Minnesota Law Review

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Minnesota Law Review  
Abbreviated title (ISO 4)
Minn. Law Rev.
Discipline Law review
Language English
Publication details
Publisher
University of Minnesota Law School (United States)
Publication history
1917-present
Frequency 6/year
Indexing
ISSN 0026-5535
LCCN 18014798
OCLC no. 1758198
Links

The Minnesota Law Review is a law review published by students at University of Minnesota Law School. The journal is published six times a year in November, December, February, April, May, and June. It was established by Henry J. Fletcher and William Reynolds Vance in 1917. The Minnesota Law Review's alumni include William C. Canby, Jr., Donald M. Fraser, Orville Freeman, Bill Luther, George MacKinnon, Walter Mondale, Diana E. Murphy, William Prosser, Ernest Gellhorn, Richard Maxwell, Maynard Pirsig, Daniel D. Polsby, Robert Kingsley, Harold Stassen, and Arthur Whitney of Dorsey & Whitney. Other alumni include judges Donald D. Alsop, David S. Doty, Richard H. Kyle, and John R. Tunheim, all of the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota; Carlton Calvin, founder of Razor USA and the Razor (scooter); Phil Carruthers, former speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives; former New Hampshire Governor Charles M. Dale; current Ramsey County Attorney Susan Gaertner; John Mooty, Melvin Mooty, and Frank Plant, all of Gray Plant Mooty; and Robert Stein, former executive director of the American Bar Association.

Significant articles[edit]

[according to whom?]

  • Kamisar, Yale (1958). "Some Non-Religious Views against Proposed Mercy-Killing Legislation". Minnesota Law Review 42 (6): 969. 
  • Prosser, William L. (1966). "The Fall of the Citadel (Strict Liability to the Consumer)". Minnesota Law Review 50: 791. 
  • Amsterdam, Anthony G. (1974). "Perspectives on the Fourth Amendment". Minnesota Law Review 58: 349. 
  • Muris, Timothy J. (1980). "Opportunistic Behavior and the Law of Contracts". Minnesota Law Review 65: 521. 
  • Harris, David A. (1999). "Stories, the Statistics, and the Law: Why ‘Driving While Black’ Matters". Minnesota Law Review 84 (2): 265–325. 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]