Mississauga South

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For the provincial electoral district, see Mississauga South (provincial electoral district).
Mississauga South
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario electoral district
Mississauga South.png
Mississauga South in relation to the other Toronto area ridings
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Stella Ambler
Conservative
District created 1976
First contested 1979
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 112,583
Electors (2011) 77,479
Area (km²)[2] 57.39
Pop. density (per km²) 1,961.7
Census divisions Peel
Census subdivisions Mississauga
Map of Mississauga South
Federal election results, 1979-2008

Mississauga South is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1979.

It includes the neighbourhoods of Cawthra, Sheridan Heights, Park Royal, Clarkson, Rattray Park Estates, Lorne Park, Lorne Park Estates, Port Credit, Applewood Acres, Lakeview and Orchard Heights. It has a population of 113,003 and an area of 61 km2.

In 2003, it was defined to consist of the part of the City of Mississauga lying southeast of a line drawn from northeast to southwest along the Queensway to the Credit River, west along the Credit River, and southwest along Dundas Street West to the southwestern city limit.

Political geography[edit]

Conservative support is centred in the interior of the riding, particularly in the upscale Lorne Park area, while the Liberals and the NDP tend to do better along the waterfront of the riding, such as Port Credit and Lakeview, and the eastern and western edges of the riding.

History[edit]

The federal riding was created in 1976 from parts of Mississauga and Mississauga Centre ridings.

It consisted initially of the part of the City of Mississauga lying south of a line drawn from west to east along Highway 5, south along Cawthra Road, and east along the Queen Elizabeth Way.

In 1987, it was redefined to consist of the part of the City of Mississauga lying south of a line drawn from southwest to northeast along Dundas Street West, east along the Credit River, northeast along the Queen Elizabeth Way, northwest along Cawthra Road, and northeast along the Queensway East to the eastern city limit.

In 1996, it was redefined to consist of the part of the City of Mississauga lying south of a line drawn from southwest to northeast along Dundas Street West, southeast along Erin Mills Parkway, northeast along the Queen Elizabeth Way, northwest along Hurontario Street, northeast along the Queensway East to the northeastern city limit.

In 2003, it was given its current boundaries as described above.

Electoral history[edit]

The Mississauga South riding and its precursors, while being more competitive than in provincial elections, still has a generally conservative history, and despite voting Liberal since 1993, could be described as a small "c" conservative riding. The Progressive Conservatives held the riding from creation its first election in 1979 under Don Blenkarn, (who served as MP for Peel South, one of the precursor ridings between 1972–1974), until 1993, when he was defeated by Paul Szabo. With the exception of the 1988 election, Szabo has been the Liberal candidate in every election since 1980 (an election he almost won.)

The riding voting Liberal in 1993 can in part be blamed by vote splitting on the right, as Blenkarn was knocked into third place by the Reform Party candidate, although both were far behind Szabo, who only marginally improved on the Liberal performance from 1988, winning 37%, only 2% more than the 1988 Liberal result, and less than the combined vote total for the two right-wing parties. Szabo however greatly increased his percentage of the vote in the elections afterward, winning over 50% in every election from 1997–2004, despite facing a united right-wing vote in 2004.

In the 2006 election Szabo and the Liberals were re-elected again, however the Liberal vote dropped sharply, with the Conservatives coming within 5% of winning the riding, getting 40% of the vote, one of the best performances for them in the Greater Toronto Area. The riding was generally assumed to be a top Tory target for the next election, however, the drawn out and somewhat acrimonious nature of the Conservative nomination process, and Szabo's increased profile as a result of his chairmanship of the House of Commons Ethics committee may have damaged Conservative attempts to capture the riding. Despite the Conservatives strengthening in the 2008 election overall, Arrison was unable to defeat Szabo, and Mississauga South was one of the few ridings outside Quebec where the Liberal Party increased the percentage of the vote received from 2006 (albeit very slightly).

