Mount Holly, New Jersey

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Mount Holly, New Jersey
Township
Township of Mount Holly
Mount Holly Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mount Holly Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mount Holly Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mount Holly Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°59′43″N 74°47′11″W / 39.995351°N 74.786452°W / 39.995351; -74.786452Coordinates: 39°59′43″N 74°47′11″W / 39.995351°N 74.786452°W / 39.995351; -74.786452[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Burlington
Formed November 6, 1688 as Northampton
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Renamed November 6, 1931 as Mount Holly
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Richard DiFolco (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Township Manager Eric Berry[4]
 • Clerk Nikima S. Muller [5]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.852 sq mi (7.389 km2)
 • Land 2.806 sq mi (7.269 km2)
 • Water 0.046 sq mi (0.120 km2)  1.63%
Area rank 348th of 566 in state
31st of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 36 ft (11 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 9,536
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 9,345
 • Rank 251st of 566 in state
16th of 40 in county[12]
 • Density 3,397.9/sq mi (1,311.9/km2)
 • Density rank 191st of 566 in state
9th of 40 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08060[13][14]
Area code(s) 609[15]
FIPS code 3400548900[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882104[18][2]
Website twp.mountholly.nj.us

Mount Holly is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. It is the county seat of Burlington County[19][20] as well as an eastern suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 9,536,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 1,192 (-11.1%) from the 10,728 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 89 (+0.8%) from the 10,639 counted in the 1990 Census.[21] Mount Holly also gives its name to the National Weather Service's Weather Forecast Office for the Philadelphia metropolitan area, though the office is actually located in adjacent Westampton.[22][23]

What is now Mount Holly was originally formed as Northampton on November 6, 1688. Northampton was incorporated as one of New Jersey's first 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken to form Little Egg Harbor Township (February 13, 1740, now part of Ocean County), Washington Township (November 19, 1802), Pemberton borough (December 15, 1826), Coaxen Township (March 10, 1845, now known as Southampton Township), Pemberton Township (March 10, 1846), Westampton Township (March 6, 1850) and Lumberton Township (March 14, 1860). The township was renamed Mount Holly as of November 6, 1931, based on the results of a referendum held three days earlier.[24]

Geography[edit]

Mount Holly Township is located at 39°59′43″N 74°47′11″W / 39.995351°N 74.786452°W / 39.995351; -74.786452 (39.995351,-74.786452). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 2.852 square miles (7.389 km2), of which, 2.806 square miles (7.269 km2) of it was land and 0.046 square miles (0.120 km2) of it (1.63%) was water.[1][2]

Mount Holly borders Westampton Township, Eastampton Township, Lumberton Township, and Hainesport Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1800 3,559
1810 4,171 * 17.2%
1820 4,833 15.9%
1830 5,516 * 14.1%
1840 6,813 23.5%
1850 3,031 * −55.5%
1860 3,322 9.6%
1870 4,018 * 21.0%
1880 4,630 15.2%
1890 5,376 16.1%
1900 5,168 −3.9%
1910 5,652 9.4%
1920 5,901 4.4%
1930 6,573 11.4%
1940 6,892 4.9%
1950 8,206 19.1%
1960 13,271 61.7%
1970 12,713 −4.2%
1980 10,818 −14.9%
1990 10,639 −1.7%
2000 10,728 0.8%
2010 9,536 −11.1%
Est. 2013 9,345 [11] −2.0%
Population sources: 1800-2000[25]
1800-1920[26] 1840[27] 1850-1870[28]
1850[29] 1870[30] 1880-1890[31]
1890-1910[32] 1910-1930[33]
1930-1990[34] 2000[35][36] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[24]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 9,536 people, 3,456 households, and 2,264 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,397.9 per square mile (1,311.9 /km2). There were 3,861 housing units at an average density of 1,375.8 per square mile (531.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 65.57% (6,253) White, 23.10% (2,203) Black or African American, 0.37% (35) Native American, 1.47% (140) Asian, 0.07% (7) Pacific Islander, 4.29% (409) from other races, and 5.13% (489) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 12.69% (1,210) of the population.[8]

There were 3,456 households, of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.6% were married couples living together, 16.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.5% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.19.[8]

In the township, 23.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.3 years. For every 100 females there were 102.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $53,841 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,427) and the median family income was $68,500 (+/- $4,684). Males had a median income of $51,945 (+/- $5,141) versus $37,079 (+/- $5,759) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,551 (+/- $1,785). About 7.1% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.4% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.[37]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 10,728 people, 3,903 households, and 2,583 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,750.8 people per square mile (1,448.3/km²). There were 4,248 housing units at an average density of 1,485.2 per square mile (573.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 68.68% White, 21.57% African American, 0.42% Native American, 1.37% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 4.77% from other races, and 3.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.78% of the population.[35][36]

