Miniature (The Twilight Zone)

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"Miniature"
The Twilight Zone episode
Episode no. Season 4
Episode 110
Directed by Walter Grauman
Written by Charles Beaumont
Featured music Fred Steiner
Production code 4862
Original air date February 21, 1963
Guest actors

Robert Duvall: Charley Parkes
Pert Kelton: Mrs. Parkes
Barbara Barrie: Myra
William Windom: Dr. Wallman
John McLiam: Guard
Barney Phillips: Diemel
Claire Griswold: The Doll (Alice)
Lennie Weinrib: Buddy

Episode chronology
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"Printer's Devil"
List of Twilight Zone episodes

"Miniature" is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

Plot[edit]

Charley Parkes thinks he sees a figure in a museum dollhouse that comes alive. Charley returns to the museum numerous times and gazes into the dollhouse. He keeps coming back and sees the doll in the house become animated (portrayed by a human actress).

Charley falls in love with the figure, a woman who is in an abusive relationship with a male figure in the dollhouse. There is also a female housekeeper in the dollhouse. Charley is committed to a psychiatric hospital because of his belief that the figures in the dollhouse are alive. He eventually is "rehabilitated", after some resistance, by pretending to be disabused of the delusion, and is returned to the care of his mother.

On the evening of his return home, his mother, sister, brother-in-law and a friend of his sister (who's interested in dating him) plan to celebrate his release with him, but discover that he has escaped from the house. They contact the psychiatrist who treated Charley in the hospital and surmise that he has returned to the museum and the dollhouse.

The family members, psychiatrist and museum guards search the museum but find nothing. Except for one guard, who glances into the dollhouse and sees Charley, now a miniature figure, finally together with his love in the dollhouse, sharing a stereoscope. Smiling, the guard decides to never reveal what he's witnessed.

Re-airing[edit]

Because of a lawsuit, this episode was not included in the syndication package for The Twilight Zone. It was finally re-aired in 1984 as part of The Twilight Zone Silver Anniversary Special. For this showing, the dollhouse scenes were colorized in an early public demonstration of the process.[1] .[2][3][4]

Critical Reception[edit]

This episode's reputation derives primarily from Robert Duvall's performance. It has been described as an "absolute tour-de-force" (IMDb.com); "a tour-de-force of underplaying" (Amazon.com); and "great acting" (TV.com). See the External Links below.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holden, Stephen (October 19, 1984). "Silver Anniversary for 'The Twilight Zone'". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on January 1, 2013. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  2. ^ DeVoe, Bill. (2008). Trivia from The Twilight Zone. Albany, GA: Bear Manor Media. ISBN 978-1-59393-136-0
  3. ^ Grams, Martin. (2008). The Twilight Zone: Unlocking the Door to a Television Classic. Churchville, MD: OTR Publishing. ISBN 978-0-9703310-9-0
  4. ^ Zicree, Marc Scott: The Twilight Zone Companion. Sillman-James Press, 1982 (second edition). ISBN 1-879505-09-6
  5. ^ *DeVoe, Bill. (2008). Trivia from The Twilight Zone. Albany, GA: Bear Manor Media. ISBN 978-1-59393-136-0

External links[edit]