Mount Huntington (Alaska)

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Mount Huntington
Mount Huntington is located in Alaska
Mount Huntington
Mount Huntington
Alaska
Elevation 12,241 ft (3,731 m)[1]
Prominence 2,890 ft (880 m)[1]
Location
Location Denali National Park and Preserve, Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska, U.S.
Range Central Alaska Range
Coordinates 62°58′02″N 150°53′55″W / 62.96722°N 150.89861°W / 62.96722; -150.89861Coordinates: 62°58′02″N 150°53′55″W / 62.96722°N 150.89861°W / 62.96722; -150.89861
Topo map USGS Talkeetna D-2
Climbing
First ascent 1964 by Lionel Terray et al.
Easiest route rock/snow/ice climb

Mount Huntington is a striking rock and ice pyramid in the Central Alaska Range, about 8 miles (13 km) south-southeast of Mount McKinley. It is also about 6 miles (10 km) east of Mount Hunter. While overshadowed in absolute elevation by McKinley, Huntington is a steeper peak: in almost every direction, faces drop over 5,000 feet (1,520 m) in about a mile (1.6 km). Even its easiest route presents significantly more technical challenge than the standard route on McKinley, and it is a favorite peak for high-standard technical climbers.

Mount Huntington was first climbed in 1964 by famed French alpinist Lionel Terray and party, via the Northwest Ridge, also called the French Ridge. The second ascent the following year, via the West Face/West Rib, is chronicled by noted climber and author David Roberts in The Mountain of My Fear. The mountain can be accessed either from the West Fork of the Ruth Glacier, on the north side of the mountain, or the Tokositna Glacier, on the south side.

Notable ascents[edit]

  • 1964 French Ridge Lionel Terray et al.
  • 1965 Harvard Route (VI 5.9 A2 70-degree ice) by David Roberts, Ed Bernd, Don Jensen, Matt Hale.[2]
  • 1978 North Face Jack Roberts and Simon McCartney, summit reached on July 6, 1978.[3]
  • 1978 Southeast Spur Joseph Kaelin, Kent Meneghin, Glenn Randall and Angus M. Thuermer, Jr., summit reached on July 9, 1978.[4]
  • 1989 Nettle-Quirk Route disputed FA by Dave Nettle and James Quirk, summit reached May 24, 1989.[5]

Further reading[edit]

  • Roberts, David (1991). The Mountain of My Fear/Deborah: A Wilderness Narrative. Seattle, WA, USA: Mountaineers Books. ISBN 0-89886-270-1. 
  • Wood, Michael; Coombs, Colby (2002). Alaska: A Climbing Guide. Seattle, WA, USA: Mountaineers Books. ISBN 0-89886-724-X. 
  • Terray, Lionel (1963). Conquistadors of the Useless. Geoffrey Sutton (translator). Victor Gollancz Ltd. pp. 353–363. ISBN 0-89886-778-9. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mount Huntington". Bivouac.com. http://www.bivouac.com/MtnPg.asp?MtnId=7921. Retrieved 2013-12-23.
  2. ^ Roberts, David (1991). The Mountain of My Fear/Deborah: A Wilderness Narrative. Seattle, WA, USA: Mountaineers Books. ISBN 0-89886-270-1. 
  3. ^ Roberts, Jack (1979). "The Timeless Face: The North Face of Mount Huntington". American Alpine Journal (New York, NY, USA: American Alpine Club) 22 (53): 70–80. ISSN 0065-6925. 
  4. ^ Thuermer, Angus (1979). "Huntington's Southeast Spur". American Alpine Journal (New York, NY, USA: American Alpine Club) 22 (53): 81–89. ISSN 0065-6925. 
  5. ^ Quirk, James (1990). "Moose's Tooth and Huntington". American Alpine Journal (New York, NY, USA: American Alpine Club) 32 (64): 43–49. ISBN 0-930410-43-2. 

External links[edit]