Morane-Saulnier AR

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Type AR, MS.35
Charles Nungesser et sa fiancée - Morane, 1923.jpg
Role Trainer
National origin France
Manufacturer Morane-Saulnier
First flight 1915
Primary user Aéronautique Militaire
Number built >400

The Morane-Saulnier AR was a trainer aircraft produced in France during and after the First World War.[1][2] Developed from the Morane-Saulnier LA reconnaissance aircraft, it was a wire-braced parasol-wing monoplane of conventional design with two open cockpits in tandem and cross-axle-style tailskid undercarriage.[2] Construction was mostly of fabric-covered wood, but the forward fuselage was skinned in metal.[1]

Large-scale production commenced after the Armistice, with the type now designated MS.35, in a number of subtypes differentiated principally in the engine used.[1][2] Although Morane-Saulnier hoped to sell the type on the civil market as a touring machine,[3] most of the 400 examples built saw service with the French Army, but others were used by the Navy and still others exported to foreign air arms.[1][2] The MS.35s remained in service in France until 1929, after which time some were sold to the nation's flying clubs.[2]


Variants[edit]

  • Type AR
  • MS.35R - main production version with Le Rhône 9C engine
  • MS.35A - version with Anzani engine
  • MS.35C - version with Clerget 9C engine

Operators[edit]

 France
 Argentina
 Belgium
 Bolivia
 Brazil
 Greece
 Guatemala
 Paraguay
 Poland
  • (70 examples)
 Romania
 Soviet Union
  Switzerland
 Turkey
 United States
 Uruguay

Specifications (MS.35R)[edit]

Data from "Morane-Saulnier Type AR (M.S.35)"

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two, pilot and instructor
  • Length: 6.30 m (20 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 10.57 m (34 ft 8 in)
  • Gross weight: 764 kg (1,680 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Le Rhône 9C, 60 kW (80 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 125 km/h (78 mph)
  • Service ceiling: 4,600 m (15,100 ft)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Taylor 1989, 684
  2. ^ a b c d e "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft", 2538
  3. ^ "The Paris Aero Show 1919", 64

References[edit]

  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft. London: Aerospace Publishing. 
  • "The Paris Aero Show 1919". Flight: 63–70. 15 January 1920. Retrieved 2008-10-06. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 684. ISBN 0-7106-0710-5.