Mini-Tuesday

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Seven states held caucuses or primary elections on Mini-Tuesday in 2004. Blue denotes Democratic-only contests (4) and Purple represents states holding elections for both parties (3).

Mini-Tuesday was the name given to the February 3, 2004 U.S. presidential primary where several states, which to that point had participated in "Super Tuesday," cast their votes for the Presidential nominees of the 2004 Presidential election.[1][2] Mini-Tuesday was also called Super Tuesday I (with the March Super Tuesday called Super Tuesday II, in reference to their respective chronological order).[1] With the large number of states moving their election dates up to Mini-Tuesday for the 2008 election cycle, pundits have largely shied away from using the term again, instead choosing to reappropriate the term "Super Tuesday" to better represent the primaries held on that approximate date.[citation needed] The date is also known as "Super Duper Tuesday," "Giga Tuesday," and "Tsunami Tuesday," among others, with the term "Mini Tuesday" falling to apparent disuse for the time being.[3]

In 2004, U.S. presidential primary elections occurred in Missouri, South Carolina, Arizona, Oklahoma and Delaware. Presidential caucuses were held in New Mexico and North Dakota. The Republican primaries and caucuses were virtually uncontested as incumbent President George W. Bush faced no substantial opposition. The Democratic primaries and caucuses were contested between retired General Wesley Clark of Arkansas, former Governor Howard Dean of Vermont, Senator John Edwards of North Carolina, Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts, Congressman Dennis Kucinich of Ohio, Senator Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, and the Reverend Al Sharpton of New York.[2]

2004 Results[edit]

Missouri[edit]

Kerry handily won the biggest prize of the day by securing 51% of the vote in Missouri. Edwards placed second with 25%. All other candidates were in the single digits.

Democratic Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
John Kerry 211,737 50.6% 48
John Edwards 103,188 24.7% 26
Howard Dean 36,305 8.7% 0
Wesley Clark 18,328 4.4% 0
Joseph Lieberman 14,726 3.5% 0
Al Sharpton 14,312 3.4% 0
Richard Gephardt 8,306 2.0% 0
Dennis Kucinich 4,876 1.2% 0
Uncommitted 4,316 1.0% 0

Republican Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage
George W. Bush 117,007 95.1%
Bill Wyatt 1,268 1.0%
Blake Ashby 981 0.8%
Uncommitted 3,830 3.4%

Libertarian Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage
Gary Nolan 874 45.2%
Ruben Perez 164 8.5%
Jeffrey Diket 152 7.9%
Uncommitted 744 38.5%

Source: Missouri Department of State

South Carolina[edit]

In a major victory, Edwards took his birth state of South Carolina, garnering 45% of the vote to Kerry's 30%.

Democratic Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
John Edwards 126,320 45.0% 28
John Kerry 84,872 30.2% 17
Al Sharpton 26,946 9.6% 0
Wesley Clark 20,189 7.2% 0
Howard Dean 13,055 4.7% 0
Joseph Lieberman 6,853 2.4% 0
Dennis Kucinich 1,246 0.4% 0
Richard Gephardt 604 0.2% 0
Carol Moseley Braun 569 0.2% 0

Republican Results:

On January 19, 2003, the Republican National Convention announced that the South Carolina Republican Party had passed a resolution granting George W. Bush South Carolina's 46 delegates.

Source: The Green Papers

Arizona[edit]

Kerry made a strong showing in Arizona by winning the support of 43% of voters. Clark placed second with 27%. Arizona was the only state primary in which Dean acquired any delegates. His 14% share of the vote netted him just one delegate.

