Mohammed Ben Brahim

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This article is about the poet. For the Moroccan footballer, see Mohamed Ben Brahim.

El Houari Mohammed Ben Brahim Assarraj (1897–1955) was a poet from Morocco. He is especially well known as the poet of Marrakech of the first part of the 20th century. He wrote poems for both king Mohammed V and for his opponent El Glaoui.[1]

According to his biographer Omar Mounir he was "considered a nationalist by the French, a traitor by the nationalists, a alem by the man in the street and a rascal by the ulemas."[2] Mohamed Ben Brahim studied at the Ibn Yousouf University in Marrakech and the Al-Qarawiyyin University of Fes. He worked as a university professor for a short period and, after that as a journalist.

Many of Ben Brahim's poems are put to music and still popular in present-day Morocco. Karima Skalli is one of his work's interpreters.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Omar Mounir, Le Poète de Marrakech (=Shair Al-Hamra), Editions La Porte, Rabat, 2001. ISBN 9981-889-26-1
  • Ben Brahim, Mohammed (1949). “Ilayka Ya Ni Ma Sadiq”(To you my dear friend). Tetuan, Morocco: Hassania Publishing Company
  • Ahmed Cherkaoui-Ikbal, Le poète de Marrakech sous les tamis (1958)
  • Abdelkrim Ghallab, L'Univers du Poète de Marrakech (1982)
  • Ahmed al Khoulassa, Le Poète de Marrakech dans l'histoire de la littérature contemporaine (1987)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Écrivains marocains du Protectorat à 1965, p. 27-29 "Mohammed Ibn Ibrahim"
  2. ^ Omar Mounir, Le Poète de Marrakech : "Individu inclassable, inconstant en qui les nationalistes voyaient un traître et les Français un nationaliste, l’homme de la rue le voyait âlim, les oulamas le voyaient voyou".

External links[edit]

  • Said Hajji.com: fragments from the journal Al Maghrib no. 396 (1940) [1] (translated in English)
  • Bouchra Lahbabi, "Maoussimyyat : hommage à Ben Brahim, poète de Marrakech", Le Matin, 28 - 10 - 2001 [2] (retrieved 15-7-2012)
  • maroc-hebdo.press: Un poète chez les hommes (second article) [3] (in French)