Moreton Bay College

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Moreton Bay College
Moreton Bay College crest.Source: www.mbc.qld.edu.au (Moreton Bay College website)
Latin: Fortitudine Et Spe
With Courage and Hope[1]
Location
Manly West, Queensland, Australia Australia
Coordinates 27°28′16″S 153°9′9″E / 27.47111°S 153.15250°E / -27.47111; 153.15250Coordinates: 27°28′16″S 153°9′9″E / 27.47111°S 153.15250°E / -27.47111; 153.15250
Information
Type Independent, Single-sex, Day school
Denomination Uniting Church[2]
Established 1901[3]
Chairman Geoffrey Diehm
Principal Jennifer Haynes
Chaplain Peter Hobson
Staff ~96[4]
Enrolment ~1,260 (P–12)[4]
Colour(s) Maroon and Gold, with pink often used to represent sporting teams         
Website

Moreton Bay College is an independent Uniting Church, day school for girls, located in Manly West, an outer suburb of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Established in 1901 as the Moreton Bay Girls' High School, by Alice J. Alison Greene and her sister Anne,[3] the college currently caters for approximately 1,257 students from Preschool to Year 12.[4]

Moreton Bay College is affiliated with the Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia (AHISA),[5] the Junior School Heads Association of Australia (JSHAA),[6] the Alliance of Girls' Schools Australasia (AGSA),[7] and first became a member of the Queensland Girls' Secondary Schools Sports Association (QGSSSA) in 1941.[8] Its brother school is Moreton Bay Boys' College.

History[edit]

Moreton Bay College was founded in 1901 by Miss Alice J. Alison Greene and her sister Anne, in a school specially designed and built by their father. Its location was in the heart of Wynnum town, on Bay Terrace, bounded by Charlotte and Florence Streets. The school was originally called Moreton Bay Girls’ High School and was intended to provide, in addition to classrooms and other rooms, boarding facilities for thirty boarders. The first roll contained six boarders and twenty day scholars.

In 1944, the Greene family handed the school over to the Methodist Church and for a year and a half Miss Elsie Greene was acting headmistress. The Methodist Church gave the school to the Presbyterian and Methodist Schools’ Association to administer and they appointed Miss Ellen Christensen in 1946 to the headship. Miss Christensen was the headmistress from 1946 to 1949 but family illness led to her absence, during which time Miss Popple was acting principal. Eventually Mrs Millicent Drewe was appointed and was headmistress from 1950 to 1964.

By 1956 the roll was 150 with twenty-seven candidates for Junior Public Examination. Girls did not sit for Senior until 1959 when there were 167 pupils in all. In 1957, the name was changed to Moreton Bay College, to avoid confusion with the State High School system and to be more in keeping with the college names of the other PMSA schools.

The college roll in the early 1960s hovered around the 180 mark, as the facilities were strictly limited and no more could be accommodated. The site was only one and a quarter acres, so while this was a period of great expansion in numbers in the other QGSSSA girls’ schools, Moreton Bay College remained a small school and found it harder to meet growing commitments in an ever-expanding QGSSSA competition. Eventually, in the early 1970s, Moreton Bay College withdrew from QGSSSA sport on the understanding that it could return when numbers increased sufficiently.

In 1965, after a period as acting head, Mrs Viola Owen-Winchester was appointed principal. From time to time there was talk of moving the school to a property at the southern end of Manly Road, but nothing came of it. The rural recession hit hard at what was essentially a boarding school with a small day component. In 1975, with the roll down to 125, the PMSA decided to close the college.

Although this decision was rescinded soon after, great damage was done. Parents withdrew their daughters, teachers left and in 1976 there were 65 girls at the school. The faith of those who remained was staunch indeed and none were stauncher than Mrs Winchester who battled, with the aid of the parents and friends, to keep the college open. Eventually, the Uniting Church assumed responsibility for the college and set up a new Board with a strong local content, under the Chairmanship of Mr John Mason. Under Letters Patent, issued in August 1979, Moreton Bay College was reconstituted. In that year the roll stood at 116.

At the beginning of 1980, following the retirement of Mrs Owen-Winchester, Mr Ken Waller was appointed headmaster, the first male principal in the college’s history. The languishing boarding house, down to fifteen in 1980 and so much the core of Moreton Bay College’s tradition, was closed by the Board, with regret, at the end of 1980.

At the end of 1981, the college acquired 20 hectares of hillside land in Wondall Road and the Board began planning the removal of the college to the new site. It was decided to do this in two stages, with the Primary School to move first. During 1983, the Primary buildings were erected and were occupied on the first day of school in 1984. Towards the end of 1985, the Secondary School was built. The Secondary pupils began the 1986 school year on the new site.

At the close of 1998, Mr Ken Waller retired after nineteen years of distinctive leadership of the college. In his time the college flourished, with significant growth and expansion occurring in the late 1980s and into the 1990s.

Mr Paul Teys was appointed principal from the start of the school year in 1999. During that year the Leita Boswell Hall, a primary school sports and general performance hall, was opened and dedicated in honour of Mrs Leita Boswell (Beattie), head of primary from 1981 to 1997. The following year, a prep facility was built adjacent to the Hargreaves Road entrance to the college.

The college celebrated its centenary in 2001, with an enrolment in its 100th year of 1170 girls from Prep to Year 12. During this time, a number of changes in curriculum emerged, including TAFE and school-based traineeships, expanding the curricular offerings. In 2002, the college swim team won the much sought after QGSSSA Swimming title; the MBC Centre of Excellence in Gymnastics was established, and to complete a very good year, the Seniors of 2002 achieved the highest number and proportion of OP 1 and 2 (used for Tertiary Entry) on record.

