Mountain Lakes, New Jersey

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"Mountain Lakes" redirects here. For the census-designated place in New Hampshire, see Mountain Lakes, New Hampshire.
Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Mountain Lakes
Mountain Lakes highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mountain Lakes highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°53′29″N 74°26′28″W / 40.891374°N 74.441114°W / 40.891374; -74.441114Coordinates: 40°53′29″N 74°26′28″W / 40.891374°N 74.441114°W / 40.891374; -74.441114[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated April 29, 1924
Government[7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Dan Happer (R, term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4][5]
 • Manager Robert Tovo
 • Clerk Christina Whitaker[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.885 sq mi (7.473 km2)
 • Land 2.616 sq mi (6.775 km2)
 • Water 0.269 sq mi (0.698 km2)  9.34%
Area rank 343rd of 566 in state
28th of 39 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 489 ft (149 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 4,160
 • Estimate (2013[12]) 4,269
 • Rank 406th of 566 in state
33rd of 39 in county[13]
 • Density 1,590.3/sq mi (614.0/km2)
 • Density rank 327th of 566 in state
18th of 39 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07046[14][15]
Area code(s) 973[16]
FIPS code 3402748480[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885310[19][2]
Website www.mtnlakes.org
Mountain Lakes Historic District
Location Roughly bounded by Pocono Road, Denville Township line, Fanny Road, and RR Tracks, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Area 1,397 acres (565 ha)
Built 1908
Architectural style Late 19th And Early 20th Century American Movements, Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals
Governing body Local
NRHP Reference # 05000963[20]
Added to NRHP September 7, 2005

Mountain Lakes is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States, and a suburb of New York City. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,160,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 96 (-2.3%) from the 4,256 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 409 (+10.6%) from the 3,847 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Mountain Lakes was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1924, from portions of Boonton Township and Hanover Township, subject to the results of a referendum passed on April 29, 1924.[22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Mountain Lakes as the 26th best place to live in New Jersey in its rankings of the "New Jersey's Top Towns 2011-2012" in New Jersey.[23]

According to Neighborhood Scout, Mountain Lakes is one of New Jersey's most highly educated municipalities, with 85.94% of adults attaining a four-year undergraduate or graduate degree, quadruple the national average of 21.84%, while the percentage of white-collar workers was 98.77%.[24]

Geography[edit]

Mountain Lakes is located at 40°53′29″N 74°26′28″W / 40.891374°N 74.441114°W / 40.891374; -74.441114 (40.891374,-74.441114). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.885 square miles (7.473 km2), of which, 2.616 square miles (6.775 km2) of it was land and 0.269 square miles (0.698 km2) of it (9.34%) was water.[1][2]

Part of The Tourne county park is in Mountain Lakes.[25]

The man-made lakes in Mountain Lakes include Birchwood Lake, Crystal Lake, Mountain Lake, Sunset Lake, Wildwood Lake, and Cove Lake. It is only legal to swim in Birchwood Lake, and Mountain Lake in the areas that are roped off. Swimming is allowed between the hours of 5 am to 10 PM every day between the months of June and August with a beach badge purchased at the borough hall.[26]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 2,132
1940 2,205 3.4%
1950 2,806 27.3%
1960 4,037 43.9%
1970 4,739 17.4%
1980 4,153 −12.4%
1990 3,847 −7.4%
2000 4,256 10.6%
2010 4,160 −2.3%
Est. 2013 4,269 [12] 2.6%
Population sources:1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,160 people, 1,313 households, and 1,144 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,590.3 per square mile (614.0 /km2). There were 1,363 housing units at an average density of 521.1 per square mile (201.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 89.57% (3,726) White, 0.36% (15) Black or African American, 0.07% (3) Native American, 7.64% (318) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.34% (14) from other races, and 2.02% (84) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.55% (106) of the population.[9]

There were 1,313 households, of which 53.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.9% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.9% were non-families. 11.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.44.[9]

In the borough, 34.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 16.8% from 25 to 44, 33.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 99.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $155,139 (with a margin of error of +/- $20,127) and the median family income was $181,600 (+/- $26,906). Males had a median income of $144,688 (+/- $24,336) versus $77,734 (+/- $26,273) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $75,525 (+/- $11,503). About 2.1% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[31]

According to The New York Times, foreigners as diverse as Germans, Chinese, South Africans, and New Zealanders have been moving into the borough.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 4,256 people, 1,330 households, and 1,186 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,593.0 people per square mile (615.4/km2). There were 1,357 housing units at an average density of 507.9 per square mile (196.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.05% White, 0.38% African American, 5.17% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.69% of the population.[29][30]

