Minnesota State Highway 96

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Trunk Highway 96 marker

Trunk Highway 96
Route information
Defined by MS § 161.115(27)
Maintained by Mn/DOT
Length: 10.179 mi[2] (16.382 km)
Existed: 1933[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: US 61.svg U.S. 61 at White Bear Lake
East end: MN-95.svg MN 95 at Stillwater
Location
Counties: Ramsey, Washington
Highway system
  • Minnesota Trunk Highways
MN 95 MN 97

Minnesota State Highway 96 (MN 96) is a highway in Minnesota that runs from its intersection with U.S. Highway 61 in White Bear Lake and continues east to its eastern terminus at its intersection with State Highway 95 on the northern edge of Stillwater.

It is also known as Dellwood Road in the communities of Dellwood, Grant, and Stillwater Township. The route is also known briefly as Lake Avenue North within the city of White Bear Lake.

Many people in the area still think of Highway 96 in two sections: 1) this eastern portion that remains a State Highway and 2) the western portion that is now known as Ramsey County Highway 96.[1] The two portions were never aligned, but were always about a mile apart, with the western portion about a mile south of the eastern portion.

Route description[edit]

State Highway 96 serves as an east–west arterial route between the communities of White Bear Lake, Dellwood, Grant, Stillwater Township, and Stillwater.

The route is legally defined as Legislative Route 96 in the Minnesota Statutes.[3]

History[edit]

Highway 96 was authorized in 1933. It was paved east of U.S. 61 at the time the highway was marked.[4] The part of the highway between U.S. 8 and U.S. 61 was completely paved by 1935.[5]

From 1934 to 1994, State Highway 96 included the western portion that is now known as Ramsey County Highway 96.,[1] which extended farther west several miles through the communities of Vadnais Heights, Shoreview, and Arden Hills. The former western terminus for State Highway 96 during this time period was at its intersection with old U.S. Highway 8 (near I-35W) on the Arden Hills / New Brighton border. This section of Highway 96 was once part of the Highway 100 Beltway circling the entire Twin Cities during the 1940s and 1950s.

The western portion of Highway 96 between Highway 61 at White Bear Lake and Old Highway 8 at Arden Hills is now known as Ramsey County Highway 96.[1]

A few people in the area still remember stories of how the western portion of Highway 96 was first built across the south arm of Birch Lake the 1930s in White Bear Township. Most now only see that part of the lake as a pond to the south and a marshland to the north, but that's the result of major landfill projects that began in the 1930s and continued in road-widening projects through the 1990s. Local farmer and machinist Con Heckel told of more than one 1930s construction company that went out of business in the process.[6] The old roads had gone around the lakes, but the new ones like Highway 96 were built straight over them.

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[2] km Destinations Notes
Ramsey White Bear Lake 9.357 15.059 US 61
10.189 16.398 CR 89 (Northwest Avenue)
White Bear Township 10.259 16.510 County 71.png CR 71 (Portland Avenue)
Washington Dellwood 10.582 17.030 MN 244
Grant 13.669 21.998 County 9 (Jamaca Avenue)
16.737 26.936 County 15 (Manning Avenue)
Stillwater Township 18.395 29.604 CR 55 (Norell Avenue)
18.465 29.717 County 5 (Stonebridge Trail)
Stillwater 19.484 31.356 County 11 (Boom Road)
19.561 31.480 MN 95 (Main Street)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Riner, Steve. "Details of Routes 76-100". The Unofficial Minnesota Highways Page. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  2. ^ a b "Trunk Highway Log Point Listing - Construction District 5" (PDF). Minnesota Department of Transportation. August 20, 2010. Retrieved November 14, 2010. 
  3. ^ "161.115, Additional Trunk Highways". Minnesota Statutes. Office of the Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota. 2010. Retrieved November 13, 2010. 
  4. ^ Minnesota Highway Department (May 1, 1934). 1934 Map of Trunk Highway System, State of Minnesota (Map). Section U1. http://reflections.mndigital.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/mdt&CISOPTR=210&DMSCALE=50&DMWIDTH=800&DMHEIGHT=800&DMX=4235.5&DMY=0&DMMODE=viewer&DMTEXT=&REC=15&DMTHUMB=1&DMROTATE=0. Retrieved November 14, 2010.
  5. ^ Minnesota Highway Department (April 1, 1935). 1935 Map of Trunk Highway System, State of Minnesota (Map). Section T1. http://reflections.mndigital.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/mdt&CISOPTR=211&DMSCALE=50&DMWIDTH=800&DMHEIGHT=800&DMX=3800&DMY=260&DMMODE=viewer&DMTEXT=&REC=16&DMTHUMB=1&DMROTATE=0. Retrieved November 14, 2010.
  6. ^ Slocum, Scott (1975). "Con Heckel: personal communication".