Mladen III Šubić of Bribir

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Mladen III Šubić of Bribir
Mladen III Šubić - nadgrobna ploča u Trogirskoj katedrali.jpg
Gravestone in the Trogir Cathedral.
Predecessor Mladen II
Successor Jelena Šubić
Reign 1315 - 1348
House House of Šubić
Father George II
Born Croatia
Burial Trogir Cathedral

Mladen III Šubić of Bribir (Croatian: Mladen III Šubić Bribirski) (c. 1315 – Trogir, 1 May 1348) was a member of the Croatian Šubić noble family, who ruled from Klis Fortress. He was in possession of Klis, Omiš and Skradin.[1]

Family Connections[edit]

Mladen III Šubić was (probably oldest) son of Juraj II Šubić and grandson of Pavao I Šubić Bribirski, who was the most powerful Croatian noble at the end of the 13th century and beginning of the 14th century.

Mladen III Šubić had two children.

Ruler[edit]

Mladen III ruled from Klis Fortress from 1330–1348, and was named ("shield of the Croats") by the people. He was the famous Šubić from Klis, where he married his sister Jelena Šubić (died c. 1378) to Regent of Bosnia Vladislav Kotromanić. Jelena Šubić gave birth to the first Bosnian King Tvrtko I. However, Mladen III Šubić regardless of the diplomatic success could not save Šubić family from fall, because he was almost only one left to defend it. Before the death he married Serbian Jelena, half-sister of the Serbian ruler Dušan, but even this relationship couldn't help Šubić's family.

Dux Mladen III Šubić died in 1348, from the plague, and is buried in the Cathedral of St. Lawrence in Trogir.

The Aftermath[edit]

Mladen III Šubić ruled from Klis Fortress.

After Mladen III Šubić Bribirski death, arise great political and military struggle for control over Klis Fortress.

After several diplomatic games and battles between the armies, Klis became again the city of Croatian-Hungarian king Louis I of Hungary (Ludovik I. Anžuvinac).

Titles[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fine, John Van Antwerp (1994). The Late Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest. Michigan: The University of Michigan Press. p. 340. ISBN 0-472-08260-4.