Mohammad-Reza Ali-Zamani

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Muhammed-Reza Ali-Zamani (ca. 1972 – 28 January 2010) was an Iranian activist working for the "Iran Monarchy Committee"[1] or Kingdom Assembly of Iran, who was sentenced to death by an Islamic Revolutionary Court, in October 2009 for moharebeh — "taking up arms against Iran's Islamic system," — and executed on 28 January 2010.

According to his indictment, Ali-Zamani joined the Kingdom Assembly of Iran "after hearing about it on a television satellite channel" and is accused of "distributing anti-regime CDs and propaganda" and "copies of the Satanic Verses," being trained in chemical weapons and providing information on Iranian officials "targeted for assassination."[1] According to Dordaneh Fouladvand — an Assembly spokeswoman—he had worked with the organisation but had played no role in the post-election protests.[1] According to the same source: "His job was simply to pass on news for our radio station and to make broadcast packages".[1] In January 2010, his execution was carried out.[2]

His was the first case following the mass protests following the 2009 election to result in a death sentence,[3] and "Human rights campaigners" fear it may "pave the way for further politically driven executions" in Iran.[1]

Mark Fitzpatrick, from the International Institute for Strategic Studies, suggested that Mr. Ali-Zamani's harsh sentence was an effort on the part of the Iranian government to discourage future protests: “It sounds like the regime continues to feel very vulnerable and is utilizing all the powers of control at its disposal to stamp out protests,” Mr. Fitzpatrick said.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Iran activist sentenced to death for election protests", Robert Tait, The Guardian (8 October 2009).
  2. ^ "Iran 'executes two over post-election unrest'", BBC News (28 January 2010).
  3. ^ a b "Iranian Site Reports a Death Sentence for Protester", Michael Slackman, The New York Times (8 October 2009).