Montmagny, Quebec

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Montmagny
City
Saint Thomas Church
Saint Thomas Church
Location within Montmagny RCM.
Location within Montmagny RCM.
Montmagny is located in Southern Quebec
Montmagny
Montmagny
Location in province of Quebec.
Coordinates: 46°59′N 70°33′W / 46.983°N 70.550°W / 46.983; -70.550Coordinates: 46°59′N 70°33′W / 46.983°N 70.550°W / 46.983; -70.550[1]
Country  Canada
Province  Quebec
Region Chaudière-Appalaches
RCM Montmagny
Constituted April 2, 1966
Government[2]
 • Mayor Jean-Guy Desrosiers
 • Federal riding Montmagny—L'Islet—
Kamouraska—Rivière-
du-Loup
 • Prov. riding Côte-du-Sud
Area[2][3]
 • Total 145.00 km2 (55.98 sq mi)
 • Land 126.07 km2 (48.68 sq mi)
Population (2011)[3]
 • Total 11,491
 • Density 91.1/km2 (236/sq mi)
 • Pop 2006-2011 Increase 1.2%
 • Dwellings 5,512
Time zone EST (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC−4)
Postal code(s) G5V
Area code(s) 418 and 581
Highways
A-20 / TCH

Route 132
Route 228
Route 283
Website www.ville.
montmagny.qc.ca

Montmagny is a city in the Montmagny Regional County Municipality within the Chaudière-Appalaches region of Quebec. It is the county seat. Its population as of the Canada 2011 Census was 11,491.

The city is located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River east of Quebec City and was founded more than 350 years ago. It is Canada's Snow Goose Capital. Festivals include the International Accordion Festival in September and the Festival of the Snow Geese in October.

The city was named after Charles Jacques Huault de Montmagny, the first governor of New France. Samuel de Champlain was commander in chief.

Geographical Location[edit]

Chutes de la Rivière du Sud

Montmagny is north west of Notre-Dame mountains which is the official -but not most commonly used- designation of the Canadian extension of the Green Mountains as they are called in New England. While Monts Notre Dame is the official name, the vast majority of people living in the area stretching between Quebec City and the Gaspe peninsula refer to them as simply "the Appalachians" (French: les Appalaches) which is the origin of the official designation of the region comprising Quebec City's South Shore suburbia extending to the US border to the east and northeast, known as Chaudière-Appalaches after the mountains and the main river flowing down from them into the St. Lawrence.

The city of Montmagny itself is parted by the South River (French: Rivière du Sud), where a smaller river named Bras-Saint-Nicolas merges into it. The confluence of waters swells into a set of falls leading to discharge into the Saint-Lawrence a short distance west of the city.

Montmagny is the seat of the judicial district of Montmagny.[4]

Economy[edit]

The industrial sector is the backbone of the economy. However, the city lost many jobs when Whirlpool closed its activities on May 13, 2004, incurring the lost of 600 jobs. The city has rebounded from that period. Textile industry has also made employment for decades. A post-secondary institution, The Centre d'études collégiales de Montmagny, a hospital, named Hôtel-Dieu de Montmagny and a provincial jail are part of the economy.

Notable people[edit]

  • Etienne-Paschal Tache, twice Premier of the Province of Canada, President of the Quebec Conference, 1864, considered a Father of Confederation.
  • Thrulane James Rose, Twice voted Supreme Champion - Royal Agricultural Winter Fair (RAWF) (2008, 2009) among a long list of titles and honours, and one of the most 'highly decorated' dairy cows in North America. The prized Holstein was raised on Pierre Boulet's dairy farm.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Montmagny
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 14
(57)
13
(55)
19
(66)
30
(86)
32.2
(90)
35
(95)
36
(97)
33.3
(91.9)
30.5
(86.9)
24.5
(76.1)
22
(72)
21
(70)
36
(97)
Average high °C (°F) −7.2
(19)
−5.2
(22.6)
0.4
(32.7)
7.5
(45.5)
16.2
(61.2)
21.9
(71.4)
24.8
(76.6)
23.4
(74.1)
17.7
(63.9)
10.7
(51.3)
3.3
(37.9)
−3.8
(25.2)
9.1
(48.4)
Daily mean °C (°F) −11.9
(10.6)
−10
(14)
−4.3
(24.3)
3
(37)
10.7
(51.3)
16.3
(61.3)
19.2
(66.6)
18
(64)
12.9
(55.2)
6.5
(43.7)
−0.2
(31.6)
−8
(18)
4.4
(39.9)
Average low °C (°F) −16.5
(2.3)
−14.8
(5.4)
−8.9
(16)
−1.5
(29.3)
5.1
(41.2)
10.7
(51.3)
13.6
(56.5)
12.6
(54.7)
8
(46)
2.2
(36)
−3.7
(25.3)
−12.1
(10.2)
−0.5
(31.1)
Record low °C (°F) −37
(−35)
−31.7
(−25.1)
−32
(−26)
−19
(−2)
−6.1
(21)
−2.5
(27.5)
2
(36)
1
(34)
−4.5
(23.9)
−7.8
(18)
−20
(−4)
−32
(−26)
−37
(−35)
Precipitation mm (inches) 85.1
(3.35)
61.7
(2.429)
73.3
(2.886)
81.1
(3.193)
101.5
(3.996)
105.2
(4.142)
129.2
(5.087)
119.2
(4.693)
115.6
(4.551)
103.6
(4.079)
90.4
(3.559)
87.6
(3.449)
1,153.5
(45.413)
Source: Environment Canada[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]