Morton D. Hull

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Morton D. Hull

Morton Denison Hull (January 13, 1867 - August 20, 1937) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Hull attended the public schools and Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, in 1885. He graduated from Harvard University in 1892. He was admitted to the bar in 1892 and commenced the practice of law in Chicago. He was also financially interested in various manufacturing concerns. He served as a member of the Illinois House of Representatives from 1906 to 1914. He served as a member of the Illinois Senate from 1915 to 1922. He was an unsuccessful candidate for nomination for Governor in 1916. He served as a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1916. He served as a trustee of the Meadville Theological Seminary. He served as a delegate to the state constitutional convention in 1920.

Hull was elected as a Republican to the Sixty-eighth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of James R. Mann. He was reelected to the Sixty-ninth and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from April 3, 1923 to March 3, 1933. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1932. He resumed his former pursuits. Greatly active in the First Unitarian Church of Chicago, he gave money for the construction of a new sanctuary in 1931, designed by his son. He died at his summer home in Bennington, Vermont at age 70. His remains were cremated and the ashes placed in a crypt in the First Unitarian Church in Chicago.


References[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
James R. Mann
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 2nd congressional district

1923-1933
Succeeded by
P. H. Moynihan

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.