Mru language

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with Mro language. ‹See Tfd›
Mru
Region Bangladesh, Burma
Native speakers
50,000  (1999–2007)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 mro
Glottolog mruu1242[3]
A group of Mrus foraging in the hills
The Mru people and language are located in the lower right hand corner of the map of Bangladesh

Mru is a Tibeto-Burman language and one of the recognized languages of Bangladesh. It is spoken by a community of Mros (Mru) inhabiting the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh and also in Burma with a population of 22,000 in Bangladesh according to the 1991 census. The Mros are the second-largest tribal group in Bandarban District of the Chittagong Hill Tracts. A small group of Mros also live in Rangamati Hill District.

The Mru language is considered "definitely endangered" by UNESCO in June 2010.[4]

It is one of the Tibeto-Burman languages that is difficult to classify and has marginal affiliations with Burmic. Mru and Meithei in India, Bangladesh, and Burma, would appear close to the Kukish languages.[5] However, although once classified as Kukish, the Mru language is thought to be closer to Lolo–Burmese.[6]

Distribution[edit]

The Mros live in forest areas of Lama, Ruma, Alikaram, and Thanchi near Chimbuk Mountain of Bandarban District (Rashel 2009). They also live in Sittwe (Akiab), Rakhine State, Burma.

Subdivisions[edit]

There are five major Mro clans (Rashel 2009).

  • Dengua
  • Premsang
  • Kongloi
  • Maizer
  • Ganaroo Gnar

Rashel (2009) also lists another classification scheme which lists ten Mro clans.

  • Yarua (subdivisions below)
    • Khatpo
    • Chimlung
    • Zongnow
    • Chawla
  • Yaringcha
  • Tang
  • Deng
  • Kough
  • Tam-tu-chah
  • Kanbak
  • Prenju
  • Naichah
  • Yomore

Numerals[edit]

Rashel (2009:159) lists the following Mro numerals.

  1. lɔk
  2. pre
  3. ʃum
  4. taːli
  5. taŋa
  6. tro
  7. rinit
  8. rijat
  9. tako
  10. muit

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mru at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Mruic". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Mru". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  4. ^ UNESCO, "Bangladesh: Some endangered languages (information from Ethonologue, UNESCO)", June 2010.
  5. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica, Article: Sino-Tibetan Languages
  6. ^ Peiros, Ilia. 1997. "Lolo–Burmese linguistic archaeology." Mon–Khmer Studies 27: 233-48. (Mon–Khmer Studies Journal website)

Further reading[edit]