Montenegrins of Kosovo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Part of a series on
Montenegrins
Coat of arms of Montenegro
By region or country
 
Recognized populations
Montenegro
Serbia
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Croatia
Republic of Macedonia
Kosovo
Albania
Diaspora
Europe
 · Austria · Denmark
France · Germany
Italy · Luxembourg
Russia · Slovenia
Sweden · Switzerland
United Kingdom
North America
United States · Canada
South America
Argentina · Chile
Bolivia · Brazil · Colombia
Oceania
Australia · New Zealand
Culture
Literature · Music · Art · Cinema
Cuisine · Dress · Sport
Religion
Roman Catholicism
Islam
Language and dialects
Montenegrin
History
History of Montenegro
Rulers

Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Montenegro. They form an ethnic minority in Kosovo.

The Montenegrins were primarily concentrated in the municipalities of Peć, Pristina, Kosovska Mitrovica, Istok, Deçan, and Gjakova, until 1961. In the period from 1961–1981, the Montenegrins disappeared from 243 settlements, which, combined with the 760 settlements that had no Montenegrin inhabitants in 1961, gives a total of 1,003 settlements without a single Montenegrin inhabitant. As a result of conflicts with the ethnically dominant Albanians, many Montenegrins moved from Kosovo to Montenegro or to Serbia proper.

The Republic of Kosovo has in December 2008 officially recognized the Montenegrin national minority in Kosovo.[1][2][3]

Demographics[edit]

  • 1948 census - 28,050 (3.9%)
  • 1953 census - 31,343 (3.9%)
  • 1961 census - 37,588 (3.9%)
    • Peć - 12,701 (33.8%)
  • 1971 census - 31,555 (2.5%)
  • 1981 census - 27,028 (1.7%)
  • 1991 census - 20,365 (1%)
  • 1995 unofficial estimate - around 7,000 (0.3%)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Crnogorci priznati na Kosovu". Radio Slobodna Evropa. 21 December 2008. Retrieved 25 December 2008. 
  2. ^ "Kosovski Crnogorci". BRAND. 24 December 2008. Retrieved 25 December 2008. 
  3. ^ "Crnogorci priznati na Kosovu". Radio Television of Montenegro. 21 December 2008. Retrieved 25 December 2008.