Mr. Lonely

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For the 2007 film, see Mister Lonely.
"Mr. Lonely"
Single by Bobby Vinton
from the album Roses Are Red
B-side "It's Better To Have Loved"
Released 1964
Recorded 1962
Genre Pop
Length 2:40
Label Epic
Writer(s) Bobby Vinton, Gene Allen
Bobby Vinton singles chronology
"Clinging Vine"
(1964)
"Mr. Lonely"
(1964)
"The Bell That Couldn't Jingle"
(1964)

"Mr. Lonely" is a song co-written and recorded by Bobby Vinton. The song featured originally as part of Vinton's album Roses Are Red during 1962. Later that year, Buddy Greco recorded a version of the song using a very similar musical arrangement as Vinton's version. Greco's single release scored #64 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart during November 1962. Vinton's recording was included on his Greatest Hits album during 1964 autumn and concurrently issued as a single, scoring #1 on the Billboard chart during December of that year.

The song describes a soldier who is sent overseas and has no communication with his home; the singer laments his condition and wishes for someone to talk with. The single of Vinton's recording was released just as the Vietnam War was escalating; many soldiers were experiencing a similar situation, which may have increased the song's popularity. During 1966, Vinton and Gene Allan re-teamed to compose a sequel song, "Coming Home Soldier", which scored #11 on the Billboard chart.

During 1967, former Yugoslav beat band Zlatni Dečaci recorded a Serbian language cover version of the song, entitled "Sam".[1] Philippine singer Victor Wood made a bilingual version of the song, alternating the original lyrics with Filipino ones. This particular cover version became popular in the Philippines and gave some fame to the entertainer. In 2005, Senegalese-American R&B singer Akon borrowed and sampled lyrics from this song for his 2005 hit single "Lonely", which features on his debut studio album Trouble. This song uses a sped-up sample of the earlier song.

Cultural references[edit]

Preceded by
"Ringo" by Lorne Greene
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
December 12, 1964 (one week)
Succeeded by
"Come See About Me" by The Supremes

References[edit]