Moorestown, New Jersey

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Moorestown, New Jersey
Township
Township of Moorestown
Moorestown Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Moorestown Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Moorestown Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Moorestown Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°58′37″N 74°56′42″W / 39.977074°N 74.944998°W / 39.977074; -74.944998Coordinates: 39°58′37″N 74°56′42″W / 39.977074°N 74.944998°W / 39.977074; -74.944998[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 11, 1922
Government[7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Chris Chiacchio (term ends December 31, 2014)[3] [4]
 • Manager D. Scott Carew[5]
 • Clerk Patricia L. Hunt[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 14.918 sq mi (38.638 km2)
 • Land 14.693 sq mi (38.055 km2)
 • Water 0.225 sq mi (0.583 km2)  1.51%
Area rank 176th of 566 in state
16th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 69 ft (21 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 20,726
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 20,713
 • Rank 125th of 566 in state
7th of 40 in county[13]
 • Density 1,410.6/sq mi (544.6/km2)
 • Density rank 343rd of 566 in state
20th of 40 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08057[14][15]
Area code(s) 609 and 856[16]
FIPS code 3400547880[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882095[19][2]
Website www.moorestown.nj.us

Moorestown is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States and an eastern suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 20,726,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 1,709 (+9.0%) from the 19,017 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,901 (+18.0%) from the 16,116 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Moorestown was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 11, 1922, from portions of Chester Township (now Maple Shade Township), based on the results of a referendum held on April 25, 1922.[21]

The township banned all liquor sales in 1915 and retained the restrictions after Prohibition ended in 1933. Referenda aiming to repeal the ban failed in both 1935 and 1953. In 2007, the Township Council approved a referendum that would allow the sale by auction of six liquor licenses (the state limit of one per every 3,000 residents), with estimates that each license could sell over $1 million each.[22] The referendum did not receive enough votes to pass. In 2011, voters repealed the liquor ban; however, liquor sales in the township will be restricted to the Moorestown Mall.[23]

In 2005 Moorestown was ranked number one in Money magazine's list of the 100 best places to live in America.[24] The magazine screened over a thousand small towns and created a list of the top 100 for its August 2005 issue, in which Moorestown earned the top spot because of its community feeling, in addition to plentiful jobs within the commuting area, excellent schools, low crime rate, and affordable housing. Another attribute is its proximity to Philadelphia (about a 15-minute commute), a center of jobs and cultural and urban amenities.

Geography[edit]

Moorestown is located at 39°58′37″N 74°56′42″W / 39.977074°N 74.944998°W / 39.977074; -74.944998 (39.977074,-74.944998). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 14.918 square miles (38.638 km2), of which, 14.693 square miles (38.055 km2) of it was land and 0.225 square miles (0.583 km2) of it (1.51%) was water.[1][2]

The township is located in southwest Burlington County and borders Maple Shade Township to the south, Cinnaminson Township and Delran Township to the west, Willingboro Township on the north and Mount Laurel Township to the east. Moorestown Township is approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of Philadelphia.

Moorestown-Lenola is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located within Moorestown, which had a 2010 population of 14,217.[25] Other place names used within Moorestown include North Bend, Stanwick, Northwest Estates. Some of the neighborhoods in Moorestown are West Moorestown, East Moorestown, South Moorestown, and Downtown Moorestown.[26]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 7,247
1940 7,749 6.9%
1950 9,123 17.7%
1960 12,497 37.0%
1970 15,577 24.6%
1980 15,596 0.1%
1990 16,116 3.3%
2000 19,017 18.0%
2010 20,726 9.0%
Est. 2012 20,713 [12] −0.1%
Population sources:
1930-2000[27] 1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[9][10][11]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 20,726 people, 7,450 households, and 5,625 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,410.6 per square mile (544.6 /km2). There were 7,862 housing units at an average density of 535.1 per square mile (206.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 84.50% (17,513) White, 6.42% (1,331) Black or African American, 0.09% (18) Native American, 6.00% (1,244) Asian, 0.02% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.81% (168) from other races, and 2.16% (447) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.48% (721) of the population.[9]

There were 7,450 households, of which 38.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.5% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.21.[9]

In the township, 27.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 19.0% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.4 years. For every 100 females there were 91.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.1 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $108,655 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,347) and the median family income was $129,217 (+/- $6,334). Males had a median income of $100,266 (+/- $4,901) versus $60,057 (+/- $11,139) for females. The per capita income for the township was $58,458 (+/- $3,172). About 1.4% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.[32]

