1%
1970 21,089 12.2%
1980 19,543 −7.3%
1990 18,630 −4.7%
2000 19,765 6.1%
2010 20,149 1.9%
Est. 2013 20,213 [11] 0.3%
Population sources: 1860-1920[26]
1860-1870[27] 1870[28] 1880-1890[29]
1890-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32] 2000[33][34] 2010[7][8][9]

Millburn has one of the largest Jewish communities in Essex County, along with neighboring Livingston and South Orange.[35] Philip Roth's popular novel Goodbye, Columbus about a newly affluent Jewish family in the 1950s, was set in the Short Hills section of Millburn, and a key scene takes place at the Millburn High School track.[36]

The township has attracted professionals moving out of Manhattan, thanks to direct train service to Penn Station.[37]

In a report performed by the United Way of Northern New Jersey based on 2012 data, around 11% of Millburn households were classified as "Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed" households (below a threshold of $50,000 for households below 65, below $35,000 for those over 65), struggling with basic necessities, such as housing, childcare, food, health care, and transportation, compared to 38% statewide and 47% in Essex County.[38]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 20,149 people, 6,813 households, and 5,553 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,161.3 per square mile (834.5/km2). There were 7,106 housing units at an average density of 762.2 per square mile (294.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 80.17% (16,154) White, 1.63% (329) Black or African American, 0.03% (6) Native American, 15.66% (3,155) Asian, 0.02% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.51% (103) from other races, and 1.97% (397) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.49% (703) of the population.[7]

There were 6,813 households, of which 48.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.2% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.5% were non-families. 15.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.32.[7]

In the township, 32.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.8 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $165,603 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,937) and the median family income was $194,421 (+/- $14,492). Males had a median income of $136,031 (+/- $14,137) versus $81,152 (+/- $9,621) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $84,663 (+/- $5,971). About 1.3% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[39]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 19,765 people, 7,015 households, and 5,604 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,106.2 people per square mile (813.6/km2). There were 7,158 housing units at an average density of 762.8 per square mile (294.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 88.91% White, 8.40% Asian, 1.10% African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.04% of the population. The most common reported ancestries in 2000 were 13.5% Italian, 12.2% Irish, 11.7% Russian and 11.5% German.[33][34]

There were 7,015 households out of which 44.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.1% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.19.[33][34]

In the township the population was spread out with 30.2% under the age of 18, 3.2% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the township was $130,848, and the median income for a family was $158,888. Males had a median income of $100,000+ versus $51,603 for females. The per capita income for the township was $76,796. About 1.2% of families and 1.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Millburn Avenue in downtown

Since its incorporation as a municipality in 1857, Millburn has operated under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor. A Business Administrator manages the day-to-day functions of the Township.

As of 2014, members of the Township Committee are Mayor Robert J. Tillotson (R term ends December 31, 2014), Deputy Mayor W. Theodore Bourke (R, 2016), Sari Greenberg (R, 2014), Sandra H. Haimoff (R, 2015) and Ian Mount (R, 2016).[3]

Haimoff became Mayor in 2008 following the expiration of former mayor Daniel Baer's term on December 31, 2007.[40] Daniel Baer's service had marked the first time in the history of the town that a Democrat held the title of Mayor.[41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Millburn is located in the 7th Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 27th state legislative district.[8][43][44] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Millburn had been in the 21st state legislative district.[45] Prior to the 2010 Census, Millburn had been split between the 10th Congressional District and the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[45]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[49][50]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 27th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Richard Codey (D, Roseland) and in the General Assembly by Mila Jasey (D, South Orange) and John F. McKeon (D, West Orange).[51][52] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[53] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[54]

