1930 Mitropa Cup

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Mitropa Cup 1930
Participating Nations
 Austria
 Hungary
 Czechoslovakia
 Italy
Number of clubs
8
Champions
Rapid Vienna

The 1930 season of the Mitropa Cup football club tournament was won by Rapid Vienna in a two-legged final against Sparta Prague. This was the fourth edition of the tournament, and the second edition in which Italian clubs competed and Yugoslavian clubs did not compete.

The holders, Újpesti FC, lost in the quarter final against AS Ambrosiana, which is now called F.C. Internazionale Milano.

The final was played on November 2 and November 12, 1930 in Prague und Vienna. The finalists Sparta Prague and Rapid Vienna had played against each other in the Mitropa Cup 1927 final, with Sparta winning on aggegrate 7-3. Rapid were playing in their third Mitropa Cup final in four years. Sparta lost at home 0-2, the first away victory in a Mitropa Cup final. Their 3-2 away win, the second away victory in a Mitropa Cup final, meant that Rapid became the first Austrian club to win this tournament. Giuseppe Meazza from AS Ambrosia was top scorer in the tournament with seven goals. Josef Košťálek scored all three of Sparta Prague's goals in the final.

The semi-finals and both legs of the final were refereed by Sophus Hansen of Denmark.

Quarterfinals[edit]

Team #1 Agg. Team #2 1st leg 2nd leg
Slavia Prague Czechoslovakia 2 - 3 Hungary Ferencvárosi TC 2 - 2 0 - 1
Sparta Prague Czechoslovakia 5 - 3 Austria First Vienna FC 2 - 1 3 - 2
Genova 1893 Circolo del Calcio Italy 2 - 7 Austria SK Rapid Wien 1 - 1 1 - 6
Újpest FC Hungary 6 - 6 Italy AS Ambrosiana 2 - 4 4 - 2

Playoff between Újpest FC and AS Ambrosiana resulted in a 1-1 draw after extra time.

Second playoff between Újpest FC and AS Ambrosiana resulted in a 5-3 victory for AS Ambrosiana

Semifinals[edit]

Team #1 Agg. Team #2 1st leg 2nd leg
AS Ambrosiana Italy 3 - 8 Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 2 - 2 1 - 6
SK Rapid Wien Austria 5 - 2 Hungary Ferencvárosi TC 5 - 1 0 - 1

Finals[edit]

Team #1 Agg. Team #2 1st leg 2nd leg
Sparta Prague Czechoslovakia 3 - 4 Austria SK Rapid Wien 0 - 2 3 - 2

1st leg[edit]

November 2, 1930
Sparta 0 – 2[1][2] Rapid
Luef Goal 9'
Wesely Goal 57'
Stadion Letná (Praha)
Attendance: 25,000
Referee: Sophus Hansen (Denmark)
ATHLETIC CLUB SPARTA:
GK Czech Republic Ladislav Bělík
DF Czech Republic Jaroslav Burgr
DF Czech Republic Antonín Hojer
MF Czech Republic Madelon
MF Czech Republic Káďa (c)
MF Czech Republic Erich Srbek
FW Austria Adolf Patek
FW Czech Republic Josef Košťálek
FW Belgium Raymond Braine
FW Czech Republic Josef Silný
FW Czech Republic Karel Hejma
Manager:
Scotland John Dick
SPORTKLUB RAPID:
GK Austria Josef Bugala
DF Austria Roman Schramseis
DF Austria Leopold Czejka
MF Austria Karl Rappan
MF Austria Josef Smistik
MF Austria Johann Vana
FW Austria Willibald Kirbes
FW Austria Franz Weselik
FW Austria Matthias Kaburek
FW Austria Johann Luef
FW Austria Ferdinand Wesely (c)
Manager:
Austria Edi Bauer

2nd leg[edit]

November 11, 1930
Rapid 2 – 3[1][2] Sparta
Kaburek Goal 7'
Smistik Goal 67'
Košťálek Goal 25'27'87'
Hohe Warte (Wien)
Attendance: 40,000
Referee: Sophus Hansen (Denmark)
SPORTKLUB RAPID:
GK Austria Josef Bugala
DF Austria Roman Schramseis
DF Austria Leopold Czejka
MF Austria Karl Rappan
MF Austria Josef Smistik
MF Austria Johann Vana
FW Austria Willibald Kirbes
FW Austria Franz Weselik
FW Austria Matthias Kaburek
FW Austria Johann Luef
FW Austria Ferdinand Wesely (c)
Manager:
Austria Edi Bauer
ATHLETIC CLUB SPARTA:
GK Czech Republic Ladislav Bělík
DF Czech Republic Jaroslav Burgr
DF Czech Republic Josef Čtyřoký
MF Czech Republic Madelon
MF Czech Republic Káďa (c)
MF Czech Republic Erich Srbek
FW Czech Republic Karel Podrazil
FW Czech Republic Josef Košťálek
FW Belgium Raymond Braine
FW Czech Republic Josef Silný
FW Czech Republic Karel Hejma
Manager:
Scotland John Dick

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Line ups". rapidarchiv.at. Retrieved 28 October 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Line ups". iffhs.de. Retrieved 28 October 2012. 

External links[edit]