Mornington Peninsula National Park

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This article is about the national park. For the peninsula, see Mornington Peninsula.
Mornington Peninsula National Park
IUCN category II (national park)
Mornington Peninsula NP Elephant Rock Stevage.jpg
Elephant Rock, one of the park's landmarks.
Mornington Peninsula National Park is located in Victoria
Mornington Peninsula National Park
Mornington Peninsula National Park
State Victoria
Nearest town or city Melbourne
Coordinates 38°30′08″S 144°53′18″E / 38.50222°S 144.88833°E / -38.50222; 144.88833Coordinates: 38°30′08″S 144°53′18″E / 38.50222°S 144.88833°E / -38.50222; 144.88833
Area 26.86 km2 (10.4 sq mi)[1]
Established
  • 1 December 1975 (1975-12-01)
    (as Cape Schanck Coastal Park)
  • 1988
    (as Point Nepean NP)
  • 1995
    (as Mornington Peninsula NP)
[1]
Managing authorities Parks Victoria
Website Mornington Peninsula National Park
See also Protected areas of Victoria

The Mornington Peninsula National Park is a national park located in the Greater Melbourne region of Victoria, Australia. The 2,686-hectare (6,640-acre) national park is situated approximately 90 kilometres (56 mi) south of Melbourne on the Mornington Peninsula.

Together with the adjacent Arthurs Seat State Park, the national park is listed on the Register of the National Estate, in recognition of their outstanding values and their importance as part of the protected area's heritage.[1]

Features[edit]

The Coast Walk, a two–day 30-kilometre (19 mi) walking track from Cape Schanck to London Bridge takes in almost the entire coastline of the national park. The walk features a network of cliff top tracks with spectacular ocean views and dense coastal vegetation, as well as sections of long beach walks which pass by sculpted sand dunes and tidal rock pools.[2] The Farnsworth Track links Portsea Surf Beach with London Bridge and is 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) in length.[3] The Coppins Track is a 3-kilometre (1.9 mi) return walking track from Sorrento Ocean Beach to Diamond Bay.[4] The Cape Schanck Lighthouse and associated buildings were constructed from 1859 and are excellent example of the architecture of the day.[5]

Situated between Arthurs Seat and Cape Schanck on the Mornington Peninsula, Greens Bush is the largest remnant of bushland on the Peninsula. Surrounded by farmland, the area contains a variety of vegetation communities, making it a wildlife haven and excellent place for nature walking.[6]

Horse riding is a popular activity in parts of the national park, with access from the national park entrance station near Gunnamatta and also near St Andrews.[7] Dog walking is also permitted in certain parts of beachland within the park, within certain hours; with dogs required to be kept on a leash.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Mornington Peninsula National Park and Arthurs Seat State Park management plan". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. May 1988, amended 2013. p. 5. ISBN 0-7306-6743-X. Retrieved 23 August 2014.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ "Mornington Peninsula National Park: The Coast Walk". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. August 2012. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  3. ^ "Mornington Peninsula National Park: The Farnsworth Track". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. March 2012. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  4. ^ "Mornington Peninsula National Park: Coppins Track". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. March 2012. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  5. ^ "Mornington Peninsula National Park: Coppins Track". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. November 2011. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  6. ^ "Mornington Peninsula National Park: Greens Bush". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. August 2012. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  7. ^ "Mornington Peninsula National Park: Horse riding". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. August 2012. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  8. ^ "Mornington Peninsula National Park: Dog Regulations". Parks Victoria (PDF). Government of Victoria. 2013. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 

External links[edit]