Monique Taylor

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Monique Taylor
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario
Incumbent
Assumed office
2011
Preceded by Sophia Aggelonitis
Constituency Hamilton Mountain
Personal details
Born 1972 (age 41–42)
Hamilton, Ontario
Political party New Democrat
Children 1

Monique Taylor (born ca. 1972) is a Canadian politician, who was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in the 2011 election.[1]

Background[edit]

Taylor was born in east end of Hamilton and grew up in the city. She has worked as a waitress and most recently as administrative assistant to Hamilton City Councillor Scott Duvall.[2] She lives with her partner Mike and her daughter.[3]

Politics[edit]

In 2011 she ran as the New Democrat candidate in the riding of Hamilton Mountain. She beat incumbent Sophia Aggelonitis by 5,798 votes. As of 2011 she serves as the critic for children and youth services.

In 2012 she introduced a private member's bill that would have extended Ontario ombudsman's oversight to Children Aid Societies. The bill made it to second reading but the bill died when Premier Dalton McGuinty prorogued the house in September 2012.[4]

Electoral record[edit]

Ontario general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Monique Taylor 20,492 45.2 +11.68
Liberal Sophia Aggelonitis 14,694 32.4 -4.83
Progressive Conservative Geordie Elms 8,641 19.0 -4.54
Green Tony Morris 748 1.6 -3.05
Family Coalition Jim Enos 450 1.0 -0.06
Libertarian Hans Wienhold 222 0.5
Freedom Brian Goodwin 126 0.3
Total valid votes 45,373 100.00
Source: Elections Ontario.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Taylor in sensational upset". Hamilton Spectator. 6 October 2011. 
  2. ^ "Who is Monique Taylor?". Hamilton Spectator. 8 October 2011. 
  3. ^ Dreschel, Andrew (24 October 2011). "From dropout to Hamilton's new MPP: An optimistic politician who believes she can make change". The Spectator. p. A15. 
  4. ^ Walters, Joan (18 October 2012). "Hamilton MPPs watch, frustrated, as bills die after premier prorogues session". Hamilton Spectator. 
  5. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for each Candidate: 2011" (PDF). Elections Ontario. p. 7. Retrieved 2012-10-13. 

External links[edit]