Milwaukee County Zoo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Milwaukee County Zoo
Date opened January 16, 1892
(Washington Park Site)
May 13, 1961
(Current Site)[1]
Location 10001 W. Bluemound Rd.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226
Coordinates 43°1′57.5724″N 88°2′14.64″W / 43.032659000°N 88.0374000°W / 43.032659000; -88.0374000
Land area 200 acres (81 ha)[1]
Number of animals 2,275 (January 2011)[1]
Number of species 330 (January 2011)[1]
Major exhibits Aviary
Apes of Africa/Primates of the World
Aquatic and Reptile Center
Small Mammal Building
Large Mammals
Northwestern Mutual Family Farm
Website www.milwaukeezoo.org

The Milwaukee County Zoo is a zoo in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, operated by the Milwaukee County Parks Commission. The zoo houses 1,800 animals and covers an area of 200 acres (81 ha). It is noted for the second birth of polar bears[2] and siamangs[3] in captivity and for their locally famous gorilla Samson, who lived from 1950 to 1981 and whose bones are now on display at the Milwaukee Public Museum. The zoo is also home to one of the largest group of bonobos in one location outside their native Democratic Republic of the Congo,[4] and has two cheetahs from the National Zoo in Washington, DC.[5]

History[edit]

The Washington Park Zoo[edit]

West Park Zoo opened in 1892, displaying small mammals and birds.[6] The following year, the zoo added two cinnamon bears and created an iron bear den.[7] In 1899, the zoo constructed a $2,137 herbivore building that housed a variety of animals.[8] In 1900, West Park Zoo became Washington Park Zoo and two years later, the zoo was expanded to 23 acres (9.3 ha).[9][10] Even with the Great Depression of the 1930s, the zoo prospered, creating a bear den that resembled bears' natural habitat.[11] In 1931, the zoo's bear collection contained 37 specimens.[12] By 1937, the Washington Park Zoo was beginning to show its age.[13] A reptile exhibit was opened in the main zoo building in 1942.[14] George Speidel, zoo director at this time, began planning a new zoo.[15]

The Milwaukee County Zoo[edit]

Although still located in Washington Park, the zoo changed its name to the Milwaukee County Zoological Gardens in 1953.[16] Fundraising took place in 1956 to offset the estimated cost for building the new zoo of US$12.6 million. The Milwaukee County Zoo opened in 1958 with the primate building, monkey island, feline house, pachyderm mall, and grizzly bear den. The zoo also opened with a 15 in (381 mm) gauge miniature railway, the Zoo Line, which carried visitors around the zoo to view the exhibits and construction.[17] The Zoo Line (now known as the Safari Train) has continued to run, operating with real steam locomotives. In 1959, construction started on the dall sheep mountain and the Alaskan bear exhibit.[18] On May 13, 1961, the Milwaukee County Zoo officially opened to the public.[19] Later additions included the aviary (1962),[20] the Australian building (1963), the original animal hospital (1963),[21] the small mammal building (1965), the aquarium (1968), and the reptile building (1968).[22] In 1965, four Zoomobile tour trains were donated by Allis-Chalmers.[23] This was followed by the children's zoo (1971),[24] and the polar bear underwater viewing exhibit (1986).[25] In 1986, the children's zoo was renamed the Stackner Heritage Farm, and a dairy complex was constructed as part of it, to celebrate Wisconsin as America's Dairyland. The complex included a cow barn, education center, and dairy store.[26] In 1988, the Taylor Family Humboldt Penguin exhibit, the education center, and the Peck Welcome Center opened.[27] In the following years, the renovated sea lion exhibit, featuring underwater viewing, opened,[28] and the aviary was renovated.[29] More recent changes include the addition of the Sterns Family Apes of Africa exhibit (1992),[30] the renovation of the aquarium and reptile building (now known as the Aquatic and Reptile Center),[31] the renovation of the small mammal building (1998), and the addition of the Wong Family Pheasantry (1998).[32] In 2002, Monkey Island was renovated to include a large deck for viewing, and was renamed Macaque Island.[33] 2003 saw a newly remodeled animal health center;[34] 2004, a new education center;[35] and 2005 and 2006, the remodeling of the Heritage Farm, feline building, and giraffe exhibit.[36][37]

Exhibits[edit]

A foraging gorilla in the Sterns Building at the Milwaukee County Zoo.