There were 3,903 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.0% were married couples living together, 17.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.20.[35][36]

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 26.3% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.6 males.[35][36]

The median income for a household in the township was $43,284, and the median income for a family was $52,000. Males had a median income of $38,186 versus $27,425 for females. The per capita income for the township was $19,672. About 6.8% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.[35][36]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Mount Holly Township operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Council-Manager (plan 12) form of municipal government, enacted by council-initiated action as of July 1, 1990.[38] Members of the township council are elected at-large in a non-partisan vote to serve four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election in even-numbered years as part of the November general election. At a reorganization meeting after each election, the council selects a mayor and a deputy mayor from among its members.[6] In November 2011, voters passed a referendum making Mount Holly the fourth municipality to shift its non-partisan municipal elections from May to November.[39]

As of 2014, members of the Mount Holly Township Council are Mayor Richard DiFolco (term ends December 31, 2016), Deputy mayor Jason Jones (2016), Dwynne Belton (2014), Lew Brown (2016) and Richard Dow (2014).[3][40][41][42]

On May 11, 2010, voters of the Township elected Richard Dow, III and Dywnne Belton to Township Council, replacing incumbents Jules Thiessen and Brooke Tidswell, III, who served on the Council for 16 and 12 years, respectively. Dow received 557 votes, Belton 475, Christopher Sorhaindo, Dow's running mate, 470, Theissen, 377, and Tidswell, 353 votes.[43]

In July 2011, Township Council member Kimberly Kersey resigned.[44] In the November 2011 general election, Richard DiFolco was selected to fill the Kersey's vacancy.[45]

On November 8, 2011, voters of the Township elected Rich DiFolco to Township Council, who will serve the remainder of Kimberly Kersey's seat. Voters also approved the public question moving the May municipal election to November moving forward.[46]

On November 6, 2012, voters of the Township elected Lew Brown, Rich DiFolco and Jason Jones to 4-year terms on Town Council by a large margin, their terms will begin January 1, 2013.[47]

On January 12, 2014, former mayor Richard Dow, submitted his resignation as council member.[48]

On March 31, 2014, five people filed petitions to appear on the primary ballot for two four-year terms for Township Council. Former mayor and current Mount Holly Municipal Utilities Authority Commissioner Jules Thiessen, BOE member Tim Young, and current Mount Holly Board of Education member and Planning Board Chairman Brian Grant filed to run for the democratic nominations. Wife of Mayor Rich DiFolco, Janet DiFolco, and Patricia Cauley filed for the republican nomination. [49]

On June 3, 2014, Brian Grant and Jules Thiessen overwhelmingly won the Democratic Primary and will appear on the November general election ballot. They bested Tim Young by a 3-1 margin. Vote totals Grant- 319 Thiessen- 292 Young-92. The republican primary was won by Patricia Cauley and Janet DiFolco who were unopposed.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Mount Holly Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[50] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[9][51][52] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Mount Holly Township had been in the 7th state legislative district.[53]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[54] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[55][56] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[57][58]

For the 2004-15 Session, the 8th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Christopher J. Brown (R, Evesham Township) and Maria Rodriguez-Gregg (R, Evesham Township).[59] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[60] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[61]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[62] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[62] As of 2014, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio (R, 2014; Florence Township),[63] Deputy Director Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[64] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[65] Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2016; Cinnaminson Township)[66] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[67][62][68] Gargiano was named in March 2014 to serve the unexpired term of Leah Arter and was chosen to fill her position as Freeholder Director.[69]

Education[edit]

For pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade, students attend the Mount Holly Township Public Schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 905 students and 87.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.31:1.[70] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[71]) are John Brainerd School[72] (356 students in grades PreK-2), Gertrude C. Folwell School[73] (247 students in grades 3-5) and F. W. Holbein Middle School[74] (302 students in grades 6-8).[75][76]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend the Rancocas Valley Regional High School, a comprehensive regional public high school serving students from five communities encompassing approximately 40 square miles (100 km2) and including the communities of Eastampton Township, Hainesport Township, Lumberton Township, Mount Holly Township and Westampton Township.[77] The school is located in Mount Holly and is part of the Rancocas Valley Regional High School District.[78]

Students from Mount Holly Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[79]

History[edit]

Colonial era[edit]

The first European settlement in what is now Mount Holly began in 1677, when Walter Reeves acquired land from the Lenape (Delaware) Native Americans living in the area. He constructed a dam on Rancocas Creek to channel water through a raceway to power a grist mill and saw mill.[80] Edward Gaskill and his sons hand dug the mill race on their property between 1720 and 1723.[81] After the mills were established, more settlers were attracted to the area and built houses and commercial buildings on High, Church, White, Mill, and Pine streets, including the Shinn Curtis Log House (1712). By 1800, over 250 dwellings had been built.[82]

Today no mills remain on the raceway, which still flows in its original course from the Rancocas just above the dam. The raceway proved a way for herring to make their way above the dam and was the scene of an annual fish run in the spring which provided fresh herring for slating and eating. The former mill land has been preserved as the Mill Dam Park. It marks the importance of mills to the early settlements.