2000 Census[edit]

At the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 19,017 people, 6,971 households, and 5,270 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,287.3 per square mile (497.1/km²). There were 7,211 housing units at an average density of 488.1 per square mile (188.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 89.19% White, 5.69% African American, 0.16% Native American, 3.27% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 1.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.75% of the population.[30][31]

There were 6,971 households of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.3% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.13.[30][31]

Age distribution was 27.4% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.9 males.[30][31]

The median household income was $78,826, and the median family income was $94,844. Males had a median income of $74,773 versus $39,148 for females. The per capita income for the township was $42,154. About 2.4% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Aerial view of Moorestown

Local government[edit]

Moorestown's municipal government operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under Council-Manager plan E, which was implemented as of January 1, 1967, based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission.[33] A five-member Council is elected at-large on a partisan basis, with each member serving a four-year term of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election in even years.[7] At a reorganization meeting held in January after each election, the council selects a mayor and a deputy mayor from among its members.

The Township Manager, a full-time professional administrator, is appointed by the Council. Under the Township's administrative code and the Faulkner Act, the Manager has the township's executive and administrative authority and responsibility. The current Township Manager is Scott Carew.[34]

As of 2013, members of the Moorestown Township Council are Mayor Chris Chiacchio (R, term ends December 31, 2014), Deputy Mayor Stacey Jordan (R, 2014), Phil Garwood (R, 2016), Victoria Napolitano (R, 2016) and J. Greg Newcomer (D, 2016).[35][36][37][38]

In 2004, Moorestown elected a majority Democratic council for the first time in its history. In 2008, the Moorestown Republicans won back three seats, giving them a 4-1 majority starting in 2009. On Election Day 2012, Republicans Victoria Napolitano (5,580 votes), and Phil Garwood (5,467 votes), along with Democrat J. Greg Newcomer (5,345 votes), won election to the three open seats on the Township Council, outpacing Republican Pete Palko (5,321 votes) and Democrats Brian Sattinger (4,899 votes) and Mark Hines (4,869 votes).[39] Republicans maintained a 4-1 majority, and Stacey Jordan was sworn in as Moorestown's first female Mayor on January 7, 2013.[40]

During the summer of 2007, the Township Hall suffered smoke and water damage caused by an electrical fire.[41] The township offices are now located in temporary quarters at 2 Executive Place, Moorestown Township Council meetings are now held at the William Allen Middle School Auditorium and court sessions are conducted in Maple Shade.[42] On December 10, 2012, Town Council members John Button, Greg Gallo, Stacey Jordan, Chris Chiacchio, and Mike Testa, along with Councilmembers-elect Victoria Napolitano and Greg Newcomer, broke ground on the new Town Hall, scheduled to be completed in early 2014[43]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Moorestown is located in the 3rd Congressional District[44] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[10][45][46] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Moorestown Township had been in the 8th state legislative district.[47]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[48] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[49][50] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[51][52]

The 7th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Delanco Township) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[53] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[54] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[55]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[56] The board choose a director and deputy director from among its seven members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[56] As of 2013, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2013; Cinnaminson Township),[57] Deputy Director Leah Arter (R, 2014; Moorestown Township),[58] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[59] Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[60] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[61][56]

Education[edit]

The Moorestown Township Public Schools serves students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics)[62] are George C. Baker Elementary School[63] (grades K-3; 409 students), Mary E. Roberts Elementary School[64] (K-3; 325), South Valley Elementary School[65] (PreK-3; 436), Moorestown Upper Elementary School[66] (4-6; 976) William Allen Middle School[67] (7-8; 708) and Moorestown High School[68] (9-12; 1,404).[69]

Students from Medford Lakes, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[70]

Moorestown Friends School is a private Quaker school located at East Main Street and Chester Avenue. The school serves approximately 700 students from Pre-School through 12th grade.[71]

History[edit]

Roberts Monument
Friends Meeting House

Main Street (formerly the King's Highway) follows a ridge that had been occupied by the historic Lenni Lenape Native Americans. Two fine springs, one to the west (off Main Street before reaching the Perkins Center for the Arts, just by Roberts Elementary School) and one to the east (off North Stanwick Road) drew Native Americans and traders to the area.

