Mu Canis Majoris

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18 Canis Majoris
Canis Major constellation map.svg
Cercle rouge 100%.svg

The position of μ CMa (circled in red).
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0 (ICRS)
Constellation Canis Major
Right ascension 06h 56m 06.65s[1]
Declination −14° 02′ 36.4″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 5 (naked eye)[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type K3III giant star (A)[2]
B9.5V (B)[3]
Astrometry
Distance ~910 ly
(~278[4] pc)
Other designations
Mu CMa, Mu Canis Majoris, 18 Canis Majoris, 18 CMa, μ Canis Majoris, μ CMa, HR 2593, BD −13° 1741, HD 51250, HIP 33345, HIC 33345

Mu Canis Majoris (μ Canis Majoris, 18 Canis Majoris), also known as HR 2593 and BD-13°1741; is a quadruple[citation needed] star complex located in the constellation Canis Major. The multiple star is located at right ascension 06h 56m 06.65s and declination −14° 02′ 36.4″.[1][5] The brighter two components can be split in a small telescope.[6]The star system is estimated to be 278 parsecs (910 light-years) from the Sun.[4] The star has the traditional names Isida and Isis.[4][7]

Associated stars[edit]

[1][8]

Mu Canis Majoris A (HD 51250)
(06h 56m 06.64589s,−14° 02′ 36.3520″) A K3III giant star with a naked eye apparent magnitude of 5,[2] and an absolute magnitude of -2.22. Mu Canis Majoris has a mass of 3.1 Solar masses.[citation needed] Mu CMa is about 390 times fainter than the brightest star in the night sky Sirius.[NB 1]
Mu Canis Majoris B (HD 51251)
(06h 56m 06.4s,−14° 02′ 31″) A B9.5V star with an apparent magnitude of 7.6.[3]
Mu Canis Majoris C (BD-13°1741 C)
(06h 56m 00.9922s,−14° 02′ 08.861″) A star with an apparent magnitude of 10.2 [9]
Mu Canis Majoris D (BD-13°1741 D)
(06h 56m 13.0466s,−14° 01′ 48.272″) a star with an apparent magnitude of 10.5 [10]

Mu CMa should not be confused with the 9th magnitude variable star MU CMa located near NGC 2360.[11]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "CCDM J06561-1402". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  2. ^ a b c "HD 51250". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  3. ^ a b "HD 51251". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  4. ^ a b c "μ CMa (Isis)". Wikisky. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  5. ^ "HR 2593". Vizier. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  6. ^ Consolmagno, Guy (2011). Turn Left at Orion: Hundreds of Night Sky Objects to See in a Home Telescope – and How to Find Them. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. p. 81. ISBN 1-139-50373-1. 
  7. ^ "Isida (HIP 33345)". Ashland Astronomy Studio. Retrieved 2012-06-06. 
  8. ^ "CCDM J06561-1402A". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  9. ^ "BD-13 1741C". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  10. ^ "BD-13 1741D". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Retrieved 2012-06-02. 
  11. ^ "International variable star Index: MU CMa". AAVSO. Retrieved 2012-06-03. 

External links[edit]