Monroe Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

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For the municipality of the same name in Middlesex County, see Monroe Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey.
Monroe Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Monroe
Monroe Township highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Monroe Township highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Monroe Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Monroe Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°39′37″N 74°58′22″W / 39.660293°N 74.972747°W / 39.660293; -74.972747Coordinates: 39°39′37″N 74°58′22″W / 39.660293°N 74.972747°W / 39.660293; -74.972747[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Gloucester
Incorporated March 3, 1859
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Michael F. Gabbianelli (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Kevin Heydel[4]
 • Clerk Susan McCormick[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 46.926 sq mi (121.539 km2)
 • Land 46.393 sq mi (120.158 km2)
 • Water 0.533 sq mi (1.381 km2)  1.14%
Area rank 36th of 566 in state
2nd of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 36,129
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 36,597
 • Rank 63rd of 566 in state
2nd of 24 in county[12]
 • Density 778.8/sq mi (300.7/km2)
 • Density rank 408th of 566 in state
16th of 24 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08094 - Williamstown[13]
Area code(s) 609 and 856[14]
FIPS code 3401547250[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882137[17][2]
Website www.monroetownshipnj.org

Monroe Township is a township in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 36,129,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 7,162 (+24.7%) from the 28,967 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,264 (+8.5%) from the 26,703 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Monroe Township was originally formed as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1859, from portions of Washington Township, while the area was still part of Camden County. Monroe Township was shifted to Gloucester County on February 28, 1871, along with the majority of Washington Township. In 1950, portions of the township were transferred to Winslow Township in Camden County.[19]

Victory Lakes (with a 2010 Census population of 2,111[20]) and Williamstown (15,567 residents as of 2010[21]) are census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within Monroe Township.[22] Cross Keys is another unincorporated area within the township.

Geography[edit]

Monroe Township is located at 39°39′37″N 74°58′22″W / 39.660293°N 74.972747°W / 39.660293; -74.972747 (39.660293,-74.972747). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 46.926 square miles (121.539 km2), of which, 46.393 square miles (120.158 km2) of it was land and 0.533 square miles (1.381 km2) of it (1.14%) was water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,417
1870 1,663 17.4%
1880 1,858 11.7%
1890 1,945 4.7%
1900 2,402 23.5%
1910 3,015 25.5%
1920 3,292 9.2%
1930 4,064 23.5%
1940 4,310 6.1%
1950 5,531 28.3%
1960 9,396 69.9%
1970 14,071 49.8%
1980 21,639 53.8%
1990 26,703 23.4%
2000 28,967 8.5%
2010 36,129 24.7%
Est. 2012 36,597 [11] 1.3%
Population sources: 1860-1870[23]
1880-2000[24] 1860-1920[25]
1860-1870[26] 1870[27] 1880-1890[28]
1890-1910[29] 1910-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 36,129 people, 12,815 households, and 9,445 families residing in the township. The population density was 778.8 per square mile (300.7 /km2). There were 13,387 housing units at an average density of 288.6 per square mile (111.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 79.41% (28,689) White, 14.01% (5,060) Black or African American, 0.20% (73) Native American, 2.42% (875) Asian, 0.01% (5) Pacific Islander, 1.54% (557) from other races, and 2.41% (870) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.97% (1,795) of the population.[8]

There were 12,815 households, of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.2% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.3% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.28.[8]

In the township, 25.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.9 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $66,761 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,083) and the median family income was $83,929 (+/- $4,293). Males had a median income of $61,505 (+/- $3,058) versus $41,946 (+/- $1,826) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,270 (+/- $1,121). About 6.1% of families and 7.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.3% of those under age 18 and 10.1% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 28,967 people, 10,521 households, and 7,848 families residing in the township. The population density was 622.3 people per square mile (240.3/km²). There were 11,069 housing units at an average density of 237.8 per square mile (91.8/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 84.83% White, 11.15% African American, 0.25% Native American, 1.23% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.99% from other races, and 1.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.71% of the population.[32][33]

There were 10,521 households out of which 34.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.5% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.4% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.18.[32][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.6% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.1 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the township was $50,037, and the median income for a family was $56,810. Males had a median income of $41,062 versus $29,849 for females. The per capita income for the township was $20,488. About 4.0% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.5% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Monroe Township is governed under the Faulkner Act system of municipal government under Mayor-Council (Plan F), enacted by direct petition as of January 1, 1971.[35] Monroe Township is governed by a Mayor and a seven-member Council, consisting of three At Large seats and four seats selected from wards, all of whom serve four-year terms of office. Elections are held every two years on a staggered basis, with the Mayor and the three council at large seats up for vote and two years later the four ward council seats.[6][36]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Monroe Township is Democrat Michael F. Gabbianelli, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Township Council are Walt Bryson (D, 2016; Ward 3), Frank J. Caligiuri (D, 2016; Ward 4), Marvin Dilks (2016; Ward 1), Rich DiLucia (D, 2016; Ward 2), Ron Garbowski (D, 2014; At Large), Bill Sebastian (D, 2014; At Large) and Dan Teefy (D, 2014; At Large).[37][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Monroe Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 4th state legislative district.[9][41][42]

The seat for New Jersey's First Congressional District is currently vacant, having formerly been represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights), who resigned on February 18, 2014.[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[46][47]

