Mnong language

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Mnong
Native to Vietnam, Cambodia and United States
Region throughout Tây Nguyên region, especially in Đắk Lắk, Lâm Đồng, Đắk Nông and Bình Phước provinces; Mondulkiri in Cambodia
Native speakers
130,000  (2002–2008)[1]
Austroasiatic
  • Bahnaric
    • South Bahnaric
      • Sre–Mnong
        • Mnong
Language codes
ISO 639-3 Variously:
cmo – Central Mnong
mng – Eastern Mnong
mnn – Southern Mnong
rka – Kraol

The Mnong language belongs to the Mon–Khmer language family. It is spoken by the different groups of Mnong in Vietnam and a Mnong group in Cambodia.

Distribution[edit]

Mnong is spoken in the districts of Đăk Song, Đăk Mil, Đăk R'Lấp, Krông Nô, Gia Nghĩa, and other nearby locations in Đắk Nông Province (Nguyễn & Trương 2009).

Varieties[edit]

According to Ethnologue, four major dialects exist: Central, Eastern and Southern Mnong (all spoken in Vietnam), and Kraol (spoken in Cambodia). Within a dialect group, members do not understand other dialects. The Mnong language was studied first by the linguist Richard Phillips in the early 1970s.[2][3]

Nguyễn & Trương (2009) cover the following M'Nông dialects.

  • M'Nông Preh
  • Kuênh
  • Mạ
  • M'Nông Nâr (Bu Nâr)
  • M'Nông Noong (Bu Noong)
  • M'Nông R'Lâm
  • M'Nông Prâng

References[edit]

  1. ^ Central Mnong at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Eastern Mnong at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Southern Mnong at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
    Kraol at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  2. ^ Harry Leonard Shorto, Jeremy Hugh Chauncy, Shane Davidson (1991). Austroasiatic Languages. Routledge. ISBN 0-7286-0183-4. 
  3. ^ "Language Family Trees". ethnologue.com. Retrieved 2008-01-07. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Blood, Henry Florentine. A Reconstruction of Proto-Mnong. Waxhaw, N.C.: Wycliffe-JAARS Print Shop, 1968.
  • Nguyễn Kiên Trường & Trương Anh. 2009. Từ Điển Việt - M'Nông. Hà Nội: Nhà Xuất Bản Từ Điển Bách Khoa.

External links[edit]