Modus Operandi (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Modus Operandi
MODUSPOSTER.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Frankie Latina
Produced by Sasha Grey
Bobby Ciraldo
Danny Trejo
Janet K. Beasley
Written by Frankie Latina
Andrew Swant
Starring Randy Russell
Danny Trejo
Mark Borchardt
Michael Sottile
Mark Metcalf
Ayesha Mohan
Samwell
Barry Poltermann
Andrew Swant
Bobby Ciraldo
Sarah Price
Music by Peter Batchelder
Ray Chi
Didier Leplae
Nick Pipitone
Renato Umali
Joe Wong
Cinematography Mark Escribano
Production
  company
Frankie Latina Motion Pictures
Special Entertainment
Reign Supreme Entertainment
Distributed by Kino
Release date(s)
  • June 2009 (2009-06) (CineVegas Film Festival)
Running time 80 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Modus Operandi, directed by Frankie Latina, is an independent feature film shot in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Tokyo, Japan. Latina examines the Exploitation film genre through a revenge tale about a desperate C.I.A. agent on a mission to find the man who murdered his wife.

The film stars Danny Trejo (Machete, Heat, Predators), Mark Borchardt (American Movie), Michael Sottile (Reservoir Dogs), and Randy Russell (American Job) as Agent Stanley Cashay.

The film premiered at the CineVegas Film Festival in June 2009, where it received critical acclaim and obtained sales representation from Submarine Entertainment.[1][2] Modus Operandi was an official entry in the American Film Institute Film Festival where it screened at the historic Mann's Chinese Theater in Los Angeles in October 2009. The film played to sold-out audiences at the historic Landmark Oriental Theater during the Milwaukee Film Festival.

The film started its theatrical run on September 10, 2010 at the IFC Center in New York, with a pre-screening introduction from Sasha Grey and appearances by Danny Trejo and Mark Borchardt.

Modus Operandi was produced by Frankie Latina Motion Pictures, Special Entertainment, and Reign Supreme Entertainment and was distributed on DVD, Video On Demand, and Redbox by Kino on February 14, 2012.

Director Latina with Danny Trejo

Plot synopsis[edit]

Two briefcases with mysterious contents are stolen from top Presidential candidate Squire Parks, setting off a deadly series of double-crosses and betrayals. Desperate warring factions of subterranean organizations will stop at nothing to gain possession of the sensitive material. A covert branch of the CIA calls on notorious Black Ops agent Stanley Cashay, who has been barely existing in a semi-comatose twilight since the murder of his wife. Cashay is offered the identity of his wife’s killer in exchange for locating and returning the cases.

Agent Cashay uses the most dangerous weapons at his command, the telephone and his reputation, to unleash a bizarre assortment of operatives, including the deliciously sleazy Casey Thunderbird and exotic Tokyo-based special agent Black Licorice. Along with scores of other beguiling rogues, they initiate a horrifying chain of events, including ruthless torture and brutal killings. When Cashay is finally in possession of the stolen materials, the contents of the briefcases shock even him, and he makes a decision that will change the course of history. Cashay then sets the wheels in motion for bitter revenge and harsh justice, but not before the entire operation is nearly derailed as merciless underworld forces fight back. The final chapters play out as an increasingly surreal vision of modern reality, skirting the edge of sanity and culminating with the wrath of the powerful Director Holiday, a man who would put the fear of God into God Himself.

Critical reception[edit]

The film received generally positive reviews. As of January 14, 2011, the film holds an 75% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a rating of 6.6 out of 10 on IMDb. Critic Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun Times gave the film a positive review and called it a "special pleasure". Mike Hale of the New York Times said "Frankie Latina’s Modus Operandi bears a greater surface resemblance to the 1960s and ’70s genre films to which it pays homage than Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez’s Grindhouse did." Eric Hynes of the Village Voice called the film "seriously seedy and truly inspired", and Kyle Smith of the New York Post referred to the film as "Genius-level garbage".

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hollywood Reporter article "Biz places bets on fresh talent at Vegas film fest"". Reuters. 2009-06-15. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  2. ^ "Fangoria article "Examining Latina's Modus Operandi"". Retrieved 2010-01-08. 

External links[edit]