Moraine, Ohio

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This article is about the city in Ohio. For other uses, see Moraine (disambiguation).
Moraine, Ohio
City
Downtown Moraine
Downtown Moraine
Motto: "progress through unity"
Location of Moraine, Ohio
Location of Moraine, Ohio
Location within Montgomery County, Ohio
Location within Montgomery County, Ohio
Coordinates: 39°41′44″N 84°13′40″W / 39.69556°N 84.22778°W / 39.69556; -84.22778Coordinates: 39°41′44″N 84°13′40″W / 39.69556°N 84.22778°W / 39.69556; -84.22778
Country United States
State Ohio
County Montgomery
Government
 • Mayor Elaine Allison[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 9.52 sq mi (24.66 km2)
 • Land 9.25 sq mi (23.96 km2)
 • Water 0.27 sq mi (0.70 km2)
Elevation[3] 738 ft (225 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 6,307
 • Estimate (2012[5]) 6,316
 • Density 681.8/sq mi (263.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45439
Area code(s) 937
FIPS code 39-52010[6]
GNIS feature ID 1048984[3]
Website http://www.ci.moraine.oh.us/index.php

Moraine is a city in Montgomery County, Ohio, United States. The population was 6,307 at the 2010 census.[7] The city is part of the Dayton Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Montgomery county. Moraine, as part of the Dayton area, is situated within the Miami Valley region of Ohio, just north of the Cincinnati metropolitan area. The city is also home to the outdoor waterpark Splash Moraine.

Geography[edit]

Moraine is located at 39°41′44″N 84°13′40″W / 39.69556°N 84.22778°W / 39.69556; -84.22778 (39.695650, -84.227677)[8].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 9.52 square miles (24.66 km2), of which, 9.25 square miles (23.96 km2) is land and 0.27 square miles (0.70 km2) is water.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 2,262
1970 4,898 116.5%
1980 5,325 8.7%
1990 5,985 12.4%
2000 6,897 15.2%
2010 6,307 −8.6%
Est. 2012 6,316 0.1%
Sources:[9][10][6][11]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 6,307 people, 2,613 households, and 1,625 families residing in the city. The population density was 681.8 inhabitants per square mile (263.2 /km2). There were 2,918 housing units at an average density of 315.5 per square mile (121.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 81.1% White, 12.4% African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.4% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.6% of the population.

There were 2,613 households of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.2% were married couples living together, 17.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.8% were non-families. 30.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.96.

The median age in the city was 37 years. 23.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.5% were from 25 to 44; 26.8% were from 45 to 64; and 12.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.9% male and 51.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 6,897 people, 2,855 households, and 1,818 families residing in the city. The population density was 760.3 people per square mile (293.6/km²). There were 3,127 housing units at an average density of 344.7 per square mile (133.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 89.53% White, 6.23% African American, 0.43% Native American, 2.00% Asian, 0.51% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.41% of the population.

There were 2,855 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.0% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.3% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 34.3% from 25 to 44, 19.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,341, and the median income for a family was $41,792. Males had a median income of $35,133 versus $23,994 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,880. About 6.8% of families and 9.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.6% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

What is now the city of Moraine was once a part of Van Buren Township followed by brief period as a part of Kettering. Citizens of the Moraine area seceded from Kettering forming the new Moraine Township in 1953, before incorporating as a municipality in 1957.[12] Moraine later annexed parts of Miami and Jefferson townships.

Manufacturing[edit]

Moraine is well known for its manufacturing history. From 1917-1923 the Dayton-Wright Airplane company operated an aircraft manufacturing plant on the current site of the modern day Moraine Assembly (closed). During its years of operation over 4000 aircraft were built including the DeHavilland observer/bomber plane (a first world war British design).

Dayton-Wright was sold to General Motors in 1919 and GM exited the aircraft business in 1923. In 1926, General Motors enlarged upgraded the plant and used it to build refrigerators. Frigidaire continued to manufacture appliances on the site until 1979 when GM sold Frigidaire.

General Motors decided to keep the plant and retool it to produce vehicles. In 1981 the plant reopened and manufactured the Chevrolet S-10 Blazer. In the 1990s a paint shop, and the DMAX engine plant was added to the site as a joint venture with Isuzu. The plant continued to manufacture SUVs from the General Motors product line (Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Buick) until 2008 when the plant closed. The DMAX engine plant still remains open and has recently expanded.