Revolutionary War era[edit]

On December 17, 1776, Colonel Samuel Griffin of the Continental Army crossed the Delaware River with 600 men — mostly untrained men and boys, and with little equipment — and marched to Mount Holly, where he set up a few "3-pounder" artillery pieces on Iron Works Hill. Hessian commanders von Block and Carl von Donop, were told that there were 3,000 American troops at Mount Holly.

By December 23, 1776, 2,000 Hessians were moved from Bordentown and positioned at The Mount in Mount Holly, where they engaged in a three day-long artillery exchange, known as the Battle of Iron Works Hill or Battle of Mount Holly, with the Americans on Iron Works Hill. The Americans slipped away that night.[83]

After George Washington crossed the Delaware River on December 25, 1776, the fact that thousands of Hessian troops had been drawn to Mount Holly aided in the Continental Army's success in the Battle of Trenton the next day, a surprising American victory that helped turn the Army's fading morale after the disastrous defeat at the Battle of Fort Washington just weeks before and the ignominious retreat through New Jersey.[84]

19th century[edit]

Burlington County Prison in Mount Holly, New Jersey. Photo circa 1938.

The 1793 state legislature approved the relocation of the Burlington County seat from Burlington City to Mount Holly, which was approved by voters in a 1796 referendum.[85][86][page needed] Several important municipal buildings were constructed, including the courthouse in 1796 and the county prison built circa 1819. The Burlington County Prison was designed by Robert Mills, a nationally known architect who designed the Washington Monument. The town has numerous 18th and 19th-century buildings, most of which are included in the Mount Holly Historic District; it is listed in the New Jersey and National Register of Historic Places.[87] Commercial buildings were constructed primarily along High Street.

In 1849, the Burlington and Mount Holly Railroad was established, connecting communities along the Delaware River to Philadelphia, the major city of the area. The railroad supported industrialization along its route. The Camden and Mount Holly Railroad constructed a station 20 years later near the intersection of Washington and King streets.

20th century[edit]

A trolley station was built in 1904 for the passengers making connections to Burlington City and Moorestown. New municipal buildings were constructed during the 20th century, including the Town Hall on Washington Street (1930) and the U.S. Post Office (1935) located across the street (1935), both federally funded and constructed as Works Progress Administration projects under President Franklin D. Roosevelt during the Great Depression.

In the late 1950s, Mount Holly began to have economic difficulties due to industrial restructuring and the loss of working-class jobs. In the post-World War II period, numerous blue collar, family wage jobs disappeared as the community's traditional employers, the mills and dye factories, were shut down. At first these job losses were offset in part by gains at the nearby military bases, Fort Dix and McGuire Air Force Base, especially during the Vietnam War. In 1970, the residential vacancy rate in Mount Holly was 4.3%.

By 1980, however, the vacancy rate had climbed to 8.7% as a result of the nearby military installations' downsizing after the end of the Vietnam War. During this same period, 1970–1980, shopping malls proliferated in the suburban Philadelphia area, and retail business in Mount Holly suffered.[88] Mount Holly received Urban Enterprise Zone (UEZ) status in 1995; it has provided tax incentives and other assistance programs to local businesses, including lowering the sales tax rate to 3½, half of the prevailing rate charges statewide.[89] This has helped to revive the local small business base.[89]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 38.43 miles (61.85 km) of roadways, of which 29.11 miles (46.85 km) are maintained by the municipality, 8.45 miles (13.60 km) by Burlington County and 0.87 miles (1.40 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[90]

Mount Holly is accessible at exit 5 of the New Jersey Turnpike via County Route 541.[91]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to Philadelphia on routes 317 (from Asbury Park) and 409/417/418 (from Trenton), with local service available on the 413 route between Camden and Burlington.[92][93]

Points of interest[edit]

