Miss Silver

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Miss Silver is a fictional detective featured in 32 novels by British novelist Patricia Wentworth.

Character[edit]

Miss Maud Silver is a retired governess-turned-private detective. Like Miss Marple, Miss Silver's age and demeanor make her appear harmless. Some admire the character, believing that "while Miss Marple may receive ten times the attention as Miss Silver, ... the woefully neglected Miss Silver is the real deal - a professional investigator and a stand-up woman, a true forerunner of all future female private eyes."[1] Others disagree, claiming that the character "has none of the credibility of ... Miss Marple.... Her spinsterish appearance is inconsistent with her sensational behavior and also with the far-fetched plots of the novels she features in."[2]

Novels[edit]

  • Grey Mask, 1928
  • The Case is Closed, 1937
  • Lonesome Road, 1939
  • Danger Point (U.S. title: In the Balance), 1941
  • The Chinese Shawl, 1943
  • Miss Silver Intervenes (U.S. title: Miss Silver Deals with Death), 1943
  • The Clock Strikes Twelve, 1944
  • The Key, 1944
  • The Traveller Returns (U.S. title: She Came Back), 1945
  • Pilgrim's Rest (also published as Dark Threat), 1946
  • Latter End, 1947
  • Spotlight (U.S. title: Wicked Uncle), 1947
  • Eternity Ring, 1948
  • The Case of William Smith, 1948
  • Miss Silver Comes to Stay, 1949
  • The Catherine Wheel, 1949
  • Through the Wall, 1950
  • The Brading Collection (also published as Mr. Brading's Collection), 1950
  • The Ivory Dagger, 1951
  • Anna, Where Are You? (also published as Death at Deep End), 1951
  • The Watersplash, 1951
  • Ladies' Bane, 1952
  • Out of the Past, 1953
  • Vanishing Point, 1953
  • The Silent Pool, 1954
  • The Benevent Treasure, 1953
  • The Listening Eye, 1955
  • Poison in the Pen, 1955
  • The Gazebo (also published as The Summerhouse), 1956
  • The Fingerprint, 1956
  • The Alington Inheritance, 1958
  • The Girl in the Cellar, 1961

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ D. L. Browne, quoted in Stoyer.
  2. ^ Shaw and Vanacker (1991), 36.

References[edit]