Mount Marapi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about Mount Marapi in West Sumatra. For Mount Merapi in Central Java, see Mount Merapi.
Marapi
Marapi.jpg
Marapi in 2005
Elevation 2,891 m (9,485 ft)[1]
Prominence 2,116 m (6,942 ft)
Listing Ultra
Ribu
Location
Marapi is located in Indonesia
Marapi
Marapi
West Sumatra, Indonesia
Range Barisan Mountains
Coordinates 00°22′51.59″S 100°28′22.79″E / 0.3809972°S 100.4729972°E / -0.3809972; 100.4729972Coordinates: 00°22′51.59″S 100°28′22.79″E / 0.3809972°S 100.4729972°E / -0.3809972; 100.4729972[1]
Geology
Type Complex volcano
Last eruption February 2014

Marapi (also known as Merapi or Berapi) is a complex volcano in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Its name means Mountain of Fire, and it is the most active volcano in Sumatra. Its elevation is 2,891.3 metres (9,485.9 ft). A number of cities and towns are situated around the mountain, including Bukittinggi, Padang Panjang and Batusangkar.

According to legend, the mountain is the site first settled by the Minangkabau people after their ship landed on the mountain when it was the size of an egg and surrounded by water.[2] There are large numbers of upright burial stones in the region which are oriented in the direction of the mountain, indicating its cultural significance.[3]

Since August 3, 2011 Alert Level has been established by Center of Vulcanology and Mitigation Geology Disaster.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Marapi". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=0601-14%3D. Retrieved 2013-12-24.
  2. ^ Summerfield, Anne; Summerfield, John (1999). Walk in Splendor: Ceremonial Dress and the Minangkabau. UCLA. ISBN 0-930741-73-0. 
  3. ^ Miksic, John (2004). "From megaliths to tombstones: the transition from pre-history to early Islamic period in highland West Sumatra.". Indonesia and the Malay World 32 (93): 191. doi:10.1080/1363981042000320134. 
  4. ^ "Februari, Marapi Meletus 41 Kali". Padang Ekspres. February 20, 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-24. 

External links[edit]