Miyako-jima

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Miyako
Native name: Miyakojima (宮古島?)
Miyakojima sky view.jpg
Aerial view of Miyako-jima from northwest.
Miyako-jima is located in Japan
Miyako-jima

Location in Japan
Geography
Location Okinawa Prefecture
Coordinates 24°46′N 125°19′E / 24.767°N 125.317°E / 24.767; 125.317
Archipelago Miyako Islands
Area 158.70 km2 (61.27 sq mi)
Highest elevation 115 m (377 ft)
Highest point Nakao
Country
Japan
Demographics
Population  55,914 (as of 30 October 2006)
Density 275.4 /km2 (713.3 /sq mi)
The location of Miyakojima City in Okinawa

Miyako-jima (宮古島?, Miyako: Myaaku (ミャーク?); Okinawan: Naaku (ナーク?)) is the largest and the most populous island among the Miyako Islands of Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. Miyako-jima is administered as part of the City of Miyakojima, which includes not only Miyako-jima, but also five other populated islands.[1]

Geography[edit]

Miyako-jima lies approximately 300 kilometres (190 mi) southwest of Okinawa Island and 400 kilometres (250 mi) east of Taipei, Taiwan.[1] With an area of 158.70 square kilometres (61.27 sq mi), Miyako is the fourth-largest island in Okinawa Prefecture.[2] The island is triangular in shape and is composed of Ryukyuan limestone.[1] Miyako-jima is subject to drought and is frequently struck by typhoons.[1]

Miyako-jima is well known for its beauty, particularly the Eastern Cape (東平安名岬 Higashi-hennazaki?), which is considered by many as one of the most beautiful spots in Japan. Other notable locations include Maehama beach, the German Cultural Center, Painagama Beach, and the sights on Irabu-jima. There are two islands close by which are connected by bridges to Miyako-jima, Ikemajima (池間島 Ikema-jima?), and Kurimajima (来間島 Kurima-jima?). The Miyako language, one of several Ryukyuan languages, is spoken here.

Culture[edit]

There is a unique festival called Paantu (パーントゥ), which occurs in the ninth month of the old (lunar) calendar. Three men dressed in grasses and mud go about smearing it everywhere. They carry sticks in one hand and a simple but scary mask in the other. Those people who have been dirtied by the Pantu will have a year of protection. Owners of new homes will also invite Pantu to give a 'blessing' to their homes.

Miyako has its own version of soba. Otori is a custom of drinking Awamori, a distilled beverage native to Okinawa Japan. It is performed by people sitting (usually around a table). One offers a toast, drinks from a small glass, and then offers some to each person at the table making a round, and usually going to the right. When the toaster makes his way back to his spot the person who passed the Otori before pours him another glass. He then announces "TSUNAGIMASU" and drinks his second glass. After a brief interval, it is then the turn of the next person to pass the Otori, which continues until the celebration is ended.

Economy[edit]

Miyako-jima is home to sugarcane cultivation, and produces brown sugar.[1] Miyako jōfu is a locally produced hand-woven textile made from ramie fiber. It was formerly known as Satsuma jōfu. The textile traces its production to the Tensho period, 1573-92.[2][3][4]

Points of interest[edit]

Miyako-jima - Higashi-hennazaki

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Miyakojima". Encyclopedia of Japan. Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ a b "宮古島" [Miyako-jima]. Dijitaru Daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Retrieved 2012-12-14. 
  3. ^ "宮古上布" [Miyako jōfu]. Dijitaru Daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Retrieved 2012-12-14. 
  4. ^ "宮古上布" [Miyako jōfu]. Nihon Daihyakka Zensho (Nipponika) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 153301537. Retrieved 2012-12-14. 
  5. ^ "JAL Group Offices Information." Japan Airlines. Retrieved on July 22, 2011. "MIYAKO Only Domestic Ticketing Available Address 223 Nishizato Hirara Miyako City, 906-0012" Map

External links[edit]