Mono Hot Springs, California

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Mono Hot Springs
Unincorporated community
Mono Hot Springs is located in California
Mono Hot Springs
Mono Hot Springs
Location in California
Coordinates: 37°19′36″N 119°01′03″W / 37.32667°N 119.01750°W / 37.32667; -119.01750Coordinates: 37°19′36″N 119°01′03″W / 37.32667°N 119.01750°W / 37.32667; -119.01750
Country United States
State California
County Fresno County
Elevation[1] 6,562 (6,700) ft (2,000 m)

Mono Hot Springs (formerly Lower Hot Springs and Lower Mineral Hot Springs)[2] is a summer resort, campground, unincorporated community, and a group of hot springs in Fresno County, central California.[1] It is located within the Sierra National Forest, 70 miles (110 km) northeast of Fresno via California State Route 168.[3]

History[edit]

The Mono Hot Springs post office was established in 1945.[2] It, a general store, and stone cabins are located at the rustic Mono Hot Springs Resort.[4] Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the resort was built in 1935, a few years after Southern California Edison completed this section of the Kaiser Pass Road for the Big Creek Hydroelectric Project.[5]

Geography[edit]

Mono Hot Springs lies at an elevation of 6,700 feet (2,000 m), in the central Sierra Nevada.[1][3] There are six separate hot springs, with the hottest 112 °F (44.4 °C).[2] The public springs are on the hillside across the South Fork of the San Joaquin River from the campground and resort.

The locale is between Florence Lake and Lake Thomas A Edison reservoirs of the Big Creek Hydroelectric Project. It is reached via the forest service's Kaiser Pass Road, 17 miles (27 km) northeast from its start at Huntington Lake.[3] The road crosses the 9,175 feet (2,797 m) Kaiser Pass before reaching the hot springs and reservoirs.

Recreation[edit]

The Sierra National Forest's Mono Hot Springs Campground is located adjacent to the springs and resort, on the river.[6] The Mono Creek Campground, is in the vicinity to the north, on a meadow along Mono Creek.[7] Ward Lake and Jackass Meadow Campgrounds in the area.[8][9]

Mono Hot Springs is a trailhead for hiking trails to local mountains, a volcanic plug, lakes, and to reach the Ansel Adams Wilderness area on the north and John Muir Wilderness area on the east.[10]

Natural history[edit]

Large rounded rock formations of Sierra granite predominate the terrain, rising above the vegetation and river.

Flora[edit]

The Mono Hot Springs Evening-primrose, Camissonia sierrae subsp. alticola, is endemic and limited to this area and several sites in Yosemite National Park.[11] It is listed on the California Native Plant Society Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants.[12]

Predominant trees in the surrounding forest include Sierra lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta) and Ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]