Milroy, Minnesota

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Milroy, Minnesota
City
Cities and townships of Redwood County
Cities and townships of Redwood County
Coordinates: 44°25′5″N 95°33′12″W / 44.41806°N 95.55333°W / 44.41806; -95.55333
Country United States
State Minnesota
County Redwood
Government
 • Type Mayor—Council
 • Mayor Jeff VanDeWiele
Area[1]
 • Total 0.26 sq mi (0.67 km2)
 • Land 0.26 sq mi (0.67 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,109 ft (338 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 252
 • Estimate (2013[3]) 248
 • Density 969.2/sq mi (374.2/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 56263
Area code(s) 507
FIPS code 27-42362[4]
GNIS feature ID 0647895[5]
Website http://milroymn.govoffice2.com/

Milroy is a city in Redwood County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 252 at the 2010 census.[6] It is named after Robert H. Milroy a Union Army general in the American Civil War.[7]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.26 square miles (0.67 km2), all of it land.[1]

Milroy is located along Minnesota Highway 68. It is the most western city of all of Redwood County. It is 13 miles from Marshall, Minnesota and 30 miles from Redwood Falls, Minnesota.

History[edit]

The city of Milroy was platted in 1902 by the Western Town Lot Company, a subsidiary of the Chicago & North Western Railway. The 25 mile long rail line known as the Evan-Marshall Line, which ran from Evan, Minnesota to Marshall, Minnesota. The lots platted were sold April 9, 1902, and many new business began even before houses were built.[8]

The first couple of years were good ones for Milroy. Many business thrived on the railroad, Milroy has had a: newspaper, community bank, hotel, livery yard, creamery and lumber yard. There has been several general stores, cafes, hardware stores, grocery stores and gas stations throughout the years. Milroy was a very heavy grain and livestock shipping station, carrying eight to ten carloads a week. Prior to 1919, there had been daily freight and passenger service. By 1952, the service had been reduced to one freight per day, excluding weekends, and service was later discontinued in 1979 and the tracks were removed.

In the seventies and eighties roads improved, traveling became easier and railroads were not as important as they once were. Adding these factors to the tough competition of big-box stores and decreasing demand and need for small businesses. Many of them, thriving at one time, closed their doors for good or already were closed. Many buildings were subsequently demolished.

The population of Milroy decreased after 1960 to 242 in 1980. This common trend in small towns across America is known as rural flight. The causes of this are primarily due to adaption of industrialized agriculture and urbanization. In 1990 the population increased to 297 (which could be contributed the growth of nearby Marshall, Minnesota and using Milroy as a bedroom community) and now the population is on the decline.

The once bustling and busy streets of Milroy filled with business now remain quiet. All that remains is a few small business, a city park, grain elevator and a elementary school.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 137
1920 177 29.2%
1930 157 −11.3%
1940 261 66.2%
1950 268 2.7%
1960 268 0.0%
1970 247 −7.8%
1980 242 −2.0%
1990 297 22.7%
2000 271 −8.8%
2010 251 −7.4%
Est. 2013 248 −1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census
2013 Estimate

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 252 people, 114 households, and 66 families residing in the city. The population density was 969.2 inhabitants per square mile (374.2/km2). There were 127 housing units at an average density of 488.5 per square mile (188.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.4% White, 1.2% Asian, and 0.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.8% of the population.

There were 114 households of which 24.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.0% were married couples living together, 0.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.1% were non-families. 36.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.92.

The median age in the city was 37 years. 23.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.4% were from 25 to 44; 26.9% were from 45 to 64; and 11.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 51.2% male and 48.8% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 271 people, 119 households, and 76 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,066.0 people per square mile (418.5/km²). There were 132 housing units at an average density of 519.2 per square mile (203.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.42% White, 0.74% Native American, 0.74% Asian, and 1.11% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.85% of the population.

There were 119 households out of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.4% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 33.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.9% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 26.2% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 122.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,625, and the median income for a family was $36,042. Males had a median income of $29,722 versus $18,750 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,866. About 5.2% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under the age of eighteen and none of those sixty five or over.

Noteworthy people[edit]

See also[edit]

Milroy State Bank Building

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-08-01. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 27 April 2011. 
  7. ^ Stennet, William (1908). A History of the Origin of the Place Names Connected with the Chicago & North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railways (2 ed.). University of Michigan. p. 102. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  8. ^ Cooper, H.C. (1916). The History of Redwood County, Minnesota, Volume 1. The University of Wisconsin - Madison. p. 552. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°25′04″N 95°33′12″W / 44.41778°N 95.55333°W / 44.41778; -95.55333