In 1682, John and Sarah Roberts became the first English-speaking residents of Moorestown when they began to live in their home where the Roberts Monument is presently located on County Route 537 at the intersection with Route 73.[72][73] In May 1686, three years after the founding of Philadelphia, John Rodman bought 500 acres (2.0 km2) on the west side of Chester Township, and Thomas Rodman bought 533 acres (2.2 km2) in the same area; this soon became known as the Village of Rodmantown. The growing area around the eastern spring was known as the Village of Chestertown.[74]

In 1700, the first Society of Friends’ Meeting House, built of logs, was erected on the King’s Highway. Originally known as Meeting House Lane, Chester Avenue was laid out in 1720. The community at that time probably consisted of a few farmhouses along the King's Highway from Stanwick Road to Locust Street.[75]

Thomas Moore and his wife Elizabeth settled here in 1722. In 1732, Moore purchased 33 acres (130,000 m2) of land on the north side of the King's Highway. The land ran from the west side of the Friends' graveyard on the northwest corner of the King’s Highway and Meeting House Lane on the east, and west to Locust Street on the western boundary of his property and north to Second Street. Moore set up a hotel on the northwest corner of the King’s Highway and Union streets (Cornerstone Bank and the Wawa now occupy opposite corners there). Given Moore's extensive property ownership, the name Moorestown gradually replaced Chester informally in the center of town. Finally, Moorestown formerly split off from Chester and became a Township.[21]

The Coles Hotel, east of the corner of Main and Chester, was a stop on the stagecoach route connecting Camden with Trenton and Philadelphia. Construction of the railroad in 1867 superseded the stagecoaches and connected Mount Holly Township and Camden.[76]

A tavern built in 1745 by John Cox at what is now Main and Schooley streets was taken over in 1778 during the Revolutionary War by Hessian officers retreating from Philadelphia. In the years after the war, it was used for a town hall before 1812, when what is now called "Old Town Hall" was constructed.[77]

A house constructed in 1742 by John Cowperthwaite at King's Highway and Lenola Road is listed in the Library of Congress with details of the house recorded in 1937 by the Historic American Buildings Survey of the United States Department of the Interior.[77]

Quakers built Moorestown's first two schools in 1785. A brick schoolhouse was located near what is now the intersection of Route 73 and the Kings Highway overpass. A stone schoolhouse was located adjacent to the present Friends Meeting House at the intersection of Chester Avenue and Main Street. The first district school was opened in 1810. The first free Moorestown public school was established in 1873.[71]

Vernon Hill's 46,000 square feet (4,300 m2) mansion Villa Collina — Italian for "Hill House" — the largest private residence in New Jersey, is located in Moorestown.[78]

Moorestown's Quaker heritage is discussed in Moorestown resident and native historian William H. Kingston's book, Moorestown's Third Century: The Quaker Legacy.

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 123.52 miles (198.79 km) of roadways, of which 96.15 miles (154.74 km) are maintained by the municipality, 24.65 miles (39.67 km) by Burlington County and 2.72 miles (4.38 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[79]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to Philadelphia on routes 317 (from Asbury Park, 407 From Moorestown Mall), and 409 (from Trenton bus routes, with local service available on the 457 route between Moorestown Mall and Camden.[80][81]

Moorestown does not have its own train station, as residents have historically been opposed to the concept, though the original plan of the PATCO line had a train stopping in Moorestown.[82] Residents can drive to train stations in the nearby communities of Haddonfield and Lindenwold, for access to the PATCO Speedline and to Palmyra for New Jersey Transit's River Line service which connects to New York Penn Station through Trenton. New Jersey Transit Rail Operations still owns the single-track railway in the township, running from Pennsauken to Mount Holly, as a railbank.

Transportation of "Miracle on the Hudson" US Airways Flight 1549[edit]

On June 5, 2011, J. Supor & Son transported the fuselage of US Airways Flight 1549 through Moorestown en route to the Carolinas Aviation Museum in Charlotte North Carolina. The convoy spent over 1.5 hours working to negotiate a single right turn in the center of the town. This was the most difficult maneuver on the entire seven-day, 788-mile journey. The difficulty of this one turn was known in advance. In order to negotiate the turn the team had to temporarily remove a street light and the corner of a grave yard fence.[83]

Industry[edit]

Several notable businesses house offices and operations in Moorestown. National and international corporations located in Moorestown Township include Lockheed Martin, Comcast Cable, Coca-Cola, and the United States Navy.