Essex County is governed by a directly-elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by the Board of Chosen Freeholders.[55] As of 2014, the County Executive is Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr.[56] The county's Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, four elected on an at-large basis and one from each of five wards, who serve three-year terms of office on a concurrent basis, all of which end December 31, 2014.[55][57][58] Essex County's Freeholders are Freeholder President Blonnie R. Watson (at large; Newark)[59], Freeholder Vice President Patricia Sebold (at large; Livingston)[60], Rufus I. Johnson (at large; Newark)[61], Gerald W. Owens (At large; South Orange, filling the vacant seat after the resignation of Donald Payne, Jr.)[62] Rolando Bobadilla (District 1 - Newark's North and East Wards, parts of Central and West Wards; Newark)[63], D. Bilal Beasley (District 2 - Irvington, Maplewood and Newark's South Ward and parts of West Ward; Irvington)[64], Carol Y. Clark (District 3 - East Orange, Newark's West and Central Wards, Orange and South Orange; East Orange)[65] and Leonard M. Luciano (District 4 - Caldwell, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Fairfield, Livingston, Millburn, North Caldwell, Roseland, Verona, West Caldwell and West Orange; West Caldwell),[66] and Brendan W. Gill (District 5 - Belleville, Bloomfield, Glen Ridge, Montclair and Nutley; Montclair).[67][68][69] Constitutional elected countywide are County Clerk Christopher J. Durkin (West Caldwell, 2015),[70] Sheriff Armando B. Fontoura (2015)[71] and Surrogate Theodore N. Stephens, II (2016).[72][57][73]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 14,099 registered voters in Millburn, of which 4,512 (32.0%) were registered as Democrats, 3,214 (22.8%) were registered as Republicans and 6,361 (45.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.[74]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 58.6% of the vote here (6,097 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 39.8% (4,144 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (72 votes), among the 10,410 ballots cast by the township's 14,034 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.2%.[75] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 55.1% of the vote here (5,682 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 43.9% (4,525 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (83 votes), among the 10,315 ballots cast by the township's 13,548 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.1.[76]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 47.9% of the vote here (3,308 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 44.6% (3,080 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.4% (445 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (27 votes), among the 6,906 ballots cast by the township's 13,913 registered voters, yielding a 49.6% turnout.[77]

Economy[edit]

Dun & Bradstreet has its headquarters in the Short Hills section of Millburn.[78]

Community organizations[edit]

Down the Block, Inc., a 501(c)3 organization, was formed by residents in 2009 to pay bills on behalf of Millburn Township residents in financial distress.[79]

Education[edit]

Glenwood Elementary School
Millburn Free Public Library

The Millburn Township Public Schools serve students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's seven schools had an enrollment of 4,854 students and 371.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.06:1.[80] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[81]) are five elementary schools — Deerfield Elementary School[82] (526 students in grades PreK-5), Glenwood Elementary School[83] (488; K-5), Hartshorn Elementary School[84] (544; K-5), South Mountain Elementary School[85] (330; PreK-5) and Wyoming Elementary School[86] (336; K-5) — Millburn Middle School[87] for sixth through eighth grade (1,151) and Millburn High School[88] for grades 9-12 (1,479).[89][90]

Millburn High School was ranked as Number 148 in Newsweek magazine's listing of "America's Best High Schools" in the August 5, 2005 issue, a ranking based on the number of AP exams taken by the students at the school in the past year divided by the number of graduating seniors.[91] 98.3% of the class of 2010 planned to attend a four-year college or other post-secondary education.[92]

The district's high school was the 5th-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 339 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2014 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", using a new ranking methodology.[93] The school had been ranked 8th in the state of 328 schools in 2012, after being ranked 1st in 2010 out of 322 schools listed.[94] The magazine also ranked Millburn as the top high school in New Jersey in its 2008 rankings.[95]

The influx of younger families into the community has led to significant growth in public school enrollment, with enrollment doubling from 1990 to 2007.[37]

Far Brook School is a private, nonsectarian coeducational day school located in the Short Hills section of Millburn, serving students in nursery through eighth grade, with a total enrollment of 226 students.[96] The Pingry School's Lower School (K-6) campus is located in Short Hills.

St. Rose of Lima Academy is a Catholic school with 260 students in PreK-3 to 8th grade, operating under the auspices of the Archdiocese of Newark,[97] that was established in 1869 and granted academy status in 2008.[98] In September 2013, the St. Rose of Lima Academy was one of 15 schools in New Jersey to be recognized by the United States Department of Education as part of the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program, an award called the "most prestigious honor in the United States' education system" and which Education Secretary Arne Duncan described as honoring schools that "represent examples of educational excellence".[99][100]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 100.77 miles (162.17 km) of roadways, of which 81.45 miles (131.08 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.65 miles (25.19 km) by Essex County and 3.67 miles (5.91 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[101]

A variety of roads serve Millburn. Major county routes include CR 510, CR 527 and CR 577. Route 24 and Route 124 also pass through along the southwestern border with Summit. Interstate 78 passes through the very southern tip of the township in the area of exit 49.

