Monroe County, New York

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Not to be confused with Monroe, New York. ‹See Tfd›
Monroe County, New York
MonroeCountyOfficeBuilding.JPG
Monroe County Office Building
Seal of Monroe County, New York
Seal
Map of New York highlighting Monroe County
Location in the state of New York
Map of the United States highlighting New York
New York's location in the U.S.
Founded February 23, 1821
Named for James Monroe
Seat Rochester
Largest city Rochester
Area
 • Total 1,366 sq mi (3,538 km2)
 • Land 659 sq mi (1,707 km2)
 • Water 706 sq mi (1,829 km2), 51.72%
Population (Est.)
 • (2012) 749,606
 • Density 1,129/sq mi (436/km²)
Congressional districts 25th, 27th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.monroecounty.gov

Monroe County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of 2013, the population was 749,606.[1] Its county seat is the city of Rochester.[2] The county is named after James Monroe, fifth President of the United States of America.

Monroe County is part of the Rochester, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area. Monroe County is located in Western New York.

History[edit]

When counties were established in the Province of New York in 1683, the present Monroe County was part of Albany County. This was an enormous county, including the northern part of New York State as well as all of the present State of Vermont and, in theory, extending westward to the Pacific Ocean. This county was reduced in size on July 3, 1766 by the creation of Cumberland County, and further on March 16, 1770 by the creation of Gloucester County, both containing territory now in Vermont.

On March 12, 1772, what was left of Albany County was split into three parts, one remaining under the name Albany County. One of the other pieces, Tryon County, contained the western portion (and thus, since no western boundary was specified, theoretically still extended west to the Pacific). The eastern boundary of Tryon County was approximately five miles west of the present city of Schenectady, and the county included the western part of the Adirondack Mountains and the area west of the West Branch of the Delaware River. The area then designated as Tryon County now includes 37 counties of New York State. The county was named for William Tryon, colonial governor of New York.

In the years prior to 1776, most of the Loyalists in Tryon County fled to Canada. In 1784, following the peace treaty that ended the American Revolutionary War, the name of Tryon County was changed to Montgomery County in order to honor the general, Richard Montgomery, who had captured several places in Canada and died attempting to capture the city of Quebec, replacing the name of the hated British governor.

In 1789, Ontario County was split off from Montgomery. The actual area split off from Montgomery County was much larger than the present county, also including the present Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Orleans, Steuben, Wyoming, Yates, and part of Schuyler and Wayne counties.

Genesee County was created by a splitting of Ontario County in 1802. This was much larger than the present Genesee County, however. It contained the present Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Niagara, Orleans, Wyoming, and portions of Livingston and Monroe counties.

Finally, Monroe County was formed from parts of Genesee and Ontario counties in 1821.

Notable residents[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,366 square miles (3,540 km2), of which 659 square miles (1,710 km2) is land and 706 square miles (1,830 km2) (51.72%) is water.[3]

Monroe County is in the northern tier of western New York State, northeast of Buffalo and northwest of Syracuse. The northern county line is also the state line and the border of the United States, marked by Lake Ontario. Monroe County is north of the Finger Lakes.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Government and politics[edit]

Monroe County was chartered as a municipal corporation by the New York State Legislature in 1892[4] and re-chartered under New York's Municipal Home Rule Law in 1965.[5]

Executive branch[edit]

The county's executive branch is headed by the County Executive, Maggie Brooks.[6] The executive's office is located on the first floor of the County Office Building on West Main Street in Rochester.