BAYADA Home Health Care, which employs over 18,000 nursing support staff in 250 offices throughout the United States and India, has its international headquarters in Moorestown.[84]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Moorestown Township include:

Moorestown in fiction[edit]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Moorestown Township has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[140]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ [2]
  5. ^ Township Manager, Moorestown, New Jersey. Accessed June 26, 2012.
  6. ^ Township Clerk, Moorestown, New Jersey. Accessed June 26, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 43.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Moorestown, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Moorestown township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 11, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Moorestown township, Burlington County, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 5, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 15, 2013.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Moorestown, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 11, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Moorestown, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 26, 2012.
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  21. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 97. Accessed February 11, 2012.
  22. ^ Jones, Richard G. "A New Fight for a Holdout on Prohibition", The New York Times, July 17, 2007. Accessed July 19, 2007.
  23. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Moorestown repeals liquor ban", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 9, 2011. Accessed February 11, 2012. "After months of heated debate, Moorestown voters decisively approved a proposal to allow restaurants at Moorestown Mall to sell liquor in the historically dry community.... Voters in the community of 19,000 people were asked two questions: whether to permit liquor sales, and then whether to restrict the sales to mall restaurants. Unofficial tallies show the vote on the first question was 4,138 to 2,740, and on the second, 3,750 to 2,876."
  24. ^ Best places to live 2005, Money magazine. Accessed May 17, 2006.
  25. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Moorestown-Lenola CDP, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 26, 2012
  26. ^ New Jersey Localities, accessed September 9, 2006.
  27. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 17, 2013.
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  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Moorestown township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 11, 2012.
  33. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 8, 2013.
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  40. ^ Scott, Rob. " Councilwoman Tapped to be Moorestown's First Female MayorStacey Jordan is expected to be chosen as the new mayor at township council's reorganization meeting on Jan. 7.", MoorestownPatch, December 25, 2012. Accessed June 3, 2013.
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  42. ^ Comegno, Carol. "Moorestown extends town hall timetable", Courier-Post, January 26, 2010. Accessed April 12, 2011. "Court offices have moved to Maple Shade, most township offices are on Executive Drive and council has been meeting at the William Allen Middle School."
  43. ^ Scott, Rob. " Moorestown Town Hall Construction Will Start by Month's End; Construction crews are expected to install a fence today blocking off the library parking lot, which will remain up throughout construction.", MoorestownPatch, December 10, 2012. Accessed June 3, 2013.
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  59. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  60. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  61. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  62. ^ Data for the Moorestown Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  63. ^ George C. Baker Elementary School, Moorestown Township Public Schools. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  64. ^ Mary E. Roberts Elementary School, Moorestown Township Public Schools. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  65. ^ South Valley Elementary School, Moorestown Township Public Schools. Accessed October 8, 2013.
  66. ^ Moorestown Upper Elementary School, Moorestown Township Public Schools. Accessed October 8, 2013.