In April 2003, the college opened its own chapel for the first time in 102 years. The chapel was formerly the Upper Brookfield Uniting Church, which closed in November 2001. MBC Child Care, a long day care centre providing full care for boys and girls from 15 months, as well as outside school hours care and vacation care, was also opened in 2003. In addition, the establishment of Moreton Bay Boys’ College in collaboration with the Presbyterian and Methodist Schools Association (PMSA), added a valuable educational option for our families with sons.

At the opening of 2004, the college roll was at record levels: 1220 across the P-12 campus. In August of 2004, construction began on the music centre and concert hall, an outstanding acquisition for the college. This wonderful facility was officially opened in February 2006, and significantly enhanced the college’s already outstanding Music Program.

In March 2005, Mr Teys completed his tenure at the college. Mr McLay (deputy principal) acted as principal for the remainder of the year, during which time the board of governors appointed Ms Jennifer Haynes as principal from the commencement of 2006.

In 2007, Moreton Bay College won both the Mollie Gould Cup for Swimming and the Stephens Trophy for Athletics for the first time in MBC history. This feat was repeated in 2008. In 2009, Moreton Bay College swimmers lived up to their reputation by taking out the Mollie Gould Cup for the fifth consecutive year, totally an impressive seven times over the past eight years.

The graduates of 2006 and 2007 achieved outstanding results, which saw MBC described as ‘the most successful of the state’s all-girls schools”. In 2008, the results of the graduating class saw MBC earn the title of “Queensland’s No. 1 Academic Achiever for 2008” by The Courier-Mail. While Moreton Bay Boys’ College remained fully independent of MBC in its management, in 2008, Moreton Bay College assumed full financial responsibility for the college.

Through inclusive consultation, a renewed strategic plan 2009–2013 was released in 2008. This enabled the college to embark on its next facilities master plan which will underpin the foundations for growth as we move into the next era of the college’s life.

In July 2011, Moreton Bay College and Moreton Bay Boys’ College amalgamated, signaling an historical turning point in the college’s evolution. Whilst remaining absolutely committed to excellence in single sex education, the schools will remain separate, with their own individual personalities and attributes, but are now joined together to harness expertise, resources, knowledge, facilities and business functions to best effect.

The two Colleges were constitutionally joined by a common Board membership, under the leadership of Chair of the Board, Mr Geoff Diehm. Ms Jennifer Haynes was appointed as principal of both schools with focus being on developing alignment as appropriate across the two schools, strategic development, staff employment and financial oversight with the assistance of the cross schools' Director of Business and Finance, Mrs Helen Gabriel.

In 2012, Dr. Deborah Priest was appointed as the inaugural head of college at Moreton Bay College to oversee its daily operations and implementation of the budget and to feed into the strategic planning of the college.

Current enrolments for 2013 are at approximately 1200 students, reinforced by a renewed sense of community and involvement through the Parents & Friends and Old Girls’ Associations.

During recent years, the college has continued to establish itself as a premier co-curricular school offering a diverse programme of music, drama, the arts and a wide range of sports. The broad subject offering evolved to also provide a range of pathways, including vocational and academic opportunities to students.

Moreton Bay College continues to be one of this country’s finest independent girls’ schools and pre-eminent in the education of young women in Brisbane.

Curriculum[edit]

The school's curriculum for Years Prep to 12, is based around eight main Learning Areas: English, Mathematics, Science, SOSE, Languages, Technology, Personal Development, and the Arts. In the Senior Years, students are offered more choice, with 25 Authority subjects, four Authority-Registered subjects and Externally based Vocational courses, and a Personal Development program.[9]

Notable alumnae[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Greene Era (1901–1945)". Archives. Moreton Bay College. Retrieved 2008-04-14. 
  2. ^ "Independent Schools' Scholarships" (PDF). Scholarships. Association of Independent Schools Queensland. 2007. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-04-15. [dead link]
  3. ^ a b "College History". Discover MBC. Moreton Bay College. Retrieved 2008-04-14. 
  4. ^ a b c "Moreton Bay College – School Annual Report 2009" (PDF). News. Moreton Bay College. 2009. pp. 1–2. Retrieved 2010-06-22. [dead link]
  5. ^ "AHISA Schools". Queensland. Association of Heads of Independent Schools of Australia. 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-07-19. Retrieved 2008-04-14. 
  6. ^ "JSHAA Queensland Directory of Members". Queensland Branch. Junior School Heads' Association of Australia. 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-14. 
  7. ^ Butler, Jan (2006). "Member Schools". Members. The Alliance of Girls' Schools Australasia. Retrieved 2008-04-14. 
  8. ^ "(What is) QGSSSA". QGSSSA. Queensland Girls' Secondary Schools Sports Association Inc. 2005. Retrieved 2008-04-15. 
  9. ^ "P-12". Curriculum. Moreton Bay College. Retrieved 2008-04-14. 
  10. ^ "Ms Quentin Bryce, AC: 24th Governor of Queensland" (pdf). Government House Queensland. Retrieved 2008-04-14. 

13. ['Sims Just Dynamite'] [1]

14. [Olympic athletes profiles 2008] http://au.sports.yahoo.com/olympics/athletes/profile/-/210373/naazmi-johnston

External links[edit]