Minuscule 505

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New Testament manuscripts
papyriuncialsminusculeslectionaries
Minuscule 505
Harleian 5538, folio 174.jpg
Name Beginning of the Gospel of John, with the decorated headpiece
Text Gospels
Date 12th-century
Script Greek
Now at British Library
Size 12.5 cm by 9.2 cm
Type Byzantine text-type
Category V
Note incomplete marginalia

Minuscule 505 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 248 (in the Soden numbering),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 12th-century.[2] Scrivener labelled it by number 567. The manuscript has complex contents. It was adapted for liturgical use.

Description[edit]

The codex contains the complete text of the four Gospels on 226 parchment leaves (size 12.5 cm by 9.2 cm),[2] with 3 modern paper fly-leaves.[3] It is written in one column per page, 23 lines per page.[4] The text is divided according to the Ammonian Sections, (no references to the Eusebian Canons). It contains lectionary markings at the margin (for liturgical use).[4][5]

Headpieces ornamented with geometric and foliate decoration, titles are written in uncials in colours (folios 1, 65, 105, 174). Decorated initial letters in red.[3] The manuscript was decorated by two artists.[4] The first artist decorated folio 1, a second artist decorated folios 65, 105 and 174 (see image). The text has not liturgical signs.[3]

Text[edit]

The Greek text of the codex is a representative of the Byzantine text-type. Hermann von Soden included it to the textual family Kx.[6] Aland placed it in Category V.[7] According to the Claremont Profile Method it represents the textual family Kx in Luke 1 and Luke 20. In Luke 10 it has mixed Byzantine text.[6]

History[edit]

Scrivener dated the manuscript to the 14th-century,[4] Gregory dated it to the 12th-century.[5] Currently it is dated by the INTF to the 12th-century.[2]

According to the inscription on folio 64 verso It was once in Genoa. It belonged to John Gibson, a dealer, who sold it for Edward Harley in 1733.[3]

The manuscript was examined by Scholz and wrongly classified by him as Evangelistarium with the number 149 on his list. The manuscript was examined by Scrivener and Gregory.[5] The manuscript was rebound in 1962.[3]

It was added to the list of the New Testament manuscripts by Scrivener (567) and C. R. Gregory (505).[4] Gregory saw it in 1883.[5]

It is currently housed at the British Library (Harley 5538) in London.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung. p. 66. 
  2. ^ a b c d Aland, K.; M. Welte; B. Köster; K. Junack (1994). Kurzgefasste Liste der griechischen Handschriften des Neues Testaments. Berlin, New York: Walter de Gruyter. p. 77. ISBN 3-11-011986-2. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Harleian 5538 at the British Library
  4. ^ a b c d e Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edward Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament 1 (4th ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. p. 256. 
  5. ^ a b c d Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testamentes 1. Leipzig: J.C. Hinrichs'sche Buchahndlung. p. 197. 
  6. ^ a b Wisse, Frederik (1982). The Profile Method for the Classification and Evaluation of Manuscript Evidence, as Applied to the Continuous Greek Text of the Gospel of Luke. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 61. ISBN 0-8028-1918-4. 
  7. ^ Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 139. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 

Further reading[edit]

  • A Catalogue of the Harleian Manuscripts, in the British Museum, 4 vols (London: [n. pub.], 1808–12), III (1808), no. 5538.
  • Summary Catalogue of Greek Manuscripts (London: British Library, 1999- ), I, p. 103 [with further bibliography].

External links[edit]