Monash University, Clayton campus

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Robert Menzies Building at the Clayton Campus
The Lake near the Halls of Residence
The Chancellory (building 3a)

Monash University, Clayton campus is the main campus of Monash University located in Clayton, which is a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, in the state of Victoria.

The campus covers an area of over 1.1 km² and is the largest of the Monash University campuses, both in terms of size and student population. Clayton Campus currently has over 25, 000 students.[1]

The campus has its own suburb and is one of the few university campuses in Australia to have its own postcode (3800),[2] and shares the telephone number extension of 990 with the other city campuses of the university. The Campus features a wide range of native Australian flora and fauna, including over 2000 different kinds of plant life.[3]

Location[edit]

The campus is located in the south-east Melbourne suburb of Clayton. This part of Melbourne contains the greatest density of high technology industries in Victoria.[4] As well as the Australian Synchrotron, the Clayton Campus is adjacent to the CSIRO. Bosch, Bayer, Varian, Inc. and several other science and technology companies are also located nearby. Victoria's only specialist science and mathematics high school, the John Monash Science School, is also located on the Campus.[5]

Facilities[edit]

Research[edit]

The Clayton Campus is home to some of the largest and most sophisticated research facilities in the world. The Australian Synchrotron, adjoining the campus, is one of the most recent and sophisticated of these. It is a 3 GeV synchrotron radiation facility that opened on 31 July 2007.[6][7] It is capable of viewing matter at the molecular level using synchrotron light. Monash University contributed $5M towards the $206M cost of the synchrotron as a member of the funding partnership for the initial suite of beamlines.

The campus is also home to the Monash University Accident Research Centre, which includes an advanced driving simulator capable of simulating motor vehicle accidents. The campus also houses some of the world's largest regenerative medicine stem cell research facilities, including the Australian Stem Cell Centre, the Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, the Monash Medical Research Institute and the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute.

The Monash Antibody Technology Facility is also based at the Clayton Campus, which contains the largest monoclonal antibody production facility in the Southern Hemisphere.[8] The largest wind tunnel in the Southern Hemisphere is another facility based on campus.

Many of these facilities are located in the Monash Science Technology Research and Innovation Precinct (STRIP), a major development which houses corporate and university science and technology enterprises.[9]

Sport[edit]

The Clayton Campus has the most extensive sporting facilities of any Monash campus. These are used by the campus' many sporting clubs, as well as recreationally by staff and students.

Facilities at the campus include: three football and cricket ovals (including a pavilion), two soccer fields, 12 tennis courts, eight squash courts, a hockey field and pavilion, an American football field, a baseball field and pavilion, 21 badminton and table tennis courts, a martial arts hall, a fencing cage, a boxing studio and ring, a 1500m sq. gym, an aerobics studio and two swimming pools.[10]

Culture[edit]

Clayton Campus plays host to a range of cultural events throughout the year, including plays, musicals, concerts, exhibitions and conferences.

Notable facilities include the Robert Blackwood Hall (with a capacity of 1600 people), the Alexander Theatre (capacity of 508),[11] the Student Theatre and the Monash University Museum of Art.[12]

The campus has three major academic libraries: the Louis Matheson Library (for arts and commerce), the Hargrave-Andrew Library (for engineering, science and technology) and the Law Library. It is also home to numerous smaller academic libraries, as well as the recreational John Medley Library.

Social life[edit]

The campus is home to numerous restaurants, cafés and retail outlets, largely located in the Campus Centre.[13]

The Notting Hill Hotel, known among students as The Nott, is a large pub located adjacent to the campus and forms a major part of the social life for students on campus.[14] It contains three bars, two beer gardens and two bistros.[15] Now something of an institution, the Nott was founded in 1891 as a half way house for travellers, but boomed from the early 1960s after the establishment of Monash, expanding to cover an area of 0.8 hectares.[16] It was owned and run by Australia's longest-serving publican, Kath Byer (known as the Reverend Mother by students) from 1936 until her death in 2010.[15]

Monash Clayton also runs Host Scheme, the largest student-based orientation program in the Southern hemisphere.[17] It has been in existence since 1974, and includes orientation camps, tours, BBQs, functions, festivals, and massive party called Host Scheme Night, which is run on the Monday night of O-week every year.[17]

The Clayton Campus is also a short trip from Chadstone Shopping Centre, the largest shopping mall in the Southern Hemisphere.[18]

Residential services[edit]

Howitt Hall at the Clayton campus in Victoria Australia, site of the recently constructed Briggs and Jackomos Halls

There are eight residential halls on campus, Howitt Hall , Deakin Hall, Farrer Hall, Richardson Hall, Roberts Hall, Normanby House, Briggs Hall and Jackomos Hall. These halls are home to over 1600 students and staff. As of 2014 construction has begun on several new residential halls in line with the Campus Masterplan. [19]

The Clayton Campus is also affiliated with Mannix College (adjacent to the university). [20]

Faculties at the Clayton campus[edit]

Although many faculties have a presence on multiple campuses, the majority are based at Clayton. The following faculties are based at Clayton Campus:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]