Miniature Dachshund

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Miniature (or Zwergteckel) dachshunds have a typical weight of 8 to 11 lb, the smaller the dog the better.[1] They also are normally a height of 5 to 7 in.[2] They are nicknamed "wiener dogs", "hot dogs" or "sausage dogs".

Miniature Dachshund

History[edit]

The Dachshund breed was not found until at least the 16th century in Germany. The name dachshund comes from the German words dachs (badger) and hund (dog). Before the 1900s smaller Dachshunds were used to for going underground to catch very small animals. Some of these Dachshunds were at first just runts of their litters, but later others were created intentionally by crossing Dachshunds with Toy Terriers and Pinschers. Most of the Miniature Dachshunds produced this way did not have the characteristics of the dachshund breed. This continued until about 1910 when stricter criteria was given to reproduce the breed. Now each type of coat has a different breed to cross with to get the best results: wire-haired cross with Miniature Schnauzer, long-haired with Papillon and lastly, smooth-haired cross with Miniature Pinschers.[3]

Appearance and Characteristics[edit]

Miniature Dachshunds come in all three coats: Smooth, long-haired, and wire-haired. They also come in many colors including red, tan, yellow, chocolate, black, grey, or a combination of these colors.[4]

Low to ground, long in body and short of leg, with robust muscular development; Where the muscles contract the skin of the Miniature Dachshund is elastic and pliable without excessive wrinkling. Appearing neither crippled, awkward, nor cramped in his capacity for movement, the Miniature Dachshund is well-balanced with bold and confident head carriage and intelligent, alert facial expression. The Miniature Dachshund was developed to hunt small game above and below ground. His keen nose gives him an advantage over most other breeds for trailing.[5][6]

Temperament[edit]

Bred to hunt, they are by nature high-spirited and independent. They have a keen intelligence and ability to think on their own. All varieties have their own brand of charm since they have slightly differing ancestry that helped in the development of the coats. They are great for families that have older children; they need patience and maturity to be handled well. They are also, devoted to their family, they will voice loudly when strangers are near, yet generally accept that same stranger after an introductory period.[7][8][9]

Health and Care[edit]

Miniature Dachshunds can live comfortably in both rural and urban areas. They are very active, and thus need frequent walks. They also need weekly brushing, especially those with long and wire haired coats. Miniature Dachshunds usually live about 12 to 14 years. A disease that is very common in the Miniature Dachshund is Intervertebral Disc Disease which is often caused by obesity.[10] This disease usually occurs in Miniature Dachshunds between 3 and 6 years of age. Complications that may occur are loss of the ability to walk and to move limbs and the loss of control of the urinary bladder.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Miniature Dachshund Club. (2007, June 6). NMDC standard of the dachshund. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://www.dachsund-nmdc.org
  2. ^ Rheingold, T. (2004). Miniature Dachshund dogs [Fact sheet]. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://www.dogster.com
  3. ^ Discovery. (2012). Dachshund (Miniature) guide. Retrieved December 7, 2012, from Animal Planet website: http://animal.discovery.com/breed-selector/ dog-breeds/hound/dachshund-miniature.html
  4. ^ Rheingold, T. (2004). Miniature Dachshund dogs [Fact sheet]. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://www.dogster.com
  5. ^ National Miniature Dachshund Club. (2007, June 6). NMDC standard of the dachshund. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://www.dachsund-nmdc.org
  6. ^ American Kennel Club. (2012). Get to know the Dachshund. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from American Kennel Club website: http://www.akc.org/breeds/ dachshund/index.cfm
  7. ^ National Miniature Dachshund Club. (2007, June 6). NMDC standard of the dachshund. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://www.dachsund-nmdc.org
  8. ^ Rheingold, T. (2004). Miniature Dachshund dogs [Fact sheet]. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from http://www.dogster.com
  9. ^ American Kennel Club. (2012). Get to know the Dachshund. Retrieved December 10, 2012, from American Kennel Club website: http://www.akc.org/breeds/ dachshund/index.cfm
  10. ^ Discovery. (2012). Dachshund (Miniature) guide. Retrieved December 7, 2012, from Animal Planet website: http://animal.discovery.com/breed-selector/ dog-breeds/hound/dachshund-miniature.html