The total history of the plant includes 86 years of manufacturing.[13]

As of April 2011, the GM Moraine Assembly is currently awaiting federal approval of a sale from Motors Liquidation Company to the Industry Realty Group who plants to redevelop the site for multiple commercial and industrial tenants.[14]

Government[edit]

Moraine is served by a Council-Manager form of government, where a seven-member City Council appoints a professional City Manager, who serves as the administrative head of the City.

The City Council of Moraine, Ohio consists of 7 members. A Mayor and two Council Members-at-Large are elected by the entire city, while four additional members of Council are elected to represent each of four wards. The Mayor presides over meetings of the Council as chairman, and may vote as a member of Council, but has no veto. In recent years, several mayors have been recalled and removed from office.[15]

Moraine has a municipal income tax of 2%.[16]

Growing City[edit]

I-75 Exit 47 reconstruction[edit]

The Interstate 75 highway exit to Moraine reconstruction has been completed. The new interchange allows motorists to more easily enter I-75 North from Moraine and also allow Moraine’s neighbor city, West Carrollton, to enter I-75 S without having to first enter the City of Moraine and then execute a U-turn.

The new entrances include; southbound Dixie Drive access to I-75N, northbound Central Avenue access to I-75S, I-75N access to southbound Dixie Drive and I-75S to access South Dixie Drive. The project also makes it possible to execute a left turn at Dryden Road onto Dixie Drive.

The exit was originally built in the early 1960s and never completed into a traditional highway exit until 2012.[17]

New subdivision[edit]

A new 34 acre subdivision was created on the eastern side(bordering Miami Township and Kettering, OH) of the City of Moraine in 2007. Oak Pointe subdivision has 4 cul-de-sacs with 103 home sites that measure (70'x 125'). Lighted streets and utilities are already installed. The subdivision also has two pedestrian bridges that cross a creek to allow direct access to C.F. Holiday park and elementary school. The subdivision is currently being developed by 5 builders chosen by the city.[18]

Ellerton Cemetery[edit]

The City operates Ellerton Cemetery, a 5-acre (20,000 m2) site located on Union Road. The Cemetery was opened in 1815, and still conducts burials as of January 2010. Due to its association with the adjacent Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church, the cemetery is on the National Register of Historic Places.[19]

Entertainment and recreation[edit]

Cuisine[edit]

Moraine is well known for its established neighborhood eateries. Restaurants like the Treasure Island Supper Club and Dixie Dairy Dreem have operated for over 50 years. In addition, there are popular locally-owned restaurants such as Voltzy’s Root Beer Stand, Chappy’s Tap Room and 4200 Place.

Parks[edit]

Moraine also has an excellent parks department that includes an indoor recreational center (Payne Recreation Center), a civic center(Gerhardt), bike trails and system of small neighborhood parks. The Deer Meadow Park has a skate park and pond that is stocked with bluegill, catfish, bass & perch. The park entrance connects to the city’s 3 mile bike trail that follows Pinnacle road to Main Street and then connects to the Great Miami Recreational Trail.

Three of Moraine's neighborhood parks have recently been renovated with new playground equipment, C.F. Holliday School Park received new equipment in 2009, as well as two walking bridges connecting the park to the new Oak Pointe subdivision that is currently being developed. Ora Everetts Park (adjacent to the Gerhardt Civic Center) received $15,000 in new equipment in 2010. Lehigh Park is in the process of being renovated with $28,000 worth of new playground equipment.

The city offers free garden plots to its residents on 12 acres located in a rural section of the city. Moraine also operates a boat ramp on East River Road to allow access to the Great Miami River, which passes through the center of the city.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McAllister, Kristin (2011-02-08). "Moraine chooses acting mayor to finish late mayor’s term". Dayton Daily News. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  6. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder2". Retrieved 2010-03-20. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  12. ^ About the City, City of Moraine, Ohio 2006. Accessed 2008-01-05.
  13. ^ "The Rise and Fall of GM at Moraine". Daytontoloy. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  14. ^ "Master Plan for Former GM Site". Dayton Daily News. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  15. ^ McAllister, Kristin (2009-10-29). "Moraine candidates believe attracting business top priority". Dayton Daily News. p. RG1. 
  16. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions, Income Tax". City of Moraine, Ohio. Archived from the original on 2007-07-03. Retrieved 2007-10-24. 
  17. ^ "Work to Begin on Exit 47". Dayton Daily News. 02-17-11. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  18. ^ "OakPoine". City of Moraine. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  19. ^ "Site Reference Number 90001291". Ohio Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2006-09-13. 
  20. ^ "Parks and Recreation". City of Moraine. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 

External links[edit]