Milton Richman

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Milton Richman (January 29, 1922 – June 9, 1986) was an American sports columnist and sports editor for United Press International who was inducted into the Writer's Wing of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Biography[edit]

During World War II, Richman played in the minor league organization of the St. Louis Browns.[1]

United Press International[edit]

He spent 42 years with United Press International, one of only two jobs he had in his working career. He became a columnist in 1964, and continued to write his sports column after UPI named him as its sports editor from 1972 to 1985.

He was honored by the Press Club of Atlantic City with the National Headliner Award in 1957. He received nominations for the Pulitzer Prize in both 1957 and 1981. Richman was inducted into the Writer's Wing of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1981.[1]

Personal[edit]

Richman died at age 64 on June 9, 1986 of a heart attack. He was survived by his brother, Arthur Richman, who also worked as a sportswriter, and later in the front offices of both the New York Mets and New York Yankees.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Staff. "MILTON RICHMAN", The New York Times, June 10, 1986. Accessed March 26, 2009.