There were 1,330 households out of which 53.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 83.3% were married couples living together, 3.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.8% were non-families. 9.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.20 and the average family size was 3.41.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 35.7% under the age of 18, 3.1% from 18 to 24, 23.4% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 99.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.0 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $141,757, and the median income for a family was $153,227. Males had a median income of $100,000+ versus $61,098 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $65,086. About 1.4% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Mountain Lakes operates within the Faulkner Act under the Council-Manager form of municipal government (Plan E), implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1975.[33] The Borough Council consists of seven elected officials, who are elected at-large for four-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with either three or four seats coming up for election every other year. The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are chosen by the members of the Council from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each year during the first week in January.[7]

As of 2013, members of the Mountain Lakes Borough Council are Mayor Dan Happer (R, term as mayor ends December 31, 2013; term on council ends 2014), Deputy mayor Doug McWilliams (R, term as deputy mayor ends 2013; term on council ends 2016), Frank Borin (R, 2016), Jason Bradlee (R, 2016), Blair Bravo (R, 2014), Peter Holmberg (R, 2014) and John Lester (R, 2016).[4][5][34]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Mountain Lakes is located in the 11th Congressional District[35] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[10][36][37]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[41][42]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[43][44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[47] As of 2011, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director William J. Chegwidden (Wharton),[48] Deputy Freeholder Director Douglas R. Cabana (Boonton Township),[49] Gene F. Feyl (Denville),[50] Ann F. Grassi (Parsippany-Troy Hills),[51] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (Montville),[52] John J. Murphy (Morris Township)[53] and Hank Lyon (Montville Township),[54][55]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,964 registered voters in Mountain Lakes, of which 715 (24.1%) were registered as Democrats, 975 (32.9%) were registered as Republicans and 1,271 (42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[56]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 49.2% of the vote here (1,177 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 49.1% (1,173 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (27 votes), among the 2,391 ballots cast by the borough's 3,103 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.1%.[57] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 55.1% of the vote here (1,299 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 43.6% (1,027 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (21 votes), among the 2,356 ballots cast by the borough's 3,018 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.1.[58]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 57.1% of the vote here (937 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.3% (530 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.0% (164 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (6 votes), among the 1,642 ballots cast by the borough's 3,024 registered voters, yielding a 54.3% turnout.[59]

Education[edit]

The Mountain Lakes Schools serve public school students in Pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[60]) are Wildwood Elementary School[61] for grades K-5 (483 students), Briarcliff Middle School[62] for grades 6-8 (310 students) and Mountain Lakes High School[63] for grades 9-12 (689 students), along with Lake Drive School (73 students), which serves as a regional school for deaf and hard of hearing students from birth through high school, with students from nearly 100 communities in 12 New Jersey counties.[64][65] Students from Boonton Township attend the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[66] The school was the 7th-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 328 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2012 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", after being ranked 9th in 2010 out of 322 schools listed.[67]

Mountain Lakes is also home to The Craig School, a private coeducational day school serving students in third through twelfth grade. The school has an enrollment of 160 students split between the Lower School (grades 3-8), located in Mountain Lakes, and the Upper School (grades 9-12), in Lincoln Park.[68]

History[edit]

Mountain Lakes, New Jersey is one of the oldest craftsman communities in the United States. The town features clusters of bungalow and chateau homes built by Herbert J. Hapgood as well as the contemporary studio craft style. In 1910 Mountain Lakes was a rural woodland owned by a few families with names such as Righter, Grimes, Ball and Van Duyne. Over the next ten years this rural woodland changed completely; it became a planned suburban community. The town developed a natural and architectural character unlike any other. Overall little has changed since this time and Mountain Lakes still maintains this character intact. It has been regarded as one of the most unique communities in all of America. In 1910 when Hapgood constructed these large estate homes the Arts and Crafts movement was at its summit and the homes often maintained a large yet boxy shape. In 1924 Mountain Lakes was officially incorporated into its own town. Following World War II approximately seventy homes were build. Although a number other planned communities in New Jersey have survived such as Llewellyn Park, before it, and Radburn, after it, Mountain Lakes is one of the few towns designed in the 1910 decade that has both survived and grown with its original goals and character intact.

