Ministry for Culture and Heritage

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Manatū Taonga
MCH-logo.png
Agency overview
Formed 1999
Preceding Agency Ministry of Cultural Affairs
Jurisdiction New Zealand
Headquarters Level 4, ASB House,
101-103 The Terrace,
Wellington
WELLINGTON 6145
Annual budget Total budgets for 2014/15[1]
Vote Arts, Culture and Heritage
$281,848,000
Vote Sport and Recreation
$84,194,000
Minister responsible Hon Maggie Barry
- Minister for Arts, Culture
and Heritage
Agency executive Lewis Holden
- Chief Executive
Website mch.govt.nz

The Ministry for Culture and Heritage (MCH) (Māori: Manatū Taonga) is the public service department of New Zealand charged with advising the government on policies and issues involving the arts, culture, heritage, sport and recreation, and broadcasting sectors, and participating in functions that advance or promote those sectors.

History[edit]

The Ministry was formed on 1 September 1999 and took over the functions of the former Ministry of Cultural Affairs. The first minister was the then-Prime Minister Helen Clark, who held the position until the end of her Government in 2008.

Under the John Key Government, two officeholders have served as ministers. Between November 2008 and October 2014, Christopher Finlayson, and now the current minister, Maggie Barry.[2]

Functions[edit]

Unlike some other government bodies the Ministry does not have a single piece of legislation which covers its operation: its role is spread across dozens of current acts and regulations.[3] These include:

Ministers[edit]

The Ministry serves 3 portfolios and 4 ministers.[21]

Officeholder Portfolio(s) Other responsibility(ies)
Hon Maggie Barry Lead Minister (Ministry for Culture and Heritage)
- Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage
Hon Dr Jonathan Coleman - Minister for Sport and Recreation
Hon Amy Adams - Minister of Broadcasting
Hon Murray McCully - Associate Minister for Sport and Recreation

New Zealand History Online[edit]

The ministry's History Group produces New Zealand History Online (NZHistory).[22]

David Green, a historian working for the ministry, discovered that significantly more New Zealand personnel were engaged in the Gallipoli Campaign than had been recorded in Fred Waite's official history, The New Zealanders at Gallipoli. Waite's number of some 8,500 men was corrected to approximately 13,000 in September 2013.[23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Total Appropriations for Each Vote". Treasury.govt.nz. Retrieved 23 October 2014. 
  2. ^ "Ministerial List for Announcement" (PDF). Beehive.govt.nz. October 2014. Retrieved 23 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "Search – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  4. ^ "Canterbury Earthquake (Historic Places Act) Order 2011 (SR 2011/231) – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  5. ^ "Television New Zealand (Separation of Transmission Business) Order 2003 (SR 2003/323) (as at 21 November 2003) – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  6. ^ "Historic Places Trust Elections Regulations 1993 (SR 1993/302) (as at 31 January 2007) – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  7. ^ "Broadcasting Act 1989 No 25 (as at 01 July 2011), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  8. ^ "Television New Zealand Act 2003 No 1 (as at 23 July 2011), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  9. ^ "Protected Objects Act 1975 No 41 (as at 01 April 2011), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  10. ^ "Historic Places Act 1993 No 38 (as at 01 April 2011), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  11. ^ "National War Memorial Act 1992 No 20 (as at 01 October 2000), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  12. ^ "Radio New Zealand Act 1995 No 52 (as at 25 January 2005), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  13. ^ "Anzac Day Act 1966 No 44 (as at 01 April 2004), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  14. ^ a b "New Zealand Film Commission Act 1978 No 61 (as at 25 January 2005), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  15. ^ "Flags, Emblems, and Names Protection Act 1981 No 47 (as at 07 July 2010), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  16. ^ "Archives, Culture, and Heritage Reform Act 2000 No 32 (as at 01 November 2006), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  17. ^ "Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Act 1992 No 19 (as at 25 January 2005), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  18. ^ "Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa Act 1994 No 19 (as at 01 January 2009), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  19. ^ "Port Nicholson Block (Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika) Claims Settlement Act 2009 No 26, Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  20. ^ "Ngaa Rauru Kiitahi Claims Settlement Act 2005 No 84 (as at 23 May 2008), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011. Retrieved 30 October 2011. 
  21. ^ "Ministerial List for Announcement" (PDF). Beehive.govt.nz. October 2014. Retrieved 23 October 2014. 
  22. ^ "Meet the NZHistory web team". NZHistory. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. 16 Apr 2014. Retrieved 26 June 2014. 
  23. ^ "New research: How many New Zealanders served on Gallipoli?". New Zealand Defence Force. September 3, 2013. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 

External links[edit]