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  70. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  71. ^ a b History, Moorestown Friends School. Accessed February 11, 2012. "In 1785, members of the Religious Society of Friends (also known as Quakers) erected a little brick schoolhouse at a point where Kings Highway passes over Route 73, in present day Maple Shade. The same year, they built a one-room stone schoolhouse on land west of the present Moorestown Friends Meeting House, on what is now part of the site of Moorestown Friends School."
  72. ^ DeCou, George (1929). Moorestown and Her Neighbors; historical sketches. Philadelphia: Harris & Partridge, Inc., pp. 7-9.
  73. ^ Lamborn, Suzanne Parry (2006). John and Sarah Roberts, with many related families. Morgantown, Pennsylvania: Masthof Press, pp. 1-3. ISBN 1-932864-58-X
  74. ^ Chaplin, Philippa J. "All about King George's 'Great Road'", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 3, 2004. Accessed June 26, 2012. "To the northeast, the Lenni Lenape had settled near two springs in what is now Moorestown. It is not known exactly when the Indians left, but sometime after Kings Highway came through in 1682, two white settlements sprang up near the springs - Rodmantown on the west end, around today's Church and Main Streets, and Chestertown on the east, around Chester and Main, according to Stephanie Herz, librarian for the Moorestown Historical Society."
  75. ^ Pray, Rusty. "A little bit country and a little bit ritzy", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 20, 2004. Accessed June 26, 2012.
  76. ^ Staff. "Moorestown's buildings tell centuries of tales", Courier-Post, June 23, 1999. Accessed June 26, 2012. "For most of the 1800s, the stagecoach traveled Kings Highway from Camden to Trenton. Moorestown was divided by the coming of the railroad -- residents welcomed the convenience, but shopkeepers feared local business would suffer with the access to Philadelphia.... John T. Evans had a real estate office, and the Coles Hotel, demolished in 1925 to make room for the Burlington County Trust Company, was located at 91 East Main Street."
  77. ^ a b About Moorestown (1722 to 1922), Moorestown Township. Accessed February 11, 2012. "The old homestead on the northeast corner of King's Highway and Lenola Road was constructed in 1742 by John Cowperthwaite. Because of its excellent example of an 18th century home, record of its construction was made in 1937 by the U.S. Department of Interior and is now recorded in the Library of Congress."
  78. ^ Smith, Eileen and Walsh, Jim. "Hill's climb took bank to heights of industry", Asbury Park Press, June 30, 2007. Accessed July 25, 2007. "Hill and his wife Shirley built Villa Collina, literally Hill House, a 46,000-square-foot (4,300 m2) Tuscan-style mansion in Moorestown that is the biggest private residence in the state."
  79. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  80. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 22, 2010. Accessed February 11, 2012.
  81. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 17, 2013.
  82. ^ A History of Commitment, PATCO Speedline. Accessed June 26, 2012.
  83. ^ Persinko, Tim. "Miracle on Hudson Plane Gets Stuck in N.J.Plane that crash landed in the Hudson River has made another unscheduled stop, this time in Moorestown", WCAU, June 5, 2011. Accessed February 11, 2012. "The body of the Airbus A320, even without wings, is a bit too wide for an intersection in Moorestown, N.J., and its journey got stalled. Sitting on top of an over-sized flatbed trailer, the plane could not negotiate the turn at the corner of Maine Street and Chester Avenue."
  84. ^ Contact Us, BAYADA Home Health Care. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  85. ^ Senator Diane Allen's biography Accessed February 15, 2009. "Diane graduated from Moorestown High School as valedictorian."
  86. ^ New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame "Samuel Leeds Allen has been awarded almost 300 patents for farming machinery,..." "Because the production of farm equipment was seasonal, many of Allen's employees were laid off during the winter." "Allen invented the Flexible Flyer,..." Accessed July 25, 2008.
  87. ^ Bullock, Michael. "Cepero's return solidifies City Islanders goalkeeping situation", The Patriot-News, April 3, 2010. Accessed March 2, 2011. "Sam Bishop, the 27-year-old keeper who has logged three seasons (2005-07) with the City Islanders, spent the opening week of the expansion Philadelphia Union's first training camp working out with the first-year MLS club. Needless to say, it was a memorable experience for the Moorestown, N.J., native."
  88. ^ West Jersey History. Accessed January 9, 2011. "David Bispham, the great singer, whose boyhood days were spent in Moorestown, attended this school and some of our older residents who were students at that time tell interesting anecdotes about this celebrated man."