Public transportation[edit]

Millburn Township is served by two New Jersey Transit railroad stations along the Morristown Line, providing service to Newark Broad Street Station, Secaucus Junction and New York Penn Station, as well as to Hoboken Terminal.[102] The Millburn station is located at the intersection of Essex Avenue and Lackawanna Place near the Millburn Free Public Library[103] and the Short Hills station is located near The Crescent Street between Hobart Avenue and Chatham Road.[104] The latter station is also the site of the Millburn-Short Hills Historical Society's museum.[105]

New Jersey Transit operates multiple bus lines along Millburn and Essex Avenues, including the 70 route that stops at the Millburn railroad station on a route between Newark and Livingston.[106]

Sesquicentennial[edit]

In June 2007, Millburn celebrated its 150th birthday in its downtown, in one of the biggest celebrations in Millburn history.[107]

Points of interest[edit]

The Paper Mill Playhouse is one of the oldest regional theaters
Clock tower at the intersection of Main and Essex Streets
Taylor Park

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Millburn include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Committee Members, Township of Millburn. Accessed September 18, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Municipal Staff, Township of Millburn. Accessed September 18, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 95.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Millburn, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Millburn township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 21, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 13. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Millburn township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 21, 2012.
  10. ^ 2010 Census: Essex County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed June 30, 2011.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Millburn, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 21, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Short Hills, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 21, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 24, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Millburn, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 24, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Short Hills, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 24, 2013.
  18. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 24, 2012.
  20. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 129. Accessed March 20, 2012.
  23. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed May 11, 2008.
  24. ^ Heininger, Claire. "N.J. average property taxes grow 3.3 percent to an average of $7,300", The Star-Ledger, February 26, 2010. Accessed June 30, 2011. "New Jersey's highest-in-the-nation residential property taxes continued to climb last year, to an average of $7,281, according to new data released by the state.... The municipality with the highest average bills was Millburn in Essex County, at $19,097."
  25. ^ General Information, Township of Millburn. Accessed March 21, 2012.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 15, 2013.
  27. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 243, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 15, 2013. "Millburn was formed from Springfield March 20th, 1857, and February 25th, 1863, part of it was set off to South Orange Population in 1860, 1,630; and in 1870, 1,675."
  28. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 15, 2013.
  29. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 15, 2013.
  30. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  31. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed March 21, 2012.
  32. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed March 21, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Millburn township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  34. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Millburn township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Forgosh, Linda (2008). "ESSEX COUNTY". Encyclopaedia Judaica. Gale Group. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  36. ^ Capuzzo, Jill P. "Millburn High School Ranks Best in NJ", New Jersey Monthly, August 11, 2008. Accessed June 30, 2011. "Philip Roth put Millburn—or more specifically its upscale neighborhood of Short Hills—on the literary map with his novella Goodbye Columbus, in which a well-to-do Jewish family tries to break into the Waspy, upwardly mobile society there."
  37. ^ a b Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Millburn Township, N.J.; A Town Where Both Halves Live Well", The New York Times, July 16, 2000. Accessed March 21, 2012. "Although Millburn has a large number of doctors, lawyers and other professionals, the mayor said that the majority of newcomers are connected with the financial industries in Manhattan. Among the attractions is NJ Transit's Midtown Direct train service: commuters leaving Millburn end up at Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, avoiding the more laborious route that terminates in Hoboken, where Manhattan-bound riders have to transfer to PATH trains.... As older residents sell their houses in Millburn, public-school enrollment is escalating sharply. It now stands at 3,714, compared with 2,283 in 1990. Dr. James F. Donovan, the superintendent of schools, said that by 2007, enrollment is projected at 4,500."
  38. ^ "ALICE Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed: Study of Financial Hardship", United Way of Northern New Jersey, September 2014. Accessed September 18, 2014. "In total, 1.2 million households in New Jersey – fully 38 percent – struggled to support themselves in 2012."
  39. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Millburn township, Essex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  40. ^ [1], March 26, 2012 Interview with Mayor Sandra Haimoff by Bunn Moxley Homes
  41. ^ Connic, Jennifer. "Baer Reflects on Time on Township Committee", Millburn-ShortHillsPatch, April 14, 2010. Accessed June 30, 2011. "Daniel Baer made history when he became Millburn-Short Hills mayor. He was the first Democratic mayor in the town's history."
