Miyagiyama Fukumatsu

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Miyagiyama Fukumatsu
宮城山 福松
The 29th Yokozuna Miyagiyama Fukumatsu.jpg
Personal information
Born Fukumatsu Sato
(1895-02-27)February 27, 1895
Iwate, Japan
Died November 19, 1943(1943-11-19) (aged 48)
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Weight 113 kg (249 lb)
Career
Stable Takadagawa
Record 90-69-38-1draw (Makuuchi)
Debut June 1910
Highest rank Yokozuna (February, 1922)
Retired January 1931
Championships 2 (Makuuchi, official)
4 (Osaka Makuuchi, unofficial)
* Up to date as of October 2007.

Miyagiyama Fukumatsu (宮城山 福松, February 27, 1895 – November 19, 1943) was a sumo wrestler from Ichinoseki, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. He was the sport's 29th yokozuna. He was the last yokozuna in Osaka sumo.

Career[edit]

In the fall of 1909, he joined Dewanoumi stable. He made his professional debut in June 1910. However, he was punched by Kyushuzan Juro and escaped from Tokyo sumo in May 1912. He didn't abandon the idea of becoming a wrestler and moved to Osaka sumo.

He reached the top makuuchi division in 1916 and he was promoted to ōzeki after only 2 tournaments. In January 1920, he won his first championship with an 8-1-1draw record. In March 1921, he fought against wrestlers in Tokyo sumo and defeated sekiwake Genjiyama, ozeki Tsunenohana, yokozuna Ōnishiki and Kyushuzan. Around this time he reconciled with Kyushuzan.

In June 1921, he won the championship with an 8-2 record. In January 1922, he won the championship with a perfect 10-0 record. After winning two consecutive championships, he was awarded a yokozuna licence. He was absent from two tournaments in 1923 due to a phlegmon on his right hand's middle finger. In January 1926, he won the championship with a 9-1 record.

In 1927, Osaka Sumo Association disbanded and its wrestlers merged with Tokyo sumo. At that time, Osaka sumo's level was very low and he was not considered not to be strong enough.[1] However, he felt he had to save the honor of Osaka sumo as yokozuna. Although his strength had already declined, he fought tooth and nail and won 2 championships in Tokyo sumo after Osaka sumo has been disbanded . The first of these, in January 1927, was the first tournament to be held under the auspices of the Dai Nihon Ozumo Kyokai (now the Japan Sumo Association). Considering that he had been retained as a yokozuna simply because there was no precedent for demoting one and to allow Osaka sumo to save face, it was regarded as a sensational result.[1]

After his retirement, he became the 6th head coach of Shibatayama stable. The stable was closed after his death. Afterward, the 62nd yokozuna Ōnokuni became the 12th holder of the Shibatayama name and he opened the modern Shibatayama stable.

Osaka sumo top division record[edit]

  • Osaka sumo existed independently for many years before merging with Tokyo sumo in 1926. 1-2 tournaments were held yearly, though the actual time they were held was often erratic.
Miyagiyama Fukumatsu[2]
First Second
1916 x East Maegashira #7
8–1
1h

 
1917 East Sekiwake
8–1
1h

 
West Ōzeki
8–1
1h

 
1918 Sat out West Ōzeki
8–2
 
1919 East Ōzeki
6–3
1h

 
East Ōzeki
7–2–1
 
1920 East Ōzeki
8–1
1d
Unofficial

 
West Ōzeki
6–3
1d

 
1921 West Ōzeki
2–4–3
1d

 
West Ōzeki
8–2
Unofficial

 
1922 East Ōzeki
10–0
Unofficial

 
East Yokozuna
7–1
2d

 
1923 Sat out Sat out
1924 East Yokozuna
2–0–8
 
Sat out
1925 East Yokozuna
4–2–3
1d

 
East Yokozuna
1–0–9
 
1926 East Yokozuna
9–1
Unofficial

 
Not held
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:  =Kinboshi(s);   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

*Championships for the best record in a tournament were not recognized or awarded in Osaka sumo before its merger with Tokyo sumo, and the unofficial championships above are historically conferred. For more information, see yūshō.

Merged sumo top division record[edit]

  • In 1927 Tokyo and Osaka sumo merged and four tournaments a year in Tokyo and other locations began to be held.
Miyagiyama Fukumatsu[3]
- Spring
Haru basho, Tokyo
March
Sangatsu basho, varied
Summer
Natsu basho, Tokyo
October
Jūgatsu basho, varied
1927 East Yokozuna
10–1
 
East Yokozuna
7–3–1
1d

 
East Yokozuna
3–3–5
 
West Yokozuna
4–7
 
1928 West Yokozuna
7–4
 
East Yokozuna
7–4
 
East Yokozuna
7–4
 
East Yokozuna
9–2
 
1929 West Yokozuna
1–4–6
 
West Yokozuna
2–3–6
 
West Yokozuna
3–3–5
 
West Yokozuna
8–3
 
1930 West Yokozuna
6–5
 
West Yokozuna
4–7
 
West Yokozuna
6–5
 
West Yokozuna
1–6–4
 
1931 East Yokozuna
5–6
 
East Yokozuna
Retired
0–0
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:  =Kinboshi(s);   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

References in Popular Culture[edit]

Miyagiyama is briefly mentioned in Chapter 17 of Memoirs of a Geisha, when many of the novel's main characters attend a sumo exhibition in Kyoto. He competes in his role as yokozuna, winning his bout by hataki komi (slap down).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Newton, Clyde (1994). Dynamic Sumo. Kodansha. p. 58. ISBN 4-7700-1802-9. 
  2. ^ "Miyagiyama Fukumatsu Rikishi" (in Japanese). 横綱力士幕内星取表. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  3. ^ "Miyagiyama Fukumatsu Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. 

External links[edit]

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Ōnishiki Daigorō
29th Yokozuna
1922 - 1931
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Nishinoumi Kajirō III
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title