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers train service at the Mountain Lakes station[69] on the Montclair-Boonton Line to Hoboken Terminal and to Pennsylvania Station in Midtown Manhattan via Midtown Direct through Newark Broad Street Station.[70][71]

Places of interest[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Mountain Lakes include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Borough Council, Borough of Mountain Lakes. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  5. ^ a b Morris County Manual 2013, p. 52. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Mountain Lakes. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Mountain Lakes, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mountain Lakes borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mountain Lakes borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  12. ^ a b [1], United States Census Bureau. Accessed 2014-06-27.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mountain Lakes, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mountain Lakes, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 195. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  23. ^ Staff. "The Top 20 Towns in New Jersey", New Jersey Monthly, August 15, 2011. Accessed January 7, 2013.
  24. ^ Mountain Lakes, NJ, Neighborhood Scout. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  25. ^ The History of the Tourne, Borough of Mountain Lakes. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  26. ^ Forrest, Cindy. "Mountain Lakes Council considers beach badge age change", Neighbor News (Boonton), May 4, 2012. Accessed October 24, 2013. "If passed, the amended law would require a tag for "all residents 2 years of age or older desiring to use facilities at Island Beach, Birchwood Beach and borough-owned lakes between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. between Memorial Day and Labor Day.'"
  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  28. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 1, 2011.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Mountain Lakes borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Mountain Lakes borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Mountain Lakes borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2012.
  32. ^ Jill P. Capuzzo (2014-06-25). "Mountain Lakes, N.J.: A ‘Resort Getaway’ to Call Home". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-06-28. 
  33. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  34. ^ Forrest, Cindy. "Goodbye to veteran Mountain Lakes Council members", Neighbor News, January 16, 2013. Accessed March 5, 2013."G. Douglas McWilliams ran successfully for another term. Also elected were Republicans Frank Borin, Jason Bradlee and John Lester.... In two unanimous votes, former Deputy Mayor Dan Happer was elected mayor and McWilliams was elected deputy mayor."
  35. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  39. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  42. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  44. ^ District 25 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  48. ^ William J. Chegwidden, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  49. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  50. ^ Gene F. Feyl, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  51. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  52. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  53. ^ John J. Murphy, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  54. ^ Hank Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  55. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  56. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  57. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  58. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  59. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  60. ^ Data for the Mountain Lakes Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  61. ^ Wildwood Elementary School, Mountain Lakes Schools. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  62. ^ Briarcliff Middle School, Mountain Lakes Schools. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  63. ^ Mountain Lakes High School, Mountain Lakes Schools. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  64. ^ Lake Drive School, Mountain Lakes Schools. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  65. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Mountain Lakes Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  66. ^ Mountain Lakes High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 24, 2013. "Mountain Lakes High School is a 9th through 12th grade school which serves the communities of Mountain Lakes and Boonton Township. The school enjoys an excellent reputation and also supports the enrollment of approximately 40 hearing impaired students, part of the Lake Drive Program, who travel from all over the state to attend Mountain Lakes High School. "
  67. ^ Staff. "The Top New Jersey High Schools: Alphabetical", New Jersey Monthly, August 16, 2012. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  68. ^ About, The Craig School. Accessed December 20, 2012. "Welcome to The Craig School of Mountain Lakes (grades 3-8) and Lincoln Park (grades 9-12)!"
  69. ^ Mount Lakes station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  70. ^ Montclair-Boonton Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  71. ^ Morris County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  72. ^ "Aboard the Underground Railroad: Grimes Homestead, National Park Service. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  73. ^ Brigadier General Frederick Walker Castle, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey. Accessed August 19, 2007. "Brigadier General Castle was born October 14, 1908 at Fort McKinley, Manila, Philippines, during the first foreign service tour of his father, the late Colonel Benjamin Frederick Castle then in Tientsin, China, Washington, D.C., Paris, and finally in Mountain Lakes, NJ where the family resided for many years after World War I."
  74. ^ Steering Committee Biographies, accessed May 9, 2007. "Born and raised in Mountain Lakes, New Jersey, Freeland received a bachelor’s degree in American Studies from Amherst College in 1963 and a doctorate in American Civilization from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968."
  75. ^ Guliti, Tom. "Lou bids farewell to Friesen", The Record (Bergen County), September 27, 2005. Accessed December 20, 2012. "Friesen closed on his new house in Mountain Lakes about 30 minutes before Devils general manager Lou Lamoriello called to inform him of the deal in which the Capitals gave up only a third-round pick in the 2006 draft."
  76. ^ Everson, Darren. "DEVILS DEAL FRIESEN TO CAPITALS", Daily News (New York), September 27, 2005. Accessed December 20, 2012. "Still, the move was a huge disappointment to Friesen, whose Game 7-winning goal against Ottawa ended the 2003 Eastern Conference finals and propelled Jersey to the Stanley Cup. He just closed on a house in Mountain Lakes yesterday."

External links[edit]