  42. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  47. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  49. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  50. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  52. ^ District 27 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  53. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  54. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  55. ^ a b General Information, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014. "The Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, five of whom are elected from districts and four of whom are elected at-large. They are elected for three-year concurrent terms and may be re-elected to successive terms at the annual election in November."
  56. ^ Essex County Executive, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  57. ^ a b Essex County Elected Officials, Essex County Clerk, as of February 2012. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  58. ^ Definition of a Freeholder, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  59. ^ Blonnie R. Watson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  60. ^ Patricia Sebold, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  61. ^ Rufus I. Johnson, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  62. ^ Lee, Eunice. "Labor leader from South Orange tapped as new Essex County freeholder", The Star-Ledger, December 19, 2012. Accessed July 9, 2014. "A longtime labor union leader from South Orange was sworn in this afternoon as the newest Essex County freeholder.Gerald Owens, 74, is a general organizer for the International Longshoremen's Association.... Owens is filling the seat vacated by former at-large freeholder Donald Payne Jr., who stepped down from the post last month after securing the 10th Congressional District seat left open by his late father."
  63. ^ Rolando Bobadilla, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  64. ^ D. Bilal Beasley, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  65. ^ Carol Y. Clark, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
  66. ^ Leonard M. Luciano, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
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  68. ^ The Board of Chosen Freeholders, Essex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2014.
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  108. ^ Arboretum History, Cora Hartshorn Arboretum and Bird Sanctuary. Accessed March 21, 2012. "The Cora Hartshorn Arboretum & Bird Sanctuary was started in 1923 by Cora Hartshorn, daughter of Short Hills founder Stewart Hartshorn, on a 16 acre tract of undeveloped woodland. The “Stone House” section of the building was completed in 1933 using stone and oak from Hartshorn quarries and land. Ms. Hartshorn designed a system of roads and 3 miles of walking paths that were completed in 1938. In 1958, Ms. Hartshorn donated the Arboretum to the township of Short Hills, stipulating that it be maintained as a public park."
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  120. ^ "Adm. Herbert G. Hopwood Dies; Pacific Fleet Commander, '58-60", The New York Times, September 16, 1966. Accessed November 28, 2007. "Adm. Herbert Gladstone Hopwood, who was commander in chief of the United States Pacific Fleet at his retirement from the Navy in 1960, died this morning in St. Barnabas Hospital. He was 67 years old and lived at 68 Tennyson Drive in Short Hills."
  121. ^ Staff. "Danielle Friedman, Elliott Kalan", The New York Times, August 27, 2010. Accessed March 21, 2012. "The bridegroom, also 28, is a writer for “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” on Comedy Central. He has also appeared on the show in roles like Doodle Von Taintstain and Toppington Von Monocle, and as himself. He graduated from New York University. He is a son of Abby Kalan of Millburn, N.J., and Marc Kalan of Maplewood, N.J."
  122. ^ Fretts, Bruce. "Heeeeeere's John C.! Oliver Stone fave John C. McGinley makes a name for himself", Entertainment Weekly, October 15, 2001. Accessed March 15, 2011. "Life hasn't always been so sweet for McGinley. After growing up in Millburn, N.J., he toiled in New York theater, understudying John Turturro for a year and a half in an Off Broadway play called Danny and the Deep Blue Sea."
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  129. ^ Rajtar, Gayle; and Rajtar, Steve. "Annie Russell: Rollins Theater Is Named To Honor The Ethereal Actress Respected For Her Talent And Drive", Winter Park Magazine, February 2011. Accessed March 15, 2011. "It wasn’t long before Russell decided it was time for another break from acting; not just a brief rest, but a true retirement. She was ill with influenza in 1917 and announced her decision to leave the stage and move to a home she already owned in Short Hills, N.J."
  130. ^ D'Onofrio, Laura. "Former resident helps others find love", The Item of Millburn and Short Hills, February 10, 2011. Accessed March 15, 2011. "Patti Stanger moved to Millburn when she was 11 years old and graduated from the high school in 1979. Maybe the name means something to you, or maybe the phrase Millionaire Matchmaker will ring some bells."
  131. ^ Assemblyman Joel M. Weingarten, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 25, 1998. Accessed June 14, 2010.
  132. ^ Staff. "US judge retains tycoon’s case", Taipei Times, August 15, 2009. Accessed March 15, 2011. "Wang Yung-ching died of cardiopulmonary arrest on Oct. 15 at his house in Short Hills, New Jersey, two days after arriving from Taiwan. He traveled to Short Hills 'numerous times on a regular basis every year of the last 20-plus years of his life,' and lived there in the 1980s, the complaint said."
  133. ^ She's got the look, The Observer, July 16, 2006. Accessed May 14, 2008. "She was born Rachel Zoe Rosenzweig in New York and grew up in Short Hills, New Jersey, the daughter of wealthy art collectors."
  134. ^ Capuzzo, Jill L. "From 'Saturday Night Live' to '700 Sundays'", The New York Times, December 12, 2004. Accessed March 15, 2011. "For one thing, it has allowed him to move his family back East, to Short Hills, from Los Angeles, where the Zweibels have been living for the last 15 years."

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