The 4th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2014, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; term ends December 31, 2015),[51] Deputy Freeholder Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 2015),[52] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2014),[53] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2016),[54] Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2016),[55] Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2014)[56] and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township; 2014).[57][58][59][60] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk James N. Hogan,[61] Surrogate Helene M. Reed (Monroe Township)[62] and Sheriff Carmel Morina (Greenwich Township).[63][64][59]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 22,377 registered voters in Monroe Township, of which 9,905 (44.3%) were registered as Democrats, 3,408 (15.2%) were registered as Republicans and 9,051 (40.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 13 voters registered to other parties.[65]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 57.4% of the vote here (9,296 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 40.5% (6,555 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (216 votes), among the 16,193 ballots cast by the township's 22,994 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.4%.[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 54.9% of the vote here (7,994 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 43.6% (6,351 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (133 votes), among the 14,566 ballots cast by the township's 20,814 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 70.0.[67]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 47.0% of the vote here (4,304 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 44.0% (4,034 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.2% (659 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (64 votes), among the 9,165 ballots cast by the township's 22,698 registered voters, yielding a 40.4% turnout.[68]

Education[edit]

The Monroe Township Public Schools is a comprehensive district serving the educational needs of resident students from Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Services are also provided for preschool handicapped students as well as other students with special needs. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[69]) are Holly Glen Elementary School[70] (660 students), Oak Knoll Elementary School[71] (505), Radix Elementary School[72] (723) and Whitehall Elementary School[73] (388) for grades K-4; Williamstown Middle School[74] (1,913) for grades 5-8 and Williamstown High School[75] (1,828) for grades 9-12.[76]

Transportation[edit]

The Black Horse Pike is a four-lane, arterial highway which traverses the entire township NW-SE and provides direct access to downtown Philadelphia (30 minutes) and direct access to Atlantic City (35 minutes). U.S. Route 322 is a two-lane arterial highway which traverses the Township east to west and provides access to the New Jersey Turnpike, north and south (30 minutes), with access to the Commodore Barry Bridge and Delaware Memorial Bridge to Interstate 95 (40 minutes). The Atlantic City Expressway is a four-lane, limited access highway which parallels the Black Horse Pike and provides direct access to downtown Atlantic City (30 minutes) and access to the Garden State Parkway, north and south. Route 42 goes through the township, as do County Route 536 and County Route 538.

New Jersey Transit bus service is available between the township and Philadelphia on the 315 and 400 routes, with local service on the 463 route.[77]

Cross Keys Airport is located in the Cross Keys section.[78]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Business Administrator, Township of Monroe. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  5. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Monroe. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 24.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Monroe, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Monroe township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Monroe township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Williamstown, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Williamstown, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 139. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  20. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Victory Lakes CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Williamstown CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  22. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  23. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  24. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Gloucester County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  26. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 279, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed October 22, 2013. "Monroe contained in 1860 a population of 1,417, and in 1870 1,663. Washington contained in 1850. a population of 2,114; in 1860, 1,307; and in 1870, 1,567. These two townships were set off from Camden county and annexed to Gloucester, February 28th, 1871."
  27. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  28. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Monroe township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Monroe township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Monroe township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  35. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  36. ^ Government Structure, accessed November 1, 2006
  37. ^ Mayor Michael Gab­bianelli, Township of Monroe. Accessed October 22, 2013. Council members are listed using tabs on left of page for "Township Council" and then "Council Members".
  38. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Township of Monroe. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  39. ^ Barna, John. "Gloucester County municipal election results", Gloucester County Times, November 3, 2010. Accessed October 22, 2013. "Democrat incumbent Michael Gabbiannelli (4,664) defeated Republican Samuel B. Miles III (4,531) for a four-year term as mayor. Democrat incumbents Daniel Teefy (4,696), William G. Sebastian Jr. (4,655) and Ronald Garbowski (4,611) defeated Republicans Christopher Cugini (4,387), Amy L. Driscoll (4,363) and Ariel Miles (4,315) for four-year, at-large seats. Council will remain 7-0 Democrat with a Democratic mayor."
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ Robert M. Damminger, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  52. ^ Giuseppe (Joe) Chila, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  53. ^ Lyman Barnes, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  54. ^ Daniel Christy, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  55. ^ Frank J. DiMarco, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  56. ^ Heather Simmons, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  57. ^ Adam J. Taliaferro, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  58. ^ Board of Freeholders, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  59. ^ a b 2014 Gloucester County Official Directory, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  60. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  61. ^ James N. Hogan, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  62. ^ Surrogate Helene M. Reed, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  63. ^ Sheriff Carmel M. Morina, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  64. ^ Row Officers, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed September 12, 2014.
  65. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Gloucester, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  67. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  68. ^ 2009 Governor: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  69. ^ Data for the Monroe Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  70. ^ Holly Glen Elementary School, Monroe Township Public Schools. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  71. ^ Oak Knoll Elementary School, Monroe Township Public Schools. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  72. ^ Radix Elementary School, Monroe Township Public Schools. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  73. ^ Whitehall Elementary School, Monroe Township Public Schools. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  74. ^ Williamstown Middle School, Monroe Township Public Schools. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  75. ^ Williamstown High School, Monroe Township Public Schools. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  76. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Monroe Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 22, 2013.
  77. ^ Gloucester County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 6, 2012.
  78. ^ "Pilot survives small plane crash", WPVI, July 16, 2008. Accessed July 28, 2008. "Chopper 6 was over Cross Keys Airport in Monroe Township, Gloucester County."

External links[edit]