Thomas Shinn Home, 1712
  • Mount Holly Cemetery
  • Shinn Curtis Log House, constructed out of hand-hewn logs, the house was built in 1712; the original log house was uncovered in 1967. A larger house that had been built around it was demolished, revealing the early house beneath, which has been restored.[94]
  • Burlington County Prison, opened in 1819, it was the oldest continually operated prison in the country when it closed in 1965 after more than 150 years of service.[95]
  • Old Courthouse Complex, designed by Samuel Lewis and constructed in 1796.[96]
  • St. Andrew's Episcopal Church
  • Friends Meeting House
  • Brainerd Schoolhouse is a one-room schoolhouse that was constructed in 1759 and operated as a school for nearly 100 years. In 1951, the school was transferred from the Female Benevolent Society, which had owned and operated the site for 136 years, to the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America.[97]
  • Relief Fire Company No. 1, home of the oldest continuously operating volunteer fire company in the United States.[98]
  • Thomas Budd House is the township's third-oldest house, dating to 1744.[99]
  • Stephen Girard House was the home of Girard, who moved to Mount Holly shortly after his marriage in 1777 and purschased the partially completed house, as recorded in 1779.[100]
  • John Woolman Memorial was constructed in the late 1700s on a porion of an orchard that had belonged to Woolman.[101]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Mount Holly Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 7, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Council Members, Township of Mount Holly. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  4. ^ Department Directory, Township of Mount Holly. Accessed October 19, 2013.
  5. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Mount Holly. Accessed October 19, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Mount Holly, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mount Holly township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mount Holly township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 21, 2012.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mount Holly, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 19, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mount Holly, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 19, 2013.
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  20. ^ Burlington County, NJ, National Association of Counties. Accessed January 20, 2013.
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  22. ^ Weather Forecast Office Philadelphia / Mount Holly, National Weather Service. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  23. ^ Weather Forecast Office for Philaldelphia / Mount Holly, National Weather Service. Accessed August 11, 2013. "The Mount Holly NWSFO serves approximately eleven million people in thirty-four (34) counties located within Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The office is located at 732 Woodlane Road (State Route 630) off of State Route 541 in Westampton Township, Burlington County, New Jersey."
  24. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 96. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed February 7, 2013.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 19, 2013.
  27. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 7, 2013. Population is listed as 6,812.
  28. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 264, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 7, 2013. "Northampton township in 1850 contained a population of 3,031; in 1860, 2,997, and in 1870, 4,018."
  29. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 7, 2013.
  30. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 7, 2013.
  31. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 7, 2013.
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  38. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 19, 2013.
  39. ^ Krebs, Rose. "Mount Holly voters approve election date change, select new council member", Burlington County Times, November 9, 2011. Accessed October 19, 2013. "The township got a taste of what will be the new norm for its municipal elections: voting in November.On Tuesday, voters resoundingly supported a measure to change municipal elections from May to November by a 1,051 to 196 vote, according to unofficial results. Bass River, Bordentown City and Medford Lakes are now the only county towns that still hold May municipal elections."
  40. ^ Krebs, Rose. "Change comes to Mt. Holly township government", Burlington County Times, January 3, 2013. Accessed October 19, 2013. "'It's an absolute honor,' Richard Dow said after being sworn in as mayor at the Township Council’s reorganization Tuesday.... Also Tuesday, Rich DiFolco was named deputy mayor, and Jason Jones and Lew Brown were sworn in as new members. The three were elected to four-year terms in November. The other councilman is Dwynne Belton."
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  43. ^ Krebs, Rose. "Incumbents ousted on Mt. Holly council", Burlington County Times, May 12, 2010.
  44. ^ Krebs, Rose. "Councilwoman Kimberly Kersey resigns post", Burlington County Times, July 13, 2011. Accessed October 5, 2011. "Kimberly Kersey has announced she’s leaving the Township Council. Kersey informed the public that Monday night’s meeting would be her last as a member of the five-member governing body."
  45. ^ Krebs, Rose. "Mount Holly council candidate wants absentee ballots recounted", Burlington County Times, November 22, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2011. "Allan Hollowell, who according to official results from the County Clerk’s Office lost to Richard DiFolco by a 590-572 vote, sent a letter to Superior Court Assignment Judge Ronald E. Bookbinder late last week asking for the recount....
  46. ^ Krebs, Rose. "Mount Holly voters approve election date change, select new council member", Burlington County Times, November 9, 2011
  47. ^ "New Leadership will take control of Mt. Holly", Burlington County Times, November 7, 2012. Election results: DiFolco 2030, Jones 1954, Brown 1951, Donnelly 1158, Hollowell 1099.
  48. ^ "Dow resigns from Mount Holly council", Philly.com, January 12, 2014.
  49. ^ "3rd Congressional District race among several primary contests", Burlington County Times, March 31, 2014.
  50. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  51. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  52. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  53. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  54. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
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Reading list[edit]

  • Bastien, Jan Lynn, Ghosts of Mount Holly; A History of Haunted Happenings. (Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2008)
  • De Cou, George. Historical Sketches of Mount Holly and Vicinity. (Mount Holly, NJ: G. DeCou, 1936).
  • Rizzo, Dennis C. Mount Holly, New Jersey: Hometown Reinvented. (Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2007).
  • Shinn, Henry C. The History of Mount Holly. (Mount Holly, NJ: Herald Printing House, 1977).
  • Winzinger, Heidi J. and Mary L. Smith. Mount Holly (Images of America). (Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2001).

External links[edit]