Mont di

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Mont di
Rakhinemontdi.JPG
Rakhine mont di salad with garnish
Alternative names Rakhine mont di, Mandalay mont di
Course Breakfast, Lunch
Place of origin Myanmar
Region or state Rakhine State, Mandalay Region
Main ingredients rice vermicelli, Daggertooth pike conger, ngapi, lemongrass, red chili sauce, green chili paste, crisp garlic garnish, coriander
Cookbook:Mont di  Mont di

Mont di (Burmese: မုန့်တီ [mo̰ʊɴ tì]) is a collective term for Burmese cuisine dishes made with thin rice noodles. The vermicelli is used fresh, as it ferments quickly in Myanmar's tropical climate. There are a number of mont di dishes and the Rakhine mont di of the Arakanese from western Myanmar is the most popular. Mandalay mont di is another well known dish.

Variations[edit]

Rakhine mont di[edit]

Rakhine mont di (Burmese: ရခိုင်မုန့်တီ) is the most popular dish in association with the Rakhine people. It is a semi staple dish of the Rakhine State. It comes in two forms: salad or soup.

The soup is the more common version, in which rice vermicelli is mixed with a thin soup made of daggertooth pike conger,called thinbaw htoe (သင်္ဘောထိုး) in Arakanese, nga shwe (ငါးရွှေ) in Burmese[1]), Rakhine ngapi and lemongrass. Dry roasted pike conger eel flakes, fried onion and garlic, fresh coriander, red and green chili paste are added. It is also called arpu sharpu (အာပူရှာပူ) which roughly means 'hot throat, hot tongue', due to the green chili paste. Some add fried pulverised nga phe and pork rind.

In the dry salad form, the same ingredients are mixed into a colourful combination. The red chili paste and oil gives the white rice vermicelli the yellow colour.

Mandalay mont di[edit]

Mandalay mont di (Burmese: မန္တလေးမုန့်တီ) is quite different from Rakhine mont di. It uses meat instead of marine fish, as Mandalay is an inland city located in Central Myanmar. The meat is cooked as a sauce and added to the noodles like a salad. Another difference is that larger rice noodles is used instead, similar to nan gyi thoke.

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References[edit]