Taylor Family Humboldt Penguins[edit]

This is an exhibit featuring Humboldt Penguins with underwater viewing.{{[38] }}

Herb and Nada Mahler Family Aviary[edit]

The aviary contains over 60 species[39] in a walk-through building. One section is a cageless room where birds fly free.[citation needed]

Sterns Family Apes of Africa[edit]

This indoor building features bonobos and gorillas.[39] For many years, Samson, the largest gorilla in captivity, was showcased in the Apes of Africa building.[40] The Zoo maintains a bonobo breeding program with one of the largest collections of captive bonobos in the world.[41]

Primates of the World[edit]

Adjacent to Apes of Africa, this exhibit showcases primates from the around the world, including mandrills and orangutans.[39]

Macaque Island[edit]

Macaque Island features Japanese macaques. It was remodeled in 2002 to include a large deck for viewing and an expanded shelter.[33]

Otto Borchert Family Special Exhibits Gallery[edit]

This building is dedicated to special or traveling exhibits.[citation needed]

Aquatic and Reptile Center[edit]

This building holds invertebrates, fish, reptiles, and amphibians.[39]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Milwaukee County Zoo-About Us". Milwaukeezoo.org. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  2. ^ "International Polar Bear Husbandry Conference Proceedings". Archived from the original on June 21, 2006. Retrieved 2007-08-15. 
  3. ^ "The New Milwaukee County Zoo ~ 1961–1984 – 1962". Archived from the original on January 12, 2010. Retrieved 2007-08-15. 
  4. ^ "Animal Division: Individual Conservation and Research Projects – Bonobos". Archived from the original on July 3, 2008. Retrieved 2007-08-15. 
  5. ^ "Meet the Zoo's Cheetahs". Archived from the original on July 16, 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-15. 
  6. ^ "Building the Washington Park Zoo ~ 1892–1927 – 1892". Archived from the original on January 12, 2010. Retrieved 2011-11-27. 
  7. ^ "1893". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  8. ^ "1899". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  9. ^ "1900". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2012. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  10. ^ "1902". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  11. ^ "1930". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  12. ^ "1931". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  13. ^ "1937". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  14. ^ "1942". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  15. ^ "1947". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  16. ^ "1953". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  17. ^ "1958". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  18. ^ "1959". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 13, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  19. ^ "1961". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 25, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  20. ^ "1962". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 12, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  21. ^ "1963". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  22. ^ "1968". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  23. ^ "1965". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  24. ^ "1971". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 15, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  25. ^ "1986". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  26. ^ "1987". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  27. ^ "1988". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  28. ^ "1990". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 13, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  29. ^ "1991". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  30. ^ "1992". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  31. ^ "1995". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 15, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  32. ^ "1998". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  33. ^ a b "2002". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  34. ^ "2003". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 13, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  35. ^ "2004". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 15, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  36. ^ "2005". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on June 11, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  37. ^ "2006". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on January 16, 2010. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  38. ^ "Meet the Animals". Milwaukee County Zoo. Retrieved 11 March 2014. 
  39. ^ a b c d "Listings of Animals". Milwaukeezoo.org. Archived from the original on 2010-10-26. Retrieved 2011-12-17. 
  40. ^ "Memories of Samson the Gorilla". Zoological Society of Milwaukee. Archived from the original on 2011-07-04. Retrieved 2012-02-29. 
  41. ^ "Milwaukeezoo.org". Archived from the original on 2010-10-28. Retrieved 2012-02-29. 

External links[edit]