The county was exclusively governed by a Board of Supervisors for the first 114 years of its history. In 1935, the position of County Manager, appointed by the Board, was approved by popular referendum.[7] In 1983, the position was replaced by a County Executive, directly elected by popular vote, with expanded powers (e.g., veto).[8] In 1993, the legislature enacted term limits for the executive office of 12 consecutive years to start in 1996.[9]

Legislative branch[edit]

The county's legislative branch consists of a 29-member County Legislature which replaced the earlier 43-member Board of Supervisors on January 1, 1967.[10] It meets in the Legislative Chambers on the fourth floor of the County Office Building. All 29 members of the legislature are elected from districts. District Maps Currently, there are 19 Republicans and 10 Democrats. In 1993, the legislature enacted term limits of 10 consecutive years to start in 1996.[11]

Judicial branch[edit]

  • Monroe County Court
  • Monroe County Family Court, for matters involving children
  • Monroe County Surrogates Court, for matters involving the deceased
  • Rochester City Court

Representation at the federal level[edit]

After redistricting based on the 2010 United States Census, Monroe County was split between two congressional districts:

District Areas of Monroe County Congressperson Party First took office Residence
New York's 25th congressional district All of Monroe County except those portions represented by the 27th district[12] Louise M. Slaughter Democratic 1987 Fairport, Monroe County
New York's 27th congressional district Hamlin, Mendon, Rush, Wheatland, and the southwest corner of Clarkson[13] Christopher C. Collins Republican 2013 Clarence, Erie County

Representation at the state level[edit]

New York State Senate[edit]

After redistricting based on the 2010 United States Census, Monroe County was split between six state senate districts:

District Areas of Monroe County Senator Party First took office Residence
54 Webster[14] Michael F. Nozzolio Republican 1993 Fayette, Seneca County
55 East Rochester, Irondequoit, Mendon, Penfield, Perinton, Pittsford, Rush, northeastern part of the City of Rochester[15] Edward M. "Ted" O'Brien Democratic 2013 Irondequoit, Monroe County
56 Brighton, Clarkson, Gates, Greece, Hamlin, Parma, northwestern part of the City of Rochester[16] Joseph E. Robach Republican 2003 Greece, Monroe County
59 Henrietta, Wheatland[17] Patrick M. Gallivan Republican 2011 Elma, Erie County
61 Chili, Riga, southern part of the City of Rochester[18] Michael H. Ranzenhofer Republican 2009 Amherst, Erie County
62 Ogden, Sweden[19] George D. Maziarz Republican 1995 Newfane, Niagara County

New York State Assembly[edit]

After redistricting based on the 2010 United States Census, Monroe County was split between seven state assembly districts:

District Areas of Monroe County Assemblyperson Party First took office Residence
133 Mendon, Pittsford, Riga, Rush, Wheatland[20] William R. Nojay Republican 2013 Pittsford, Monroe County
134 Greece, Ogden, Parma[21] William D. Reilich Republican 2003 Greece, Monroe County
135 East Rochester, Penfield, Perinton, Webster[22] Mark C. Johns Republican 2011 Webster, Monroe County
136 Brighton, Irondequoit, northwest portion and easternmost tip of the City of Rochester[23] Joseph D. Morelle Democratic 1991 Irondequoit, Monroe County
137 Gates, center of the City of Rochester[24] David F. Gantt Democratic 1983 Rochester, Monroe County
138 Chili, Henrietta, parts of the City of Rochester[25] Harry B. Bronson Democratic 2011 Rochester, Monroe County
139 Clarkson, Hamlin, Sweden[26] Stephen M. Hawley Republican 2006 Batavia, Genesee County

Courts[edit]

Monroe County is part of

Economy[edit]

Monroe County is a home to a number of international businesses, including Eastman Kodak,[27] Bausch & Lomb,[28] Paychex,[29] and Pictometry International,[30] all of which make Monroe County world headquarters. Xerox, while no longer headquartered in Rochester, has its principal offices and manufacturing facilities in Monroe County.[citation needed]

Because of the prevalence of imaging and optical science among the industry and the universities, Rochester is known as the world capital of imaging. The University of Rochester's Institute of Optics doctoral program was ranked in 2004 as number one in the country by the National Research Council in number of publications published per faculty member.[31]