  89. ^ Assembly Member Francis L. Bodine, Project Vote Smart. Accessed August 8, 2007.
  90. ^ Pace, Eric. "Hugh Borton, 92, Expert on Japan and Ex-College President, Dies", The New York Times, August 9, 1995. Accessed February 11, 2012. "Dr. Borton was born in Moorestown, N.J., graduated from Haverford in 1926 and received an M.A. in history from Columbia in 1932. He was awarded several honorary degrees and was decorated by the postwar Japanese Government."
  91. ^ Donnellon, Sam. "Sam Donnellon / Moorestown's.", Philadelphia Daily News, June 22, 2007. Accessed March 1, 2011. "His future lay 1,805 miles away, on the easternmost point of an island nearer the Arctic Circle than his Moorestown home. This is where the National Hockey League would discover T.J. Brennan."
  92. ^ Miller, Randy. "Moorestown native scores in debut for Buffalo Sabres", Courier-Post, November 25, 2011. Accessed December 3, 2011. "Moorestown native T.J. Brennan showed what he can bring in his NHL debut for the Buffalo Sabres."
  93. ^ T J Brennan, Toronto Maple Leafs. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  94. ^ Elane, Patricia. "Sports' Rookie Athletes - Too Much, Too Soon? Sports Agent and Former NFL Player Sees an 'Achilles Heel' in Toay's Recruiting Practices", Yahoo! Voices, August 9, 2006. Accessed June 3, 2013. "Dr. Lem Burnham, a resident of Moorestown, New Jersey, has seen more than his fair share of action both on and off the field in the NFL."
  95. ^ Gardner, Amanda. "Theater; Tony Awards' New Jersey Ties", The New York Times, June 3, 2001. Accessed July 23, 2008. "Kevin Chamberlin (best performance by a leading actor in a musical, Seussical) also traces his childhood and early career to New Jersey. Mr. Chamberlin moved to Moorestown (exit 4) when he was 7 years old and worked summers as a singing waiter at the Show Place in Beach Haven on Long Beach Island."
  96. ^ The Ice Man Accessed July 26, 2008: "On Comcast's website, he's 'the ultimate Flyer' who's married to wife Sandy, has four children (sons Wade and Lucas and daughters Jody and Jakki) and resides in Moorestown, N.J."
  97. ^ Gary Close, Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  98. ^ Traughber, Bill. "Josh Cody, a College Football Hall of Famer", Vanderbilt Commodores football, September 30, 2009. Accessed March 1, 2011. "In 1959, Cody retired to his 190-acre farm across the Delaware River in Moorestown, N.J. He died on his farm in 1961 at age 69."
  99. ^ John Collins Biography, Miami Beach History. Accessed March 13, 2008. "Born on December 29, 1837, in Moorestown, New Jersey, John Stiles Collins was the sixth generation of Collinses to farm the family's western New Jersey homestead since 1678."
  100. ^ Phil Costa, Maryland Terrapins football. Accessed March 2, 2011.
  101. ^ Phil Costa, Dallas Cowboys
  102. ^ Waggoner, Walter H. "Edwin Forsythe, congressman, dies", The New York Times, March 30, 1984. Accessed March 2, 2011. "Representative Edwin B. Forsythe, a New Jersey Republican who served in the House of Representatives for 14 years, died of lung cancer yesterday at his home in Moorestown, N.J. He was 68 years old."
  103. ^ Walter French
  104. ^ Holloway, Lynette. "John F. Gerry, 69, Chief Judge Of Federal Court in New Jersey", The New York Times, March 12, 1995. Accessed June 3, 2013. "John Francis Gerry, the chief United States district judge in New Jersey for seven years and a former top official of the policy-making arm of the Federal bench, died on Friday at his home in Moorestown, N.J. He was 69."
  105. ^ Staff. "Guerin to Flyers? Speculation Bruin", Philadelphia Daily News, November 30, 2001. Accessed March 1, 2011. "Guerin spends his offseasons in Moorestown with his wife, Kara, and their three kids."
  106. ^ Staff. "Moorestown tells Hill that gate must go, Elaborate entrance at banker's estate violates zoning, officials say.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, December 18, 2002. Accessed March 1, 2011. "The drive-through lane at Commerce Bancorp chairman Vernon Hill's home will move a little faster starting today. Moorestown's zoning officer ordered Hill to remove the elaborate entrance gate at his 44.2-acre estate because it violates last month's zoning board decision that disallowed a tall fence that would have separated a portion of Hill's land from neighboring property."
  107. ^ Alfred Hunt's obituary "The announcement of the death of Alfred Hunt, president of the Bethlehem Iron Company, will be a shock to his numerous friends throughout the Lehigh Valley and the State. The sad event occurred last evening at the home of his brother, Mordecai Hunt, in Moorestown, N. J."