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following members of the Canadian House of Commons:

Parliament Years Member Party
Mississauga South
Riding created from Mississauga and Mississauga Centre
31st  1979 − 1980     Don Blenkarn Progressive Conservative
32nd  1980 − 1984
33rd  1984 − 1988
34th  1988 − 1993
35th  1993 − 1997     Paul Szabo Liberal
36th  1997 − 2000
37th  2000 − 2004
38th  2004 − 2006
39th  2006 − 2008
40th  2008 − 2011
41st  2011 − Present     Stella Ambler Conservative

Election results[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Stella Ambler 22,991 46.48 +6.90
Liberal Paul Szabo 18,393 37.18 -7.04
New Democratic Farah Kalbouneh 6,354 12.85 +4.01
Green Paul Simas 1,532 3.10 -4.24
Independent Richard Barrett 194 0.39
Total valid votes 49,464 100.00
Total rejected ballots 188 0.38 +0.05
Turnout 49,652 63.89 +3.81
Eligible voters 77,716
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Paul Szabo 20,518 44.22 +0.3 $70,011
Conservative Hugh Arrison 18,366 39.58 -0.2 $81,878
New Democratic Matt Turner 4,104 8.84 -2.5 $1,722
Green Richard Laushway 3,407 7.34 +1.8 $9,008
Total valid votes/Expense limit 46,395 100.00 $84,179
Total rejected ballots 155 0.33
Turnout 46,550 60.08
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Paul Szabo 22,975 43.9 -7.8
Conservative Phil Green 20,827 39.8 +6.2
New Democratic Mark De Pelham 5,898 11.3 +0.8
Green Brendan Tarry 2,377 4.5 +0.5
Canadian Action Paul McMurray 129 0.2
Marxist–Leninist Dagmar Sullivan 74 0.1
Total valid votes 52,280 100.0
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Paul Szabo 24,628 51.7 -0.1
Conservative Phil Green 16,027 33.6 -9.0
New Democratic Michael James Culkin 5,004 10.5 +6.4
Green Neeraj Jain 1,899 4.0 +2.7
Marxist–Leninist Dagmar Sullivan 107 0.2 +0.1
Total valid votes 47,665 100.0

Note: Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.

Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Paul Szabo 20,676 51.8 +1.8
Alliance Brad Butt 10,139 25.4 +5.8
Progressive Conservative David Brown 6,903 17.3 -6.4
New Democratic Ken Cole 1,636 4.1 -1.3
Green Pamela Murray 516 1.3
Marxist–Leninist Tim Sullivan 67 0.2 0.0
Total valid votes 39,937 100.0

Note: Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.

Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Paul Szabo 21,207 49.9 +3.4
Progressive Conservative Dick Barr 10,077 23.7 +0.4
Reform Joe Peschisolido 8,307 19.6 -5.6
New Democratic Jessica Lott 2,302 5.4 +3.3
Natural Law Scott Kay 199 0.5 0.0
Canadian Action Aaron Gervais 150 0.4
Independent Adrian Earl Crewson 141 0.3
Marxist–Leninist Dagmar Sullivan 79 0.2 +0.1
Total valid votes 42,462 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Paul Szabo 21,480 46.6 +11.9
Reform John Veenstra 11,591 25.1
Progressive Conservative Don Blenkarn 10,763 23.3 -28.6
New Democratic Lili V. Weemen 988 2.1 -9.8
National Albina Burello 452 1.0
Libertarian Richard Barrett 429 0.9 +0.3
Natural Law Jeffrey graduate Dods 234 0.5
Independent Michael John Charette 124 0.3
Marxist–Leninist Dagmar Sullivan 49 0.1
Total valid votes 46,110 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Don Blenkarn 24,482 51.9 -4.5
Liberal Gil Gillespie 16,362 34.7 +5.8
New Democratic Sue Craig 5,643 12.0 -2.7
Rhinoceros Marc Currie 332 0.7
Libertarian Vay Jonynas 297 0.6
Commonwealth of Canada Patrick Descoteaux 59 0.1
Total valid votes 47,175 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Don Blenkarn 32,946 56.4 +15.0
Liberal Paul Szabo 16,874 28.9 -11.6
New Democratic Norm Jones 8,584 14.7 -2.1
Total valid votes 58,404 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1980
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Don Blenkarn 21,480 41.4 -7.5
Liberal Paul Szabo 21,007 40.5 +6.4
New Democratic Neil Davis 8,711 16.8 +0.6
Libertarian Ian F. Darwin 405 0.8 +0.4
Independent Tom Smith 110 0.2 0.0
Independent Michael John Charette 78 0.2
Marxist–Leninist Tim Sullivan 31 0.1 -0.1
Total valid votes 51,822 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive Conservative Don Blenkarn 26,802 48.9
Liberal Peg Holloway 18,710 34.1
New Democratic Colin Baynes 8,869 16.2
Libertarian Robert Sproule 236 0.4
Independent Tom Smith 104 0.2
Marxist–Leninist Barbara Nunn 74 0.1
Total valid votes 54,795 100.0

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°36′N 79°36′W / 43.6°N 79.6°W / 43.6; -79.6