Monroe County is also home to regional businesses such as Wegmans,[32] Roberts Communications, Inc.,[33] PAETEC Holding Corp.,[34] and major fashion label Hickey Freeman.[35]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 49,855
1840 64,902 30.2%
1850 87,650 35.0%
1860 100,648 14.8%
1870 117,868 17.1%
1880 144,903 22.9%
1890 189,586 30.8%
1900 217,854 14.9%
1910 283,212 30.0%
1920 352,034 24.3%
1930 423,881 20.4%
1940 438,230 3.4%
1950 487,632 11.3%
1960 586,387 20.3%
1970 711,917 21.4%
1980 702,238 −1.4%
1990 713,968 1.7%
2000 735,343 3.0%
2010 744,344 1.2%
Est. 2013 749,606 0.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[36]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census of 2000, there were 735,343 people, 286,512 households, and 184,513 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,115 people per square mile (431/km²). There were 304,388 housing units at an average density of 462 per square mile (178/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.14% White, 13.75% African American, 0.27% Native American, 2.44% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.44% from other races, and 1.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.31% of the population. 18.6% were of Italian, 15.3% German, 11.3% Irish and 8.3% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 4.64% of the population reported speaking Spanish at home, while 1.43% speak Italian.[37]

There were 286,512 households out of which 31.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.40% were married couples living together, 13.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.60% were non-families. 28.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.60% under the age of 18, 9.50% from 18 to 24, 29.30% from 25 to 44, 22.60% from 45 to 64, and 13.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $44,891, and the median income for a family was $55,900. Males had a median income of $41,279 versus $29,553 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,821. About 8.20% of families and 11.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.50% of those under age 18 and 7.40% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

The town, village, and city borders

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary education[edit]

The overwhelming majority of children in Monroe County are educated by the public school system. The schools operated by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Rochester or Roman Catholic religious orders educate the next largest segment of children, although collectively, these are a distant second.

Public schools[edit]

There are some 26 public school districts that serve Monroe County, including the Rochester City School District, 10 suburban school districts in Monroe #1 BOCES, seven in Monroe #2–Orleans BOCES, and several primarily serving other counties (Avon, Byron–Bergen, Caledonia–Mumford, Holley, Wayne, Williamson and Victor central school districts).[38]

Public school districts in 2012[39]
Name BOCES Established District population Professional staff Support staff Median teacher salary Median experience (years) Enrollment Budget Per pupil cost
Brighton Central School District Monroe #1 26450 356 278 $60274 11 3631 $63.6 million $17505
Brockport Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 30000 362 368 $52390 11 4059 $69.6 million $17155
Churchville-Chili Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 1950 30000 352 319 $54263 10 4042 $70.4 million $17422
East Irondequoit Central School District Monroe #1 1956 27000 340 324 $53721 7.1 3331 $69.6 million $20896
East Rochester Union Free School District Monroe #1 1920 8200 122 98 $47473 12 1268 $25.2 million $19886
Fairport Central School District Monroe #1 1951 40000 596 539 $58540 12 6510 $106.1 million $15967
Gates Chili Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 1956 35000 418 362 $61743 15 4471 $88.3 million $19753
Greece Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 1928 96000 1149 1347 $64000 11.1 11923 $197.6 million $16572
Hilton Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 25000 409 362 $55375 10 4488 $69.3 million $15432
Honeoye Falls-Lima Central School District Monroe #1 1969 10225 212 218 $58250 16 2513 $41.4 million $16472
Kendall Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 3500 84 78 $50949 11 845 $16.5 million $19486
Penfield Central School District Monroe #1 1948 35000 424 475 $58813 11.8 4558 $83.2 million $18247
Pittsford Central School District Monroe #1 1946 33000 810 384 $59505 10 5976 $111.6 million $18673
Rochester City School District None 1841 210000 3658 1883 $56592 10 30976 $564.5 million $18225
Rush-Henrietta Central School District Monroe #1 1947 46000 585 543 $55567 9 5568 $101.7 million $18257
Spencerport Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 22334 398 356 $53565 14 3783 $68.7 million $18163
Webster Central School District Monroe #1 1948 52300 785 553 $59658 11 8806 $140.6 million $15964
West Irondequoit Central School District Monroe #1 1953 23754 326 340 $55890 9 3674 $66.7 million $18144
Wheatland–Chili Central School District Monroe #2–Orleans 1955 6000 86 83 $57223 10 720 $16.5 million $22916