  108. ^ Hunt family history
  109. ^ Specht, Neva Jean (1997), Mixed blessing: trans-Appalachian settlement and the Society of Friends, 1780-1813, Ph. D. dissertation, University of Delaware
  110. ^ Specht, Neva Jean (2003), "Women of one or many bonnets?: Quaker women and the role of religion in trans-Appalachian settlement", NWSA Journal 15 (2): 27-44
  111. ^ Staff. "E.R. Johnson buyer of original 'Alice'; Pays $150,000 for Manuscript and Two Copies of Carroll's Famous Story. Will sent it on tour Former Head of Victor Talking Machine Company Will Never Sell It, He Says.", The New York Times, October 15, 1928. Accessed July 25, 2008.
  112. ^ Klein, Michael. "Inqlings: Throwback plan for Striped Bass", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 8, 2008. Accessed June 15, 2008. "Former Eagle Jevon Kearse has cut the asking price of his Moorestown five-bedroom from $3.1 million to $2,699,993."
  113. ^ Lulgjuraj, Susan. "Many Philadelphia Flyers past and present call Cape May County home", The Press of Atlantic City, May 24, 2010. Accessed March 1, 2011. "Tim Kerr has a huge presence in the Avalon and Stone Harbor area. The three-time All-Star played in Philadelphia for 11 seasons from 1980 to 1991 and holds Philadelphia's team record for the most 50-goal seasons with four. He owns Tim Kerr's Powerplay Realty on Dune Drive, which sells and rents homes in the Avalon and Stone Harbor area. For several years, Kerr also has run a charity run that bears his name. Kerr splits time between his homes in Avalon and Moorestown, Burlington County, said Tim Kerr Realty sales associate Ann Delaney."
  114. ^ Staff. "Great leap rightward? Nah, just finding balance", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 15, 2006. Accessed March 2, 2011. "Folks meet Jonathan V. Last. He was born in Camden 31 years ago grew up in Woodbury and Moorestown and now works as online editor for the Weekly Standard."
  115. ^ LeConey, Bill. "1924 gold medalist in family spurs press writer's search", The Press of Atlantic City, September 27, 2000. Accessed March 1, 2011. "J. Alfred LeConey was a great American sprinter of his time achieving local fame at Moorestown and then at Lafayette in the early 1920s."
  116. ^ New Jersey Mirror, March 2, 1938: "Death of William G. LeConey." "Surviving are his wife, Laura Haines LeConey, a very active worker in the First Baptist Church; and two sons, Everett LeConey, of Moorestown; and J. Alfred LeConey, of Plainfield. The latter was a winner in the Olympics at Paris in 1924 and upon his return to Moorestown, a great reception was held on the lawn of the LeConey home here to do him honor."
  117. ^ "Moorestown, N.J., named best town to live", USA Today, July 11, 2005. Accessed July 25, 2008. "Plenty of executives still inhabit its 15 square miles (39 km2). But the best-known citizens these days are a number of Philadelphia Eagles players, including star quarterback Donovan McNabb."
  118. ^ New Views VII - 2008 Literary Burlington County, Burlington County, New Jersey Historian. Accessed March 1, 2011. "Stephen W. Meader home, 565 East Main Street, Moorestown. Author of Children’s Books (1892-1977) . Stephen Meader, born to Quaker parents, wrote his first children’s book, The Black Buccaneer , in 1920. He moved his growing family to Moorestown in 1922 and by 1927, he had obtained a position with the Philadelphia advertising firm of N.W. Ayer & Son."
  119. ^ The Life of Stephen W. Meader "A third child, John, was born in 1921, and in 1922, the family moved to Moorestown, New Jersey." Accessed April 16, 2008.
  120. ^ Jones, Gordie. "Don't buy Andy's spin: draft sent Iggles a message", The Morning Call, April 24, 2005. Accessed February 11, 2012. "It was hard to hear him, because it sounded like somebody was hammering a 'For Sale' sign into the lawn in front of Freddie Mitchell's Moorestown, N.J., home."
  121. ^ Boyer, Dave. "Jones, Gordie. [http://articles.mcall.com/2005-04-24/sports/3609037_1_defensive-linemen-andy-reid-receiver "Don't buy Andy's spin: draft sent Iggles a message", The Morning Call, April 24, 2005. Accessed February 11, 2012. "It was hard to hear him, because it sounded like somebody was hammering a 'For Sale' sign into the lawn in front of Freddie Mitchell's Moorestown, N.J., home.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 11, 2004. Accessed February 12, 2012. "Owens isn't the first Eagle to live in Moorestown. Quarterback Donovan McNabb lives there, too. And wide receiver Freddie Mitchell has lived in Moorestown the last few years, although he's moving. Mitchell got into a dispute with a neighbor over trees, and has been looking for a place that is - repeat after me, T.O. - quieter than Moorestown."
