Mirza Nali

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Mirza Nali
Birth name: Mirza Muhammad Nali
Family name: Timurid / gurkhan
Title: Prince of Mughal Empire
Birth: 2 November 1784
Death: 8 October 1860
Succeeded by: Jalaluddin Mirza
Marriage:

Rukhsana

Children:

Mirza Mubarak, son
Mirza Abu Bakr, son
Mirza Jalaluddin, son

Mirza Nali (born Mirza Mohammad Nali, Shahzada (Begzada) of the Mughal Kingdom 1784-1860), was the Crown Prince before Bahadur Shah II.[1] He was the son of Akbar Shah II who became an outlaw after the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857. He took refuge in parts of Hindustan.

Akbar Shah Badshah died in the evening on 28 September 1837. Abu Zafar Sirajuddin Mohammed Bahadur Shah Badshah Gazi ascended the throne of Delhi. Bahadur Shah was born in the Islamic Hijra Year of 1188 (1777) and at the time of his enthronement he was 60 years of age. He was a very modest, well spoken, Sufi poet. His father had tried to pass on the title to his younger brother Mirza Salim also known as Mirza Jahangir. However, Mirza Salim hated the British and called the Resident Stein by the mocking name of “Lulu”. He also shot at the resident and as a consequence was exiled to Allahabad. The British as a result were opposed to making Mirza Jahangir the Crown Prince. After that Shah Alam Badshah tried to make Mirza Nali the Crown Prince, this too failed and in the end Bahadur Shah ascended the throne.

His descendants are still living in Allahabad and Bangladesh.

It is said that certain members still own large amounts of land and hold styled titles from their association with rulers of other Princely States, such as that of Bengal.

Mirza Nali
Born: 2 November 1784 Died: 6 October 1860
Titles in pretence
Preceded by
Akbar Shah II
'— TITULAR —
GurkhaneMirza

Prince of the Imperial Mughal Line
Mirza Nali
1784–1860

Succeeded by
Jalaluddin Mirza

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Agony of Delhi by Khwaja Hasan Nizami Published for the 2nd time in 1922 by Ibn Arbi
  • The Eighth Section of the Series on the Mutiny in Delhi, Khwaja Hasan Nizami[1]