Mount Deborah

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Mount Deborah
Mount Deborah is located in Alaska
Mount Deborah
Mount Deborah
Alaska
Elevation 12,339 ft (3,761 m) NGVD 29[1]
Prominence 5,139 ft (1,566 m)[1]
Listing Ultra
Location
Location Denali Borough, Alaska, U.S.
Range Eastern Alaska Range
Coordinates 63°38′15″N 147°14′14″W / 63.6375°N 147.2372222°W / 63.6375; -147.2372222Coordinates: 63°38′15″N 147°14′14″W / 63.6375°N 147.2372222°W / 63.6375; -147.2372222[2]
Topo map USGS Healy C-1
Climbing
First ascent 1954 by Fred Beckey, Henry Meybohm, Heinrich Harrer
Easiest route snow/ice climb

Mount Deborah is a mountain in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is one of the major peaks of the eastern Alaska Range. Despite its low absolute elevation (compared to other major peaks in North America), it is a particularly large and steep peak in terms of its quick rise over local terrain. For example, the Northeast Face rises 7000 feet (2135m) in approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km). This steepness, combined with difficult access, harsh weather, and classic Alaskan ice and snow features, make this a challenging peak to climb.[3]

Mount Deborah was named in 1907 by James Wickersham for his first wife, Deborah Susan (Bell) Wickersham.[3][4]

First ascent[edit]

Mount Deborah was first climbed in 1954 by Fred Beckey, Henry Meybohm, Heinrich Harrer, via the South Ridge.

Notable attempts and ascents[edit]

  • 1953 South Ridge (attempt) by Al Paige, Howard Bowman, Brooke Marston, Doctor McFarland.
  • 1964 East Ridge (attempt) by David Roberts and Don Jensen.[5]
  • 1975 West Buttress and South Ridge FA of route, 2nd of summit by Pat Condran, Mark Hottman, Brian Okonek, Dave Pettigrew, Pat Stuart and Toby Wheeler. Summit reached May 8 after 36 days of effort.[6]
  • 1977 North Face FA of route by Dakers Gowans and Charles Macquarrie, summit reached May 8.[7]

Today's standard route is the West Face; the Northwest Ridge is also a recommended route.

Mount Deborah is the subject of one of the classics of mountaineering literature, Deborah: A Wilderness Narrative, by David Roberts, which describes a failed attempt on the peak in 1964.

Deborah Avenue in College, Alaska is named for the mountain. Parallel to the street in the same subdivision is Hayes Avenue.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Michael Wood and Colby Coombs, Alaska: A Climbing Guide, The Mountaineers, 2001.
  1. ^ a b "Mount Deborah, Alaska". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2013-01-17. 
  2. ^ "Mount Deborah". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-01-17. 
  3. ^ a b Orth, Donald J. (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 262. 
  4. ^ Atwood, Evangeline; DeArmond, Robert N. (1977). Who's Who in Alaskan Politics. Portland: Binford & Mort for the Alaska Historical Commission. p. 106. 
  5. ^ Roberts, David (1991). Deborah; and, The Mountain of my fear: the early climbs. Seattle, WA, USA: The Mountaineers. ISBN 978-0-89886-270-6. 
  6. ^ Okonek, Brian (1976). "Deborah". American Alpine Journal (New York, NY, USA: American Alpine Club) 20 (50): 294–301. 
  7. ^ Gowans, Dakers (1978). "Deborah's North Face". American Alpine Journal (New York, NY, USA: American Alpine Club) 21 (52): 337–343. 

Further reading[edit]

Roberts, David (1991). Deborah; and, The Mountain of my fear: the early climbs. Seattle, WA, USA: The Mountaineers. ISBN 978-0-89886-270-6. 

External links[edit]