Private schools[edit]

There are three private schools that serve more than 200 students each:

There is one small, but historically significant school: Rochester School for the Deaf in the city

Parochial schools[edit]

  • There are three small Judaic schools and two small Islamic schools.
  • There are about ten primary schools operated by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Rochester.
  • There are four senior high schools (or combined junior/senior high schools) operated by or in the tradition of a Roman Catholic religious order:
School Founding religious order Location Established Grades
McQuaid Jesuit High School Jesuits Brighton 1954 6–12
Our Lady of Mercy High School Sisters of Mercy Brighton 1928 6–12
Aquinas Institute Basilian City of Rochester 1902 6–12
Bishop Kearney High School Christian Brothers, Sisters of Notre Dame Irondequoit 1962 7–12
  • There are more than two dozen schools operated by various sects of Christianity, three of which serve more than 200 students:
School Religious affiliation Location Established Grades
The Charles Finney School Non-denominational Christian Penfield 1992 K–12
Northstar Christian Academy Baptist Gates 1972 K–12
Webster Christian School Non-denominational Christian Webster 1977 K–12

Colleges and universities[edit]

For colleges and universities in the Greater Rochester Area, see Rochester, New York metropolitan area#Colleges and universities.

The county is home to nine colleges and universities:

Additionally, four colleges maintain satellite campuses in Monroe County:

Parks[edit]