Democratic Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
John Kerry 101,809 42.5% 30
Wesley Clark 63,256 26.7% 22
Howard Dean 33,555 13.9% 3
John Edwards 16,596 6.9% 0
Joseph Lieberman 15,906 6.7% 0
Dennis Kucinich 3,896 1.6% 0
Al Sharpton 1,177 0.5% 0
Richard Gephardt 755 0.3% 0
Carol Moseley Braun 325 0.1% 0
Lyndon LaRouche 295 0.1% 0
Dianne Barker 257 0.1% 0
Bill Wyatt 233 0.1% 0

Republican Results:

On March 12, 2003 - A state Senate committee in Arizona backed a Republican measure to save $3 million by forgoing that state's primary. District and county conventions will be held in April.

Sources: Arizona Department of State, The Green Papers

Oklahoma[edit]

Oklahoma was the most hotly contested state of Mini-Tuesday 2004. Clark needed it to stay in the race, while Edwards wanted it so that he could walk away with two victories. In the end, both candidates got 30% of the vote, with Clark slightly ahead of Edwards. Kerry also placed strongly with 27%.

Democratic Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
Wesley Clark 90,453 29.93% 15
John Edwards 89,234 29.53% 13
John Kerry 81,015 26.81% 12
Joseph Lieberman 19,678 6.51% 0
Howard Dean 12,728 4.21% 0
Al Sharpton 3,939 1.30% 0
Dennis Kucinich 2,544 0.84% 0
Richard Gephardt 1,890 0.64% 0
Lyndon LaRouche 688 0.23% 0

Republican Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage
George W. Bush 59,562 89.99%
Bill Wyatt 6,622 10.01%

Source: Oklahoma Department of State

Delaware[edit]

Lieberman took second place in Delaware with 11% of the vote. However, as this was insufficient to gain him any delegates, he dropped out of the race after a bad showing in the other primaries. Kerry carried the state with 50% of the vote and all thirteen delegates.

Democratic Results:

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
John Kerry 16,787 50.4% 14
Joseph Lieberman 3,706 11.1% 0
John Edwards 3,674 11.0% 0
Howard Dean 3,462 10.4% 0
Wesley Clark 3,165 9.5% 0
Al Sharpton 1,888 5.7% 1
Dennis Kucinich 344 1.0% 0
Richard Gephardt 187 0.6% 0
Lyndon LaRouche 78 0.2% 0

Republican Results:

Regional meetings in April will choose delegates for a State Convention in mid-May.

Source: The Green Papers

Caucuses[edit]

In both New Mexico and North Dakota, Kerry placed first by a wide margin and Clark came in second to score a small number of delegates. Additionally, Dean achieved moderate success in New Mexico by netting 18% of the vote and three delegates.

Democratic Results:

New Mexico

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
John Kerry 43,553 42.6% 14
Wesley Clark 20,883 20.4% 8
Howard Dean 16,747 16.4% 4
John Edwards 11,440 11.2% 0
Dennis Kucinich 5,638 5.5% 0
Joseph Lieberman 2,578 2.5% 0
Richard Gephardt 653 0.6% 0
Uncommitted 479 0.5% 10
write-in /others 176 0.2% 0
Fern Penna 84 0.1% 0

North Dakota

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates
John Kerry 5,366 50.8% 9
Wesley Clark 2,502 23.7% 5
Howard Dean 1,231 11.7% 4
John Edwards 1,025 9.7% 0
Dennis Kucinich 308 2.9% 0
Joseph Lieberman 98 0.9% 0
Al Sharpton 28 0.3% 0
Uncommitted - - 7

Republican Results:

George W. Bush won all 26 of North Dakota's Delegates to the Republican National Convention in the Republican Presidential Preference Caucus.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Q&A: US primary elections". BBC News. 2008-01-10. Retrieved 2008-01-12. In 2004, Super Tuesday split in two. There was a Mini-Tuesday (or Super Tuesday I) on 3 February, followed by a Super Tuesday II on 2 March. 
  2. ^ a b Corn, David (2004-02-04). "Mini-Tuesday: Ten Talking Points". The Nation. Retrieved 2008-01-12. 
  3. ^ Schneider, Bill (2007-02-07). "It could all be over after 'Super Duper Tuesday'". CNN. Retrieved 2007-06-03.