Minuscule 617

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Minuscule 617
New Testament manuscript
Text New Testament (except Gospels) †
Date 11th century
Script Greek
Now at Biblioteca Marciana
Size 30 cm by 23 cm
Type mixed
Category none
Note marginalia

Minuscule 617 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), O 13 (von Soden),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 11th century.[2] The manuscript is lacunose. Tischendorf labeled it by 140a, 215p, and 74r.[3]

Description[edit]

The codex contains the text of the New Testament except Gospels on 164 parchment leaves (size 30 cm by 23 cm), with two large lacunae (Acts 1:8-29:12; Galatians 2:21-1 Timothy 4:10). The lacking texts were supplemented by two hands on paper in the 13th century. The text is written in two columns per page, 31 lines per page.[2]

It contains Prolegomena, στιχοι, some notes to the Acts, and numerous notes to the Pauline and Catholic epistles.[4][3] It has Euthalian Apparatus, but incomplete.[4] The text of Epistles is surrounded by a catena, the Apocalypse has a commentary.[3]

It contains treatise of Pseudo-Dorotheus on the Seventy disciples and twelve apostles (as codices 82, 93, 177, 459, 614, 699).[4]

The order of books: Acts of the Apostles, Pauline epistles, Catholic epistles, and Book of Revelation. Hebrews is placed after Epistle to Philemon.[4]

Text[edit]

Kurt Aland did not place the Greek text of the codex in any Category.[5]

History[edit]

The manuscript belonged to the metropolitan of Ephesus Neophytus in 1481. It was bought for the library in "Gallicio" in 1624.[4]

The manuscript was added to the list of New Testament manuscripts by Johann Martin Augustin Scholz. Gregory saw the manuscript in 1886.[4] The text of the Apocalypse was collated by Herman C. Hoskier.[6]

Formerly it was labeled by 140a, 215p, and 74r. In 1908 Gregory gave the number 617 to it.[1]

The manuscript currently is housed at the Biblioteca Marciana (Gr. Z. 546 (786)), at Venice.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung. p. 69. 
  2. ^ a b c K. Aland, M. Welte, B. Köster, K. Junack, "Kurzgefasste Liste der griechischen Handschriften des Neues Testaments", Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York 1994, p. 83.
  3. ^ a b c Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edward Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament 1 (4 ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. p. 294. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments 1. Leipzig: Hinrichs. p. 276. 
  5. ^ Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 139. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 
  6. ^ Herman C. Hoskier, Concerning the Text of the Apocalypse: Collation of All Existing Available Greek Documents with the Standard Text of Stephen’s Third Edition Together with the Testimony of Versions, Commentaries and Fathers. 1 vol. (London: Bernard Quaritch, Ltd., 1929), pp. 238-239.

Further reading[edit]

  • Herman C. Hoskier, Concerning the Text of the Apocalypse: Collation of All Existing Available Greek Documents with the Standard Text of Stephen’s Third Edition Together with the Testimony of Versions, Commentaries and Fathers. 1 vol. (London: Bernard Quaritch, Ltd., 1929), pp. 238-239.

External links[edit]