Wetlands Trail in Black Creek Park

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 12, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ "Governing Monroe County: A Staff Report to the Charter Study Commission". Rochester, New York: The Center for Governmental Research. 1974. p. 15. OCLC 21663493. 
  5. ^ "Governing Monroe County: A Staff Report to the Charter Study Commission". Rochester, New York: The Center for Governmental Research. 1974. p. 25. OCLC 21663493. 
  6. ^ "Monroe County Executive website". Retrieved 2008-06-22. 
  7. ^ Monroe County Guide to Local Government. Rochester, New York: Monroe County League of Women Voters. 1986. p. 10. OCLC 13907929. 
  8. ^ Monroe County Guide to Local Government. Rochester, New York: Monroe County League of Women Voters. 1986. p. 11. OCLC 13907929. 
  9. ^ "Monroe limits legislator terms". Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, New York). 1993-11-03. p. 1A. ISSN 1088-5153 
  10. ^ Monroe County Guide to Local Government. Rochester, New York: Monroe County League of Women Voters. 1986. p. 10. OCLC 13907929. 
  11. ^ "Monroe limits legislator terms". Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, New York). 1993-11-03. p. 1A. ISSN 1088-5153 
  12. ^ W, Eric (2012-04-02). "Congressional District 25". View 2012 Congressional Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  13. ^ W, Eric (2012-04-02). "Congressional District 27". View 2012 Congressional Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  14. ^ W, Eric (2012-03-02). "Senate District 54". View 2012 Senate District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  15. ^ W, Eric (2012-03-02). "Senate District 55". View 2012 Senate District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  16. ^ W, Eric (2012-03-02). "Senate District 56". View 2012 Senate District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  17. ^ W, Eric (2012-03-02). "Senate District 59". View 2012 Senate District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  18. ^ W, Eric (2012-03-02). "Senate District 61". View 2012 Senate District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  19. ^ W, Eric (2012-03-02). "Senate District 62". View 2012 Senate District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  20. ^ W, Eric (2012-01-25). "Assembly District 133". View Proposed 2012 Assembly District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  21. ^ W, Eric (2012-01-25). "Assembly District 134". View Proposed 2012 Assembly District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  22. ^ W, Eric (2012-01-25). "Assembly District 135". View Proposed 2012 Assembly District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  23. ^ W, Eric (2012-01-25). "Assembly District 136". View Proposed 2012 Assembly District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  24. ^ W, Eric (2012-01-25). "Assembly District 137". View Proposed 2012 Assembly District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  25. ^ W, Eric (2012-01-25). "Assembly District 138". View Proposed 2012 Assembly District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  26. ^ W, Eric (2012-01-25). "Assembly District 139". View Proposed 2012 Assembly District Maps. Albany, New York: The New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  27. ^ "Eastman Kodak Company information and related industry information from Hoover's". Hoover's, Inc. 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-25. 
  28. ^ "Bausch & Lomb information and related industry information from Hoover's". Hoover's, Inc. 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-25. 
  29. ^ "Paychex, Inc. information and related industry information from Hoover's". Hoover's, Inc. 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-25. 
  30. ^ "Business briefs". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=20107070338). 2010-07-07. "Dick Kaplan announced his resignation as CEO of Pictometry International Corp., the Henrietta-based aerial imaging firm that he has built into one of the Rochester area’s better-known companies." 
  31. ^ "University of Rochester Institute of Optics celebrates its 75th anniversary". SPIE—The International Society for Optical Engineering. 2004. Retrieved 2007-04-25. [dead link]
  32. ^ "Wegmans Food Markets, Inc. information and related industry information from Hoover's". Hoover's. 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-25. 
  33. ^ "Roberts Communications, Inc. information and related industry information from Hoover's". Hoover's, Inc. 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-25. 
  34. ^ Daneman, Matthew (2010-08-06). "PAETEC cuts loss to $7.5M". Democrat and Chronicle. Retrieved 2010-08-11. "PAETEC Holding Corp. is edging closer to — but still falling short of — profitability. The Perinton-based telecommunications company reported a loss of $7.5 million for the quarter that ended June 30, an improvement from the $16.5 million it lost in the same quarter a year earlier and from the $9.5 million it lost in the January–March quarter this year." 
  35. ^ "Hickey-Freeman Co., Inc. information and related industry information from Hoover's". Hoover's, Inc. 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  36. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved October 12, 2013. 
  37. ^ "MLA Language Map Data Center: Monroe County, New York". Modern Language Association. 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-25. 
  38. ^ Facts and Figures on Monroe County School Districts, Brighton, New York: Monroe County School Boards Association, 2012, pp. back flap, OCLC 4891330 
  39. ^ Facts and Figures on Monroe County School Districts, Brighton, New York: Monroe County School Boards Association, 2012, pp. 6–43, OCLC 4891330 
  40. ^ "Rochester Regional Office". Ithaca, New York: Cornell University. Retrieved 2011-12-21. 
  41. ^ "Rochester Location". Saratoga, New York: Empire State College. Retrieved 2011-12-21. 
  42. ^ "Rochester Center". Ithaca, New York: Ithaca College. Retrieved 2011-12-21. "Ithaca College maintains a teaching and research facility in Rochester, NY on the campus of the Colgate Rochester Crozier Divinity School (CRCDS on South Goodman St. at Highland Ave.) and has an affiliation with the University of Rochester and Strong Memorial Hospital." 
  43. ^ "Rochester Campus". Buffalo, New York: Medaille College. Retrieved 2011-12-21. "We are located at 1880 South Winton Road, situated near Rochester's Outer Loop" 

Further reading[edit]

  • Sherwood, D.A. (2003). Water resources of Monroe County, New York, water years 1997-99, with emphasis on water quality in the Irondequoit Creek basin : atmospheric deposition, ground water, streamflow, trends in water quality, and chemical loads to Irondequoit Bay [Water-Resources Investigations Report 02-4221]. Ithaca, NY: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey.
  • Raines, Thomas, [et al.] (1895). Landmarks of Monroe County, New York. Boston: The Boston History Company. Retrieved 2013-11-10. 
  • Federal Writers' Project. New York (State) (1937). Rochester and Monroe County. Rochester, NY: Scrantom's. Retrieved 2013-11-11. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°18′N 77°41′W / 43.30°N 77.69°W / 43.30; -77.69