  122. ^ Guenther, Alan. "Feud roils race for Saxton's seat", Asbury Park Press, November 24, 2007. Accessed December 2, 2013. "The next day, he touted the candidacy of Moorestown resident David A. Norcross, who's been active with the national Republican Party."
  123. ^ Proclamation honoring Master Sergeant Brendan O'Connor by the Township Council of Moorestown Township
  124. ^ MilitaryTimes Hall of Valor
  125. ^ via The Washington Post. "GOP candidate Christine O'Donnell's stunning Senate primary win raises questions about her past", The Plain Dealer, September 19, 2010. Accessed March 1, 2011. "O'Donnell, 41, grew up in Moorestown, N.J., and attended Fairleigh Dickinson University, though she did not earn her degree until this year."
  126. ^ Reid: T.O. will not play for Eagles this season, ESPN.com, November 8, 2005.
  127. ^ Alice Paul House, Moorestown, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. Accessed July 25, 2008.
  128. ^ "Football preview: Moorestown".
  129. ^ Staff. "Samuel K. Robbins", The New York Times, December 6, 1926. Accessed March 1, 2011.
  130. ^ via Associated Press. "Pageant life teaches new Miss N.J. Moorestown woman learns about competition, herself", Burlington County Times, June 20, 2005. Accessed March 1, 2011. "Julie Robenhymer, the reigning Miss Burlington County and the newly crowned Miss New Jersey, isn't entirely comfortable with being called beautiful. 'It's very weird,' she said. The 24-year-old Moorestown native would rather talk about how competing in beauty pageants gave her confidence and self-worth."
  131. ^ Ginsberg, Wendy. "New Magazine Aims to Be Social Guide for Southern New Jersey Suburbs", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 17, 2002. Accessed March 8, 2008. "The monthly magazine, which aims to be a social guide for South Jerseyans, was relaunched this month with the toothy grin of Philadelphia Flyer Jeremy Roenick, a Moorestown resident, gracing the cover."
  132. ^ "Inside Jon Runyan's New Crib", WPVI, November 17, 2007. Accessed June 15, 2008. "The man is Philadelphia Eagle Jon Runyan, and the house is located in Moorestown, New Jersey."
  133. ^ Staff. "Sabol's seen many Super moments", The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 3, 2008. Accessed March 1, 2011. ""Steve Sabol, president of the Mount Laurel-based NFL Films and a resident of Moorestown, has been at all of these title games, documenting the events..."
  134. ^ Samuelsson, Ulf. "Ulf Samuelsson's Blog: The transition to coaching", The Hockey News, October 24, 2008. Accessed March 1, 2011. "I got into a number of things, like restaurants and car dealerships. For a while, we had three dealerships going in Pittsburgh and we sold a lot on eBay. It was fun to go out and try many things that I couldn’t when I was playing hockey. My family and I stayed in New Jersey, in a great town called Moorestown Township."
  135. ^ "A S. Jersey girl takes the crown of Miss America, but she's Miss Illinois.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 14, 1977. Accessed February 11, 2012. "Moorestown native and Bishop Eustace graduate Katherine Shindle was named Miss America 1998 last night, topping an all-vocalist field of five finalists in the 77th annual competition."
  136. ^ Staff. "Vanbiesbrouck ready for spotlight - The new goalie knows he was no. 3 on shopping lists during the free-agent period. He's eager to show that the flyers picked the right one", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 8, 1998. Accessed March 1, 2011. "He has three sons - Ian, Ben and Nicholas - and lives in Moorestown."
  137. ^ Staff. "Wilson, Helen Van Pelt", Westport News (Connecticut), October 24, 2003. Accessed November 17, 2013. "Born in Collingswood, N.J., Oct. l9, l901, she grew up in nearby Moorestown, went to the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr and graduated cum laude from Bryn Mawr College in 1923."
  138. ^ Albert Young, Iowa Hawkeyes football. Accessed May 25, 2008.
  139. ^ Pucin, Diane via The Philadelphia Inquirer. "U.S. rowers put 3 boats into finals", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 27, 1996. Accessed March 1, 2011. "Young, from Moorestown, has chosen to row in the quad, a sculling boat in a country where the sculling boats are always of lowest priority."
  140. ^ Climate Summary for Moorestown Township, New Jersey

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • DeCou, George (1929). Moorestown and her neighbors; historical sketches. OCLC 722953. 
  • Kingston, William H. Moorestown's third century: the Quaker legacy. OCLC 9436832. 
  • Lawrence Smith, Robert (1997). A Quaker Book of Wisdom. ISBN 0-688-15653-3.