Mini-MAX

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Mini-MAX
TEAM 1100R Mini-Max.jpeg
1100R Mini-MAX
Role Kit aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Team Mini-Max
Designer Wayne Ison
First flight 1984
Introduction 1984
Status Kits In production
Number built More than 1802
Variants JDT Hi-MAX
TEAM 1600R Sport
TEAM 1600R Sport
TEAM 1300Z Z-MAX

The Team Mini-MAX is a large family of single-seat, mid-wing, strut-braced, single engine aircraft, available in kit form for amateur construction. The first Mini-MAX had its first flight in 1984. Its name indicates its original design goals: a minimum-cost aircraft that requires a minimum of building space, time and skill, but which provides a maximum of enjoyment and performance.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

The Mini-MAX family was originally produced by TEAM Incorporated of Bradyville, Tennessee. After that company was bankrupted by a lawsuit, production passed to Ison Aircraft also of Bradyville, Tennessee and next to JDT Mini-MAX of Nappanee, Indiana. The company was renamed Team Mini-Max LLC in 2012, with production in Niles, Michigan.[1][2][3][4][5][6][8]

Development[edit]

The Mini-MAX models are all predominantly constructed from wood truss with plywood gussets and covered with doped aircraft fabric. The construction time to complete a Mini-MAX varies depending on the model chosen. Many models feature open cockpits equipped with windshields. All versions feature a short-span wing of only 25 ft (7.6 m), except the V-MAX and 1600R EROS, which have a 26.5 ft (8.1 m) wingspan. The wing and horizontal stabilizer are both strut-braced: the wing is braced to the landing gear and the tail is braced from the horizontal tail surface to the fin. All models have conventional landing gear, with wheel pants as an option. Since the wing is braced to the mainwheels and the mainwheels are connected by a rigid axle, the pneumatic tires provide the only suspension.[5][6]

The aircraft was originally intended to meet the requirements of the US FAR 103 Ultralight Vehicles category, including that category's maximum 254 lb (115 kg) empty weight. The original ultralight models of the Mini-MAX were equipped with the 28 hp (21 kW) Rotax 277 engine to achieve acceptable empty weights. Today the 1030F MAX 103 and 1100F Mini-MAX achieve an acceptable FAR 103 empty weight if they are equipped with the 28 hp (21 kW) Hirth F-33 powerplant. Other models use heavier engines which place them in the US Experimental - Amateur-built category.[5][9][10]

The Mini-MAX was also developed into a high winged version, called the Hi-MAX. The two designs share much in the way of parts and design concept commonality.[11]

Variants[edit]

1030F MAX-103
Single seat, open cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 28 hp (21 kW) Hirth F-33 engine. Still in production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 300-350 hours.[9]
1030R MAX-103
Single seat, open cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 28 hp (21 kW) Rotax 277. First flight 1993, out of production, replaced by the 1030F. Manufacturer claimed construction time 350 hours. 250 completed and flown by 2011.[1][2][3][4][5][7]
1100F Mini-MAX
Single seat, open cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 28 hp (21 kW) Hirth F-33 engine. Still in production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 250-300 hours.[10]
1100R Mini-MAX
Single seat, open cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447 engine. First flight 1984, still in production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 250-300 hours. 600 completed and flown by 2011.[1][2][3][4][7][12]
1200Z Z-MAX
Single seat, open cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 45 hp (34 kW) Zenoah G-50 engine. First flight 1991, out of production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 350 hours. 124 completed and flown by 2001. As this is a US aircraft the name is pronounced "Zee-Max".[1][3][4]
1300Z Z-MAX
Single seat, enclosed cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 45 hp (34 kW) Zenoah G-50 engine. First flight 1990, out of production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 400 hours. 231 completed and flown by 2001. As this is a US aircraft the name is pronounced "Zee-Max".[1][3][4]
1500R Sport
Single seat, open cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447 engine. First flight 1987, still in production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 300-350 hours. 200 completed and flown by 2011.[1][2][3][4][7][13]
1550V V-MAX
Single seat, open cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 50 hp (37 kW) Volkswagen air-cooled engine and 26.5 ft (8.1 m) wingspan. First flight 1993, still in production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 325-400 hours. 250 completed and flown by 2011.[1][2][3][4][7][14]
1600R Sport
Single seat, enclosed cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447. First flight 1989, still in production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 325-400 hours. 315 completed and flown by 2011.[1][2][3][4][7][15]
1650R EROS
Single seat, enclosed cockpit, mid-wing aircraft with the 50 hp (37 kW) Rotax 503 and 26.5 ft (8.1 m) wingspan. Still in production. Manufacturer claimed construction time 325-400 hours. 300 completed and flown by 2011.[1][2][3][4][7][16]

Specifications (1650R EROS)[edit]

Data from Aerocrafter, Kitplanes & JDT website[1][2][3][4][16]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Length: 16 ft 0 in (4.88 m)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
  • Height: 5 ft 0 in (1.52 m)
  • Wing area: 118 sq ft (11.0 m2)
  • Empty weight: 400 lb (181 kg)
  • Gross weight: 700 lb (318 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 10 US gallons (38 litres)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rotax 503 twin cylinder, two-stroke aircraft engine, 50 hp (37 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 80 mph (129 km/h; 70 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 75 mph (65 kn; 121 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 36 mph (31 kn; 58 km/h)
  • Never exceed speed: 110 mph (96 kn; 177 km/h)
  • Range: 144 mi; 232 km (125 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 12,000 ft (3,658 m)
  • G limits: +4.0/-2.0
  • Rate of climb: 1,200 ft/min (6.1 m/s)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Purdy, Don: AeroCrafter - Homebuilt Aircraft Sourcebook, page 268-271. BAI Communications. ISBN 0-9636409-4-1
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Downey, Julia: 2008 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 24, Number 12, December 2007, page 57-58. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Downey, Julia: 2002 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 18, Number 12, December 2001, pages 46-47. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Kitplanes Staff: 1999 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 15, Number 12, December 1998, page 70-71. Primedia Publications. IPM 0462012
  5. ^ a b c d e Cliche, Andre: Ultralight Aircraft Shopper's Guide 8th Edition, page B-40 Cybair Limited Publishing, 2001. ISBN 0-9680628-1-4
  6. ^ a b c JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "The JDT Mini-MAX Line". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Vandermeullen, Richard: 2011 Kit Aircraft Buyer's Guide, Kitplanes, Volume 28, Number 12, December 2011, page 57. Belvoir Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  8. ^ Team Mini-Max (2012). "About Team Mini-Max". Retrieved 21 November 2012. 
  9. ^ a b JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "1030F "MAX 103"". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  10. ^ a b JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "1100F "Ultralight Mini-MAX"". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  11. ^ JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "The JDT Hi-MAX Line". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  12. ^ JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "The Original "Mini-MAX" 1100R". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  13. ^ JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "1500R "Sport"". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  14. ^ JDT Mini-MAX (2004). ""V-MAX" 1550V". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  15. ^ JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "1600R "Sport"". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  16. ^ a b JDT Mini-MAX (2004). "1650R "EROS"". Retrieved 2009-10-19. 

External links[edit]