Mohamad Al-Khaled Samha

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Mohamad Al-Khaled (born 1965) is a Danish imam.[1]

Al-Khaled started an Islamic information and advice center in Vollsmose, Odense.[1]

Al-Khaled worked together with Christian priests to put up a display on religions in the municipality building.[1] He also participated in a conference between Christian and Muslim leaders in Denmark[2]

Al-Khaled worked as prison imam at state prison in Nyborg until he was fired in July 2006. According to sources at the prison it was because of his tour in the Middle East.[3] Answering to the story in the Folketing, Justice minister Lene Espersen said he was fired due to cutbacks at the prison.[4]

Al-Khaled was one of the imams who traveled to the Middle East with the Akkari-Laban dossier during the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. He was part of the first delegation of imams which went to Egypt December 3–December 11, 2005.

Al-Khaled knew the Vollsmose terrorists, who lived in his area, though he mentioned in interviews he knew them only as neighbors[5][6] After their arrest, he confirmed for news reporters that the suspects were Muslims.

Al-Khaled was accused by the Danish newspaper Ekstrabladet, that Youssef Mohamad El Hajdib, one of the suspects arrested in the 2006 German train bombing, had Al-Khaled's phone number saved on his phone.[7] That information gained in importance, when it emerged, that El Hadib was arrested on his way by train to Odense, the city al-Khaled lives in. Al-Khaled denied knowing El Hajdib, and was never charged or asked about this matter by the Danish or the German police, and it was never confirmed that El Hajdib had his number.

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