Minuscule 398

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New Testament manuscripts
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Minuscule 398
Text Acts, Paul
Date 10th century
Script Greek
Now at Cambridge University Library
Size 17.7 cm by 12.2 cm
Type eclectic
Category III/V

Minuscule 398 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), α 398 (Soden),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Paleographically it has been assigned to the 10th century.[2] Formerly it was designated by 9a and 11p.[3]

Description[edit]

The codex contains the text of the Acts of the Apostles, General epistles, and Pauline epistles on 251 parchment leaves (17.7 cm by 12.2 cm) with lacunae (Acts 3:6-17; 1 Timothy 4:12-2 Timothy 4:3; Hebrews 7:20-11:10; 11:23-13:25). It is written in one column per page, in 22 lines per page.[2][3]

Text[edit]

The Greek text of the codex is a representative of the Byzantine text-type with exception for the General epistles. Aland placed it in Category V (except General epistles). The text of General epistles Aland assigned to the Category III.[4]

Aland gave for it the following textual profile: Acts 751 281/2 42 1s, Cath 621 71/2 162 13s, Paul 1581 481/2 32 0S.[4]

1: agreements with the Byzantine text
1/2: agreements with the Byzantine text where it has the same reading as the original text
2: agreements with the original text
S: independent or distinctive readings ("Sonderlesarten").[5]

History[edit]

Gregory dated it to the 11th or 12th century.[3] Currently it is dated by the INTF to the 10th century.[2]

The manuscript once belonged to François Vatable, friend of Robert Estienne and professor of Hebrew in Paris. The manuscript probably was used in Editio Regia as ιγ'.[3][6] It was slightly examined by Scholz, who catalogued it twice (as 9a and 112a). Fenton Hort examined Catholic epistles. C. R. Gregory saw it in 1886.[3] In 1908 Gregory gave for it number 398.[7]

In the 18th century it was used as an argument against the authenticity of the Comma Johanneum.[8]

Formerly it was designated by 9a and 11p.[3] In 1908 Gregory gave the number 398 to it.[1]

The manuscript is currently housed at the Cambridge University Library (Kk. 6.4) in Cambridge.[2]

Former 398[edit]

Formerly number 398 (Scholz) belonged to a commentary housed in the Turin National University Library (C. II. 5). It contains 310 leaves (31.1 by 21.8 cm), written in 2 columns and 30 lines per page, dated to the 13th century. Gregory saw it in 1886. In 1908 Gregory removed it from the list of the New Testament manuscripts because it is rather a commentary, with incomplete text of the Gospels.[7] It was examined and described by Giuseppe Passini (as 109).[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung. p. 62. 
  2. ^ a b c d Aland, K.; M. Welte; B. Köster; K. Junack (1994). Kurzgefasste Liste der griechischen Handschriften des Neues Testaments. Berlin, New York: Walter de Gruyter. p. 70. ISBN 3-11-011986-2. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments 1. Leipzig: Hinrichs. p. 263. 
  4. ^ a b Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 132. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 
  5. ^ Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 107. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 
  6. ^ Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edwqard Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament 1 (4 ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. p. 284. 
  7. ^ a b Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J.C. Hinrichs’sche Buchhandlung. p. 62. 
  8. ^ George Travis, Letters to Edward Gibbon: author of the History of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, 3rd edition, (London 1794), p. 410.
  9. ^ Giuseppe Pasino, Codices Manuscripti Bibliohecae Regii Taurinensis Athenaei, Turin 1742, Teil 2.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]