Morris Cafritz

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Morris Cafritz (1887? - 1964) was a Washington, D.C. real estate developer, and philanthropist.

Life[edit]

His family immigrated from Lithuania, to Washington, D.C. They lived at 2706 N Street, in Georgetown. He bought produce for his father's grocery store. He studied at the Corcoran School.[1] He studied at the National Law University. He bought the Star Coal and Coke Company, at 315 Q Street. In 1911, he owned a saloon, the Old-Timer's Bar, at 8th Street and K Street, Southwest, Washington, D.C.[2] He operated bowling alleys.

He joined his cousin, in the development of Park Place, near 7th Street.[3] In 1922, he started the development of Petworth, where he sold houses for $8,950,[4] or financed for $1 down and $75 a month.[5] He developed the Greenwich Forest neighborhood.[6]

He built the Ambassador Hotel, at 14th an K Street; the Westchester Apartments in 1932;[7] and the Majestic Apartments.[8]

Cafritz house, now The Field School

He built a home at 2301 Ridge Road, N.W.[9]

In 1949, he built the Cafritz Building, at 1625 Eye Street.[10] He developed along K Street, building office buildings at 1725 K, 1725 I, and 1735 I Streets.[11]

Philanthropy[edit]

He was a charter member of the YMHA, in Washington, D.C. He raised $250,000 to build the Washington, D.C. Jewish Community Center.[12][13] He was president of the Jewish Community Center.[14] In 1964, he offered to donate the Keith theater as a performing arts center.[15]

He founded the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, in 1948,[16] funding it with half his estate, $11 1/2 million.[17]

The Morris Cafritz Center for the Arts is named for him.[18][19]

Family[edit]

He married Gwendolyn Detre de Surany, in July 1929;[20] they had three children. Their home was located on Foxhall Road and is now the home of the Field School[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solomon, pp. 1-2
  2. ^ Solomon, p. 11
  3. ^ Solomon, pp. 14
  4. ^ Solomon, p. 16
  5. ^ "Junior Achievement | Washington Business Hall of Fame | History | Past Laureates | 1996 | Morris Cafritz". Myja.org. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 
  6. ^ http://www.montgomeryplanning.org/historic/documents/RevisedGreenwichForestHD_MIHPform_8202009.pdf
  7. ^ "The Westchester - Building History". Westchesterdc.com. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 
  8. ^ "Projects : Blackburn Architects, P.C". Blackburnarch.com. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 
  9. ^ Soloman, p. 32
  10. ^ Solomon, pp. 68-70
  11. ^ Solomon, p. 115
  12. ^ Solomon, pp. 18-19
  13. ^ "Jewish Washington: Scrapbook of an American Community | The Center of It All". Jhsgw.org. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 
  14. ^ Solomon, p. 368
  15. ^ Solomon, p. 114
  16. ^ "The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation". Cafritzfoundation.org. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 
  17. ^ Solomon, p. 153
  18. ^ "Center for the Arts". Dcjcc.org. Retrieved 2013-01-01. 
  19. ^ Solomon, p. 368
  20. ^ Solomon, p.22
  21. ^ Susan Heller Anderson (December 1, 1988). "Gwendolyn Cafritz, 78, Washington Hostess". The New York Times. 

Sources[edit]

  • Burt Solomon, The Washington Century: Three Families and the Shaping of the Nation's Capital, William Morrow, November 9, 2004, ISBN 978-0